Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Is 25' big enough for the gulf?

  1. #1

    Default Is 25' big enough for the gulf?

    I'm planning to move to Alaska in a few years, but in the meantime I might buy a boat to use here on the Great Lakes, with the intent of bringing it up with me when I move. I have my eye on the 25' trophy walkaround with twin outboards. It's plenty fast and seaworthy, but I want to be able to run out of Seward and be able to fish around Montague or the like, keeping an eye on the weather of course. I'm not afraid of big seas; I've spent quite a few days in 6' waves out on the GL in an 20' Starcraft when I was a kid. And 6' waves on the GL are BAD compared to 6' ocean waves. That said, will a 25'er get the job done on the gulf, given a dose of common sense and caution? I do like to have a margin of safety....

  2. #2

    Default

    I'd think the Trophy would be fine. Like you said, pick you days. Been to Montague in a 22-ft C-Dory, but that wasn't in 6-ft. seas. But if you want to be comfortable/safe in 6-ft seas, then bigger (than 25-footer) is better.

    Does the Trophy have the Alaskan bulkhead (helm is enclosed), or is it open to the elements? Important feature to have enclosed unless wet and cold is what you want.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for the input. It's enclosed, will be sleeping on it at times so bed & bath are on my must have list.

    22 footer out there, eh, you're braver than me

    Any dissenting opinions?

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    If the conditions are right, you can get out and back in a fairly small boat. When stuff kicks up, you need a fairly large boat. Honestly I don't know that a 25' boat is that much bigger than a 22 to say you'd head out in weather in a 25 that you wouldn't in a 22. The advantage the 25' boat has is it's more comfortable in a chop than a 22' boat.

    If you're planning to regularly run out to Montague from Seward I'd look at a 28-32 foot boat. There is an aweful lot of open water between the mouth of Reserection bay to the Southern tip of Montague, and no where to hide.

    When the wind is fighting against the tide the entrance to Resurection bay can form some fairly steep waves and folks often are waiting at the mouth for conditions to change so they can come back in.

  5. #5
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Bigger is always better in the ocean in my opinion. The 25 trophy with the AK bulkhead and twin outboards would be a great set up for you. If you watch the forcast and utilize common sense, you should be fine. Just keep in mind there is very little cover once you round Cape Resurrection and it can whip up in a hurry.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6

    Default

    Going to Montague from Seward is something I missed in the original post. I go out of Whittier and there are places to run for cover when things get bad. You just have to pick your days out of Seward more carefully.

  7. #7

    Default

    I go out there all time in the summer when things are relatively settled (less then 5 foot forecasted seas) in my CD 22 pretty darn often. I fish Johnstone, Puget, Cape Junken, and have gone several times from Seward to Whittier, and even to Valdez a couple of times. You do need to pick your days - but you do in just about any boat. If you happen to be all the way over to Puget, and Cape Junken it is not that far to some really good anchorages. But again, that far depends on the marine forecast, and the weather. The 22 foot C-dory is a very surprising little boat. I am constantly surprised just how big of stuff it can safely come back in. Notice I didn't say go out in.......but come back in. Like everyone one else, it is just a matter of time before those seas turn into twelve footers or more. Attached is an idiot having too much fun on the Columbia Bar.....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8

    Default

    How big are those? 15 ft?

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwhacker View Post
    How big are those? 15 ft?

    Beats me. A slight bit bigger then I would take the family out in. But, by myself, well that is a different ball game. I would say that your estimate is about right, but it is always so hard to tell with pictures. Another perspective of the same day.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Here's my 2 cents worth. It might be ok in the summer with good weather, but remember the water is cold & the bad stuff happens a thousand times faster than the good stuff. A friend of mine(another gillnetter) got rolled over going from ester to cordova in some bad weather, he swam out of the cabin and crawled up on the overturned hull and sat there till he was shaking like a cold beagle, jumped back in and went back into the cabin and came back out with a soaked sleeping bag and got back on top of the hull again, he was VERY lucky that a tender(that was searching for him) found him the next day.
    If it was me i'd save my money till i got here and look around at what others are using, maybe even go out with a few folks to see what boats do what in different conditions then deside what size of boat i might want. You can always go back east and get one of them trophy boats and tow it up here. I've commercial fished on both coasts & had boats from 18-35ft in many different fisheries, even fished offshore lobsters in the canyons 100 miles offshore(in a 65 footer) and the copper river flats and the sound have some of the worst sh*t i have been in. I only had 3 friends die back east, all on one boat, in all the years i fished back there, on the other hand i've had 5 friends die here(all on the flats) fishing in weather they shouldn't have been caught out in and thats only since '91 when i started fishing the flats & the sound.
    Be careful my friend this place will kill you quick.

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    The more time I spend in the sound, the more I want a bigger boat. I know tolman skiffs have taken some impressive trips in less than ideal weather, some downright impressive journeys. I'm sure my boat is capable of conditions I never want to find myself in.

    I would highly caution against the attitude that because you've been in a boat in 6' waves in the great lakes when you were a kid that you can handle anything ak can dish at you. Were you running the boat or just along for the ride?

    Six foot swells, and 6 foot waves are an entirely different animal. I've been out in Seward in 6 foot swells, some may have been 8 feet. The boat just rose and fell like a cork, no big deal. On the ride back in I'd just ride them up and down.

    Then again the weekend before last I was coming back into Whittier after a trip out in the sound where we spent most of the time anchored up waiting out a blow. I have no idea how big the waves were as I was in my favorite hidey hole, but we did recieve 6 inches of rain overnight, and could hear the wind roaring. On the return leg we were in mostly protected waters, but I made the mistake of running between the shore and a small island with the wind and waves coming right down the channel. My mistake as the combination of the shallow floor in areas the funnelling affect made what was forecast as 2' seas honest 4' waves, and a moments of inatention at not getting off the throttle soon enough had my plow into the face of a wave that I'll call possibly 6' as it broke over the bow. The upside is I didn't take on any water and after the windows cleared I put a bit more attention into what I was doing. My passenger was chatting away, either talking because he was nervouse, or just clueless as to the less than ideal conditions we were in.

    I'm not sure how long we slogged through that stuff before getting to Culross passage, but there are many places I rather would have been, and it underscores that you should never take these waters for granted.

    I would have stayed put if not for the forecast for another blow the following day with 8' seas.

    If and when I upgrade I'm thinking about a 28 footer with dual o/b's. I simply can't afford to do so at this time, but if and when I upgrade it'll be to a boat that is more capable, not just one that is a tad bigger.

    One last thought, I want an aluminum boat. I know they are load, and they are cold. But I want to spend my time fishing, not polishing, not touching up paint, not worrying about scratching the gel coat by bringing the boat to shore.

    To say our conditions can be quite severe is a simple truth. Driving on a country road in an suv as preperation for the baja 1000 is akin to many folks boating experience translating to our waters and conditions. No insult intended, but these waters deserve cautious respect.

    PS, on last antedote. And no insult to c-dory owners as they are fine boats. A friend has had a c-dory 22 for many years. A few years back he took it out to Montague to go deer hunting, leaving from Seward. I don't recall what the sea conditions were forecast as, or the wave heights. I do recall his desription of what he did when he finally got back to port. After tying up his boat, he layed down and kissed the dock. Then he went to the bar and stayed until closing.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Douglas Island
    Posts
    248

    Default It's not always just the size....

    Good advice all! Here's just a bit more to add; it's not always just the size, the "bigger is better" concept works most times, however....the boat's design can be even more important! Smaller boats, properly designed, can be much more seaworthy than larger poorly designed boats. A boat can almost always be considered a compromise of sorts, the 25' boat that is intended for offshore use likely won't work for beans in a river and while that 25' riverboat is great on the whitewater, it will kill you quick in the big blue. Get a solid, well-designed boat for your intended use, operate well within your (and the boat's) capabilities and you're much less likely to end up a statistic. Boat Safe! Mike

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    The more time I spend in the sound, the more I want a bigger boat. I know tolman skiffs have taken some impressive trips in less than ideal weather, some downright impressive journeys. I'm sure my boat is capable of conditions I never want to find myself in.

    I would highly caution against the attitude that because you've been in a boat in 6' waves in the great lakes when you were a kid that you can handle anything ak can dish at you. Were you running the boat or just along for the ride?

    Six foot swells, and 6 foot waves are an entirely different animal. I've been out in Seward in 6 foot swells, some may have been 8 feet. The boat just rose and fell like a cork, no big deal. On the ride back in I'd just ride them up and down.

    Then again the weekend before last I was coming back into Whittier after a trip out in the sound where we spent most of the time anchored up waiting out a blow. I have no idea how big the waves were as I was in my favorite hidey hole, but we did recieve 6 inches of rain overnight, and could hear the wind roaring. On the return leg we were in mostly protected waters, but I made the mistake of running between the shore and a small island with the wind and waves coming right down the channel. My mistake as the combination of the shallow floor in areas the funnelling affect made what was forecast as 2' seas honest 4' waves, and a moments of inatention at not getting off the throttle soon enough had my plow into the face of a wave that I'll call possibly 6' as it broke over the bow. The upside is I didn't take on any water and after the windows cleared I put a bit more attention into what I was doing. My passenger was chatting away, either talking because he was nervouse, or just clueless as to the less than ideal conditions we were in.

    I'm not sure how long we slogged through that stuff before getting to Culross passage, but there are many places I rather would have been, and it underscores that you should never take these waters for granted.

    I would have stayed put if not for the forecast for another blow the following day with 8' seas.

    If and when I upgrade I'm thinking about a 28 footer with dual o/b's. I simply can't afford to do so at this time, but if and when I upgrade it'll be to a boat that is more capable, not just one that is a tad bigger.

    One last thought, I want an aluminum boat. I know they are load, and they are cold. But I want to spend my time fishing, not polishing, not touching up paint, not worrying about scratching the gel coat by bringing the boat to shore.

    To say our conditions can be quite severe is a simple truth. Driving on a country road in an suv as preperation for the baja 1000 is akin to many folks boating experience translating to our waters and conditions. No insult intended, but these waters deserve cautious respect.

    PS, on last antedote. And no insult to c-dory owners as they are fine boats. A friend has had a c-dory 22 for many years. A few years back he took it out to Montague to go deer hunting, leaving from Seward. I don't recall what the sea conditions were forecast as, or the wave heights. I do recall his desription of what he did when he finally got back to port. After tying up his boat, he layed down and kissed the dock. Then he went to the bar and stayed until closing.

    Like I said...they are great little boats. IF they weren't he probably have kissed a Ling Cod on his way to the bottom. Nobody every goes out in that stuff, it is always on the way back.

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks all for your thoughts and experiences. Sounds like I might be wise to hold off for that 28'er. With gas prices and the general state of the economy, I don't think boats are going to appreciate much anytime soon anyways.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •