Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Bivy Sacks

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,131

    Smile Bivy Sacks

    I experimented with a homemade Tyvek Bivy this sheep season. I was cold and wet every night, mostly due to sleeping on a glacier with an inadequate pad. However thats exactly why I wanted a bivy in the first place, to keep my bag dry in adverse conditions and maybe even camping out in an emergency. Has anyone ever found a bivy that kept their sleeping bag dry in all conditions (like pouring rain or wet snow) or is condensation a given? I mean right now I am thinking that a tarp is a lot drier than a bivy...thanks.
    “I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. “ Fred Bear

  2. #2
    Member bigdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    243

    Talking

    I bought a bivy from Cabelas and it hasn't rained on me since I bought it... I have used it on three trips and never had rain or wet weather since I purchased this product... So I guess it works better than I could have ever guessed...

  3. #3
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    i have a gortex bivy made by O/R.. great i love it.. $189 bucks though.. at beaver sports here in Fairbanks.. about the same elsewhere i have seen it also. light packable and adds about 15 deg to sack warmth.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  4. #4

    Default bivy

    I bought a lightweight bivy from Titanium Goat this winter and have used it all summer and fall so far. I like it a bunch, although I usually sleep under a sill tarp as well. However on my first trip with it this spring we pitched the tarp and had crawled in before the rain started, we were in a canyon of sorts and in the middle of the night in the downpour a small body of flowing water formed beneath me. In the morning I realized it and got up and moved my stuff, when I pulled my kit apart everything inside the bivy was for the most part dry, just the bottom of my thermarest was wet. For 99$ Im satisfied packing the 3oz bivy. But I'll always have the siltarp too.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,131

    Red face

    Thanks for the feedback. I really like the weight and price of the TI goat. I never needed a bivy before because I was pretty safe. Heavy 4 season tents and picky about the weather. But now that I am having fun pushing the envelope with lightweight gear (such as sleeping on a glacier this year) I have gotten wet and cold a lot. I decided to try a Tyvek bivy after experimenting with it a little. But it sure didn’t work this year. I am also experimenting with synthetic sleeping bags but so far I have just been cold.
    “I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. “ Fred Bear

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    205

    Default Bivy

    Instead of a Bivy I prefer a one person tent...I have a MSR single man tent...very light 1lb 1oz and very compact....you are going to pay as much for a nice single man tent as you would a nice bivy..and they set up really quick too...sleepy bags...I used the modern day 3 layer sleeping bag in the military....I was fortunate enough to leave the military with one...synthetic and they work good for me...I survived -60 temps with no tent or fire with it
    Unfortuantley I won't do that again...at least intentionally

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    I have a 20 year old REI gore-tex bivy that works as advertised. No leaks and no more condensation than any cold clammy night in a sleeping bag produces. If it wasn't doing it's job I'd be looking at a Hillegerg Bivanorak. I like the arms being sewn in but I'm not sure I like the open end at the feet. I figure it must be manageable. For survival the Bivanorak would be a nice thing to have available. The arms are just a great idea.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    98

    Default

    I have a MSR single man tent...very light 1lb 1oz and very compact
    A single man tent at 1lb 1oz? To what model are you referring? That is less weight than my HS TarpTent Contrail.

    As for a bivy sack, I too went the Ti Goat route, but haven't fully tested it to offer a full assessment. It seems to me that sleeping on a glacier when it is above freezing outside would elicit condensation issues for most sleep systems due to the stark thermal contrast.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    205

    Default Apologize

    Alright 2lbs 9oz
    I have the MSR Hubba
    Now if another 1lb 9oz effects you THAT MUCH, then I think instead of worrying about weight you should get to the gym or hike a lot more. A pound should not make that much of a difference. I am talking from experience hiking weeks on end, many many miles, up mountains, etc, both civilian and military. Believe me the extra pound is very much worth it. I have been in snow and rain and have stayed dry in this tent and it is very compact....I have a bivy and when I put that in a stuff sack compared to the tent...in my opinion it is not "that much more" when you consider the benefits.

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    98

    Default Geez

    I don't think I have ever had a gear question turn to an assault on my fitness level before! Regardless, I agree that 1lb +/- is not THAT big of a deal, unless you have a tent +1, sleeping bag +1, rifle +1, etc.; before you know it your base weight is considerably higher than it needs to be.

    The logic behind the Ti Goat bivy for me is that it is not a primary shelter, but rather at 6oz something I am willing to throw into my pack for a day of hunting away from my tent in the remote chance that I would get myself into a situation where I would want to wait out the night and "finish" a stalk in morning.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    205

    Default Hmmmmm

    The problem with computer/email communication is that it is one way. I in no way was referring or inferring anything towards "your" fitness level. If we were talking you could hear my sincerity. I apologize if you felt I was attacking you...I was not...it was just a "general" statement.

  12. #12

    Default weight

    Mtn Wx is right the Ti bivy is 6oz not 3oz, I must've had the PocketRocket weight on my mind. Incredibly light unit though I haven't had it out without the tarp in much more than a sprinkle.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Valdez, AK
    Posts
    100

    Default

    A bivy by itself has the potential to have condensation issues and potentially leak in bad weather. I like to use a bivy, but I always use it with a sil tarp. Combined I get much more room and freedom than a tent while still having good weather protection. With a tarp I can easily see outside of it, especially at night if I hear something rustling in the camp. Second with a tarp I can get the stove going and get my morning hot drink without leaving my sleeping bag. I like both tents and tarps, I am just saying when used properly a tarp and bivy sack can make a great combo.

    Jason B

  14. #14

    Default

    Black Diamond makes a great, light weight bivy also-worth checking out.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sunny SE :)
    Posts
    95

    Default OR Advanced

    I have slept in my OR Advanced bivy in downpours of rain and snow. It breathes better than anything else I have used; their Respiration Positive fabric is great. It was so foggy one night that I couldn't see 18" when I went down for the night and it was bone dry in the morning. It really sucks to take a piss at night unless you throw a tarp up though.

  16. #16

    Default Outdoor Research or Black Diamond

    Either or. I own both and have used them both for years. I will not go out anywhere without one or the other. One always stays in my day pack, just in case. They are like the best of friends-they have gotten me through some pretty crappy times!

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,837

    Default tarp

    The wife and I used a tarp in Colorado a lot on elk hunts. Worked very well for us - but for sheep hunting here in Alaska I am wondering how good it will work?

    Most of my concerns are staking it down good in high winds when above tree line. Do you guys use rocks to hold it down? I could lenghthen the cords that are on it. We have a 10x10 that we sewed beaks onto it - so it will close up prett tight.

    I am thinking that a lightweight bivy combined with the tarp and we "might" get away with using our down bags?? I would like a couple wiggy's bags - but we already have high quality down bags.....just not sure how far to try to push it with down up here.

    I think that if we draw an early sheep tag we will use the down - if not, maybe get the wiggy's for extra insurance...and try them with the bivy/tarp combo.

    ? Your thoughts?

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    614

    Default

    not sure which down bags you own. if they are marmot, WM, etc, their shell is pretty good in moisture. I wouldn't hesitate to take your down bags. Not sure how many times you have used yours, but have you ever gotten it wet? I have used my down bags and have never gotten them wet, and that included backpacking in the rain in Alaska. and a summer alaska float trip. I have had condensation on my bag in the morning and no problem there. I put moist clothes in the bag with me to dry and no problem. I wondered the same thing about a tarp above treeline. A really high wind will tear at the grommet i would think. staking in in winds doesn't seem like it would work well. it will work just fine at or below treeline, but above? i was looking at the lightweight blackdiamond epic fabric tents or golite tents as well.

  19. #19
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,837

    Default forget

    i forget who made the bags - they are 0 rated and very lightweight - not super high end -I think around 250 a piece is what I paid. They definately do NOT shed water very well with the shell. We have slept in rain and snow several times in them - but the tarp was always over us.

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I am Valley trash.
    Posts
    589

    Default Bivy is a must have!

    I have used a bivy for the last 15+ years. I use the one sold by Bob at Barneys. You pay extra but his has the pole that keeps the bag off of your face and is a great place for storing your boots and some of you clothes. You are able to open the vent and it allows the condensation to escape.

    I have hunted in snow and rain and have not had a problem yet. I do not use a tent (except for base camp) and I contribute my high hunting success due to having a bivy.

    The most important part of a hunt is keeping your bag dry and trying to save money by getting a inferior bivy doesn’t make since. Go check it out and I am sure you will not find a better bivy. I use a tarp to cover my pack and meat!

    Also this is a MUST! Wash your items in the Nikwax products.

    Troy

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •