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Thread: Help With M70 300 WSM

  1. #1
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    Default Help With M70 300 WSM

    I could use a little help in diagnosing an accuracy problem with my rifle....

    I have a M70 Stainless Classic in 300 WSM. This is the one that comes with the 'plastic fantastic' stock. I bought the gun new, set it up with a Leupy 3 X 9 and set off for the range with a variety of handloads I worked up. None of my handloads grouped well. The loads were 180 grain TSXs and Accubonds. Thinking the flimsey stock was likely the problem, I bedded the stock, which stiffend everything up. I free floated the barrel. I then bought a box of Winchester factory ammo to see if for some reason the gun just didn't like the TSXs or Accubonds. I went to the range Saturday morning and it only took 5 shots to tell me that I haven't fixed the problem. I got about a 3 inch group at 100 yards from the bench. I do not believe the scope is moving, and I have the trigger set at about 3.5 pounds. I'm running out of ideas.... I still suspect the stock may be part of the problem, but I was pleased with my bedding job and I just don't believe that is the primary reason. The bolt does seem a little hard to open after I fire, so I starting thinking that might be a clue...but it's not stuck by any means it's just a little stiff.

    A couple of other theories I've entertained:

    Bad barrel
    Internal parts of the scope defective

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated... I was planning to take this gun on an Oct PWS hunt, but if I don't get this figured out by then I'll be leaving it at home.

  2. #2
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    How much of the barrel is floated?

    Some barrels do well with having the barrel touching for the first 4-6 inches from the action.

    Another technique is to apply pressure to the barrel at the end of the stock. Not much pressure just more than touching.

    Fully floating the barrel sometimes does not do well.

  3. #3

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    First couple of things I would do is find a *good* gunsmith and get it bore scoped and have him give it a look over. This will save ammo. Next would be to swap out scopes if you have another scope you are confident with. Maybe do the scope swap out first?

    A sticky bolt sounds like some over pressure. Are there any other pressure signs? Flattened primers, extractor marks, etc?

  4. #4
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    The barrel is fully floated.... I've read things about barrel resonance, but I don't really see it as an exact science or know much about how to judge the amount to float other than to try a few different setups and go shoot. I was hoping to find a less labor intensive solution. If anyone has a good strategy here I'm all ears...

    I do have another scope, and will try that. The problem here is I will have to remove it from another gun that is completely dialed in, but I guess that beats buying another scope for no good reason. The scope on the problem rifle is brand new, but I know that's no sure bet that it's not the issue.

    I thought the same about over pressure but couldn't find any sign of it with any of my handloads or the factory ammo. My handloads were all a couple of grains below max.

    Thanks for the advice

  5. #5

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    Before you remove the good scope on the dialed in rifle make a mark on your scope to a mark that aligns on the rings and you should be able to put it right back in the exact same spot, and also record your windage and elevation settings. 3 or 6 shots and you'll be dialed right back on zero.

  6. #6
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    If the chamber sticks with under max loads then the chamber is dirty and maybe your rifle just needs a good cleaning.

    Also book max can be over max in any individual rifle.

    Also adding forward pressure is as easy as putting a piece of plastic under the barrel or better yet go ahead a apply a tiny bit of epoxy to create a bump that the barrel will rest on when the stock is bolted back onto the action. If you use a temporary thing like a piece of plastic taped to the stock then if it doesn't work you dont have to make a permanent bump.

    If you do the epoxy bump and it does not work then just file it off.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advice...

    I'll add some temporary forward pressure and she how she does....

    If it works I'll probably use your epoxy suggestion to make it permenant....

    I'll post the results for future use incase anyone else encounters a similar problem with one of these rifles...

  8. #8

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    You should do one thing at a time or else you wont know what the problem/fix was. You might try the pressure point first and if it doesn't work, remove the shim and try the scope swap.

  9. #9
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    Just thought I would close the loop on this thread....

    I milled a small block of wood and installed it in the fore end of the stock to add foward pressure, but after it was all said and done I wasn't happy with the setup. It didn't seem to be to stable and despite my best efforts to design the block to fit properly I could tell it was moving around after I tightend everything down.

    I purchased a Hogue aftermarket stock that has aluminum pillars and I ordered a set of hex head screws to replace the factory ones from Midway. The gun dropped right in with minimal tweaking and the hex heads allowed me to securely tighten everything up. This solved the problem. I shot the rifle today and achieved half inch groups at 100 yards with factory ammo. I was getting about 3 inch groups before I did this. The only downside is the Hogue comes with a bit of a weight penalty, but all in all I'm very happy with it. It's got a soft rubber coating and its built really solid.

  10. #10

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    Great news, thanks for the update. It's always good to hear what the fix was. Lokk at the bright side of a heavier stock, at least it will take a little bite out of the recoil of the 300 WSM. 1/2" groups are great,,,cool

  11. #11
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Good job.

    Thanks for sharing.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  12. #12

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    My M70 FWT Classic in 300WSM likes pressure at the front of the forearm. After much experimenting with pieces of credit card, I put a spot of bedding behind the swivel nut. The rifle now shoots 3/8" groups at a 100 yards with my hunting load (less than an inch at 300 yards).

    Mike

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