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Thread: Baranoff island goat hunt?

  1. #1
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    Question Baranoff island goat hunt?

    This is my first post here and would like to say hi I am from Missouri and would like a get a little help with my upcoming hunt. Thank randy....


    I am going on a goat hunt in 2010.. Its on Baranoff island near Sitka, Alaska. The date is not set just yet. Was thinken maybe the 2nd week of October. The Guide is James E. Phillips #929. What should I expect on this hunt weather? terrain? any info will help a lot! What is a good rain gear to have for this hunt? What boots and how many? What is a good date for this kind of hunt? Thanks agen randy...

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    Thanks for the help..

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    Member RANGER RICK's Avatar
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    STA

    Welcome aboard.

    Don't jump the gun to soon ,a lot of people are on their own hunting trips this time of year and your post may go a week or longer without a response !!!!!!

    Congrats on your upcoming trip, sounds like fun.
    October hunt better have great rain gear ,I like HH Impertech(SP) .
    Good tough waterproof boots I also like cabelas Meindl Alaska Hunter .
    If your not in shape this is a good time to start .
    I would put about 40 plus pounds in your pack the one your going to use and start hitting the hills .

    Take your time with the guide and take lots of pictures.

    Good hunting STA.

    RR
    Practice does not make perfect !!!!!
    Perfect Practice makes perfect !!!!!!!!!!


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    RR, Just googled HH rain gear and it looks like some good stuff! Thank you!
    The boot I have are Lowa Sheep Hunters will this be ok? I have a bag of sand in my pack right now..lol... been hitting a big hill at the park, its a killer... Thanks agen randy...

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default eager beaver

    Man your really getting geaked about this hunt! I just got done with a Baranof island hunt......we rolled another one down.....7.5yr old billy.

    Two guys....one goat.

    The last day took us 11.5 hours to hit the beach.

    I've hunted them in October and November. You can expect them to be in the steep nasties among the trees and maybe up in the open if the weather isn't too bad. Keep in mind they can take alot more bad weather than you.

    Use your sheep hunters if you want.....and get really use to walking over off camber terrain.

    For training set up like 400 saw horses and alternate going over and under them with a 100# pack on a long set of stairs.

    Thats the warm up......

    Get ready for some serious Baranof island ass whoopin because your gonna need to move in October to take advantage of any good shots of weather that your blessed with.

    You got some serious time to get ready.....run, run, run and run some more

  6. #6
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    Default Rain gear

    I use Sitka Gear. Remember, every ounce counts. The good thing is that your guide will carry most of the weight, but you need to be physically and mentally prepared for what is coming your way. I used to live in Sitka and it will humble you quickly. Weather in Oct is hit or miss. Be prepared to be wet.

    It is awesome. I shot a 9.5 incher last year. Nov 11th.

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    Bighorse and juneausully

    Thanks for the post! The 400 saw horses training seem very tuff will do my best....

    Sitka Gear will get a good look!

    First thing I think is for me to get in the best shape I can. Have been hitting it hard already. Im 33 years old 5' 11" 200lb. My goal is 180lb and to be able to walk 5 to 6 hours with a 40lb pack... Last night I had 90lb in my pack and it just about killed me was only able to hit the hill at the park for 50 min... I have a long way to go......

  8. #8
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    I lived in Sitka for many years and also guided some goat hunts there. The weather will probably be wet. I suggest just good Helly Hanson or Grundens rain gear. I have bought and used all the fancy rain wear that they sell for hunting and you just can't beat good old high quality Hellys or grundens. If your basing your hunt from the beach you'll want some good waterproof boots like XTRA Tuffs. you can buy the rain gear and boots in Sitka at the fishing supply store Murray Pacific. For climbing I prefer Koflachs but that is my own personal choice. Also expect to sweat alot climbing; so some good poly or "wicking type" clothing is best as well as layering cloths. Good LUCK. That Baranof goat hunting is truely my favorite of all the hunting that I do. When you get your billy you'll have deserved it. Try your best to be in shape.

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    Quote Originally Posted by martenpine View Post
    For climbing I prefer Koflachs but that is my own personal choice. Also expect to sweat alot climbing.
    Holy crap Im going to have to climb? Man this hunt is getting tuffer everyday I have never climb before will have to talk with the Outfitter about this...

  10. #10
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Climbing for Goats

    I was once accompanied on a Goat hunt with a young scrapper's first hunt.
    We got up in the scrags and I got nervous. I asked how he was doing "no problem" he said. Man, your quite the mountain climber I said.
    His reply " I climbed a 50' hill in Louisiana one time"
    We ended up seperating when I said "that's it for me"
    OK, give me 15 minutes to check out that spiral. I waited 2 + hours, when he did'nt return I made a decision to go down the "other side" as I knew I could not go the way we had come.
    I got back in the dark some 7 hours later. He was at camp. What took you so long? After 10 minutes I decided to SLIDE down and got back here at 1PM.What about our plan to meet in 15 minutes I said? Oh, I knew you'd find your way back.
    Needless to say, that was OUR first and last hunt together.
    Goat hunting is a team effort, you need each other.

  11. #11
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default understand

    I guess what he's saying is your ablility to climb will influence your ability to score on the perfect goat. There are multiple groups among the mountains here and just because you climb and find some goats doesn't mean your gonna have a great billy in the mix. Therefore your next move involves decending often back to sea level and back up into another section of mountain that may be many miles across various rugged terrain only to begin another climb. That is of course if your guide feels your up-to-it and safety is not compromised. Alot of guys have the personal drive to keep going beyond what their bodies are capable of. Once you start stumbling around it's time to stop all forward motion and regroup for safety.

    I think this is a major component to sheep too. Sometimes that full curl just isn't in the mix and if your gonna score a serious heart felt drive to the next ridge is needed.

    Something to think about.....in Oct. many of the finest Billilies have been located and your in for a challenge finding one. This year as of last week six billies have been taken since Aug 1st. The large ones are often located in the early season when the open alpine can be used.

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    Never did any vertical climbing with ropes and gear. Maybe getting in over my head. Will do the best I can, and will be in good physical shape for the hunt. The date is not set in stone. Thinken September mite be better for me...

  13. #13
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Sept

    If you can gravitate towards Sept. The hides can be great mid-late sept. Oct. is the best though without question.

    It depends on your priorities. If your a hard core trophy hunter get an Oct. goat. If your just wanting a goat to round out your personal hunting experiences lean towards Sept.

    Your loosing like 6 minutes of daylight every day in Sept. The difference of one month is noticable here.

  14. #14
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    Cork (caulk) boots are also required reading for all my Goat hunters !!!!

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    Bighorse and muskeg,

    Losing 6 minutes of daylight every day in Sept is some good INFO as I had no idea it was that much!


    Cork (caulk) boots maybe just the ticket. muskeg I see you have goat hunts your self as a outfitter so your opinion means a lot...

    thanks randy....

  16. #16
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    Yes corks are a good idea, I cork all my hunting/climbing boots. I guided w/ 1 of muskegs guides on goat hunts for a differant guide and he sold me on corks. He used X-tra tuffs that are corked, I have and use a pair but mostly for ice use, they really do not have the ankle support (at least for me) when climbing. A easy solution that I do to all my boots is buy some snowmobile cleats, I use them to cork the tracks of my snowmahine and cork my boots with them. Just get a good pair of boots w/ good ankle support and cork them using your drill and a bit. You can buy similiar corks for shoes from ORVIS but they are not as aggressive. Or if you want have them professionally corked. I even cork my wader boots ect.. so as not to slip on the wet coastal rock while bear hunting.

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