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Thread: Halibut Vs. Turbot

  1. #1

    Default Halibut Vs. Turbot

    Can someone please post pix of a halibut and turbot side by side. I am new to this and I would like to see the difference. Here in the southeast, everyone tosses turbot as trash. They are known as "left-handed halibut. I'm told the eyes are located differently than on Halibut.

    I've read older posts on this forum that describe the arrowtooth flounder, turbot and halibut, but would sure like to see pix.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm,

    never heard of such a thing. Is it like a Mud Whomp or a Side Hill Gouger?

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigJake View Post
    Can someone please post pix of a halibut and turbot side by side. I am new to this and I would like to see the difference. Here in the southeast, everyone tosses turbot as trash. They are known as "left-handed halibut. I'm told the eyes are located differently than on Halibut.

    I've read older posts on this forum that describe the arrowtooth flounder, turbot and halibut, but would sure like to see pix.

    Thanks
    Greenland Turbot, also called Greenland Halibut...I'm pretty sure they are a "right-eyed" flatfish like halibut...they are apparently good to eat, as there is a commercial fishery for them and they get a good price. A key difference is that the bottom side of the turbot is greyish, not a glossy white like a halibut, distinctly different. Turbot also have a couple of vampire teeth on the roof of their mouths, behind the regular set of teeth. They are actually much more diffiult to tell apart from an arrowtooth than from a halibut. If AKBrownsfan chimes in on this, you'll get even more detail.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/crappyw...hy/2790851548/
    http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/fishwatch/s...een_turbot.htm
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

  4. #4
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Turbot is soft and mushy. YUKKKK!!!

    Haven't seen on in a while. Teeth rivaling a ling.

  5. #5

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    The first time I went fishing for halibut on my own, I caught an arrow tooth flounder that I thought was a halibut.

    The taste was ok but the texture was mushy.

    The main difference for me when looking at the species, is in the mouth. When I tried to take the hook out of the arrow tooth's mouth, it nicked me only a bit with its teeth and cut me really bad.

    They have really vicious teeth that you can see even when its mouth is closed.

    The face is alot more like an arrow tip as well, kinda pointy. Not as 'rounded' as the halibut.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

  6. #6
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    Default

    I think it's all been answered but I'll chime in too!

    Soda is correct! Another difference is the presence of an anal spine or not.

    There are 4 that look similar enough to confuse.

    1) Pacific Halibut, Has an Anal Spine, large mouth, smallish teeth. White on Blind side. Greenish w/spots on eyed side. (*anal spine is just behind anal vent and bend down the body cavity from the backbone).

    2) Greenland Turobt, has NO anal spine and teeth that erupt from the roof of the mouth (vampire fangs) Also has an "L" shaped preopercule. I would say large, white, conical teeth as well. Also has an underbite.

    3) Arrowtooth and Kamchatka flounder. NO anal spine, No fangs at roof of mouth. Rounded preoperucle. Tends to be brownish, with brownish/whitish blind side. Kams are out west by russia and look more like a turbot. (darker, as turbot tend to be black.)

  7. #7

    Default

    One thing nobody has mentioned: halibut are smooth as can be when running you hand on the dark side. The arrowtooth and the others, feel more like rockfish.

  8. #8

    Default Thanks guys

    Well shoot. I think I tossed a nice chicken overboard last week. I'd sure like to look at him again armed with this good info.

    Thanks for all the help.

  9. #9

    Default Halibut from Hell

    We call them halibut from hell because of their mean-looking teeth and unpleasant demeanor.

  10. #10
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Default

    An interesting lesson that I learned this summer:

    Halibut have skin with no scales (I knew this already)... the flounder have scales much like a rock-fish.

    This was learned when we landed our first chicken on a 4 day trip with a nice Jewish couple. If a fish has scales, it CAN be kosher. Sea creatures without scales can NOT be blessed kosher...

    Once we discovered the scaly difference, these folks wanted to start tossing back the halibut and keeping the flounder. Fine by me... it just meant fishing deeper and away from my usual honey holes. (I think we might have pissed off a few of the Petersburg gang when they tried to steal a few of my spots!)

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  11. #11
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Flounder (Lemon Sole) is just as yukky as turbot. Surprised that you go DEEPER for them. I usually find them on a shallow, sandy bottom. Poundstone and off Eagle Beach - not that I target them now.

    While I respect folks and their religous preferences, I never could understand kosher food. I guess that means they can't eat cod either.

  12. #12
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    ...
    While I respect folks and their religous preferences, I never could understand kosher food. I guess that means they can't eat cod either.
    As far as I know, that's correct. Once the first halibut came aboard and they mentioned that's the way it was for them, I made a comment about "I guess that means no sablefish for you, eh?" They declined (same reason) and I had to eat a whole side of steamed cold smoked sable for my dinner that night...

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  13. #13
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default Halibut have scales

    http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/not...sh/halibut.php
    According to AK Fish and Game Pacific Halibut have scales.

  14. #14

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    Based off the things I have read and looked at, Halibut are considered "clean" or kosher by the Jewish people. This was based off a couple Jewish websites I researched a few years back. I'm not Jewish, but I had a friend who was, so both of us looked at the issue, and concluded halibut was good for the Jewish folks. Here's a website that lists clean and unclean foods according to Jewish interpretation, http://www.thejournal.org/refdesk/cleanfood.html.

  15. #15

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    Lots of folks call arrowtooth flounder "turbot," but they're dead wrong and confusing the issue. In most areas Greenland turbot usuallly come from much deeper water than a sport is ever likely to see. Like 200 fathoms and deeper, and you'll get more turbot in 300 fathoms than you will in 200. Arrowtooth frequently venture shallower than 50 fathoms, often up to 30 fathoms mid-season.

    When I hear about mushy turbot, it's pretty sure the speaker is using the wrong name and criticizing the wrong fish. Arrowtooth certainly do get mushy when you cook them unless you can drive them through the 120-140 degree temperature range really fast while you cook them. There's an enzyme that turns their flesh into mashed potatoes in that temp range, and the less time the flesh spends in it, the less chance for the enzyme to work. The only way I've seen them cooked that comes close to beating it is microwaving, and even that doesn't work if the meat is too thick.

    The greenland turbot I've had from deep water have texture about like a 10-15 pound halibut and are even sweeter. In my book, it's too bad the danged things live so deep cuzz I'd sure be going after them if I could get them.

    Sorry bout the lecture, but when you hear about mushy turbot, you can be pretty sure the source is sloppy with names. You might like our name for arrowtooth: Vampire halibut.

  16. #16

    Default Glad I'm not Jewish...

    As that means no type of bottom "scavengers" either, as in crab, lobsters, shrimp, etc.
    Also, can't have one of the best tasting things the Lord put on the planet; BACON!
    Cheers!

  17. #17

    Default

    Turbo's are junk imo,primary market is japan,where they are low value fish,compared to say sablefish or any kind of salmon,and of course ahi.From what I remember they are the hamburger of asian fish taste buds.Ok as hanging bait for crab/shrimp if you cant get any grey cod.In general halibut wont take them as bait.
    There is no taste comparison when put up against a properly cared for Butsky.
    From what my hazy memory tells me,the best way to tell the difference between arrowtooth n turbo's is the back of the jawbone,the way I remember it the 'tooth jawbone joint (TMJ for you dental types)extends beyond the eyeball,not so on the turbo.If Im wrong than its the other way around.Who ever mentioned the scale size when comparing them to butski's is correct.
    Turbo's can range up to 35-40 lbs,arrowtooths always smaller.Generally from what I saw,turbo's n arrowtooths tend to move in after the dominant species are gone one way or the other.Turbo's tend to congrigate in ginormous schools,although sports guys will never get a handle on how big the mass can be.

    ak

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