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Thread: Things that work

  1. #1
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    Default Things that work

    Hilleberg!!!! I'd never heard of Hilleberg tents until I read about them here. I just spent a week in a Jannu in hard rain and the tent performed great. It took a while to figure out the venting but once we did there was no condensation and not a drop of leakage. This tent is easy to set-up and easy to stow. It weighs in at under 6#. I'm very impressed.

    Mammut Champ pants. Expensive, and worth every penny. Light, comfortable, and quick drying. I lived in them for the week. Not initially, but once I put them on there was no reason to change!

    REI Sub-Kilo +20* down sleeping bag. On sale a couple of weeks ago @ $169.00. Under 2#, comfy as heck, and plenty warm. It compresses to ridiculously small in an extra small compression sack. A week of rain and there was never a hint of any moisture problem, even when I wore wet socks to bed to dry them out and the first couple of nights before I figured out the Hilleberg venting and had condensation inside the tent. No problems, no regrets.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Mr. Pid: which tent do you have? I have the Nallo 4 GT and have all the same compliments for it. I would add that the Nallo 4 ct is ENOUMOUS and only ~7lbs!

    I have found the In-Genious socks to be fantastic, especially when you are wearing one pair for multiple days. I have put 3 days of hard hiking on one pair and they still fit properly and suprisingly did not smell as vile as one would expect... I have found many great gear items but this is the one that lets me go farther than all the rest. Coupled with my Kenetrek Mtn boots and I have way over 100 miles including 10+ with them full of water and so far NO BLISTERS!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Hilleberg!!!! I'd never heard of Hilleberg tents until I read about them here. I just spent a week in a Jannu in hard rain and the tent performed great. It took a while to figure out the venting but once we did there was no condensation and not a drop of leakage. This tent is easy to set-up and easy to stow. It weighs in at under 6#. I'm very impressed.
    What do you think of the vestibule on that Jannu? Will it hold 2 packs, 2 pair of boots and still have room to fire up a stove to boil water?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    The vestibule is smallish, but adequate for my use. Boots, coats, hats, etc were no problem. I have a weatherproof pack cover so I leave that outside. Boiling water wouldn't be a problem but we had a tent cloth shelter that we erected with our trekking poles so it wasn't an important detail. The Jannu has the most room inside the tent of any of the 2-man Hillebergs. That detail was important to me. More so than the vestibule. Overall weight and ease to set up were also very important. I can set this tent up very quickly by myself even in wind and rain.

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    Default Cooking in Hilleberg Jannu

    Spent a total of 14 days guiding 2 sheep hunters in my Jannu. Second hunt was 7 days of constant rain, so I learned how to cook in the vestibule. To cook in the vestibule, #1 make sure it is vented well. #2 push your sleeping pad, bag, and personal gear in to the back 5 feet of the tent. #3 unhook the inner body at the front, along front edges, and along the top front edge along the vestibule. #4 Peel inner body back 2 feet. Voila! You now have created a "GT" style vestibule with room to cook in your Jannu. Cook, enjoy the extra headroom created by unhooking the top of the inner body, and laugh at the crappy weather outside!

    As PID said, the Jannu is easy to set up, bomber, good ventilation when tweaked, and lets you use your ultralight down bag with zero risk. I just put my pack in a contractor bag outside the tent. No need to have it inside with me.

    Jannu gets 5 stars by me.

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    Default 3/4 ragg wool gloves

    In stark contrast to the $600 dollar hilleberg tents, as always, I lived in my $5.95 ragg wool 3/4 fingerless (and thumbless) gloves. I'll never hunt in the mountains (or go steelhead fishing) without them!

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I came across a great tent when the BombShelter is too big and the Jannu too small. I bought a Eureka K2 XT 3 man dome style tent this year. This tent is fantastic.

    The venting design is great. By unzipping various side panels to reveal the bug mesh you can go from a toasty warm 4 season tent to a breezy 3 season tent and everything in between. Even with all the vents zipped up I had no condensation on the inside of the rain fly. The two tiny "eyebrow" vents in the rain fly allowed no rain to blow in, but vented all the moist air out. I had zero condensation on the 12 days I have used this tent this year. Of those 12 days, 10 were in the rain.

    The vestibule is plent big for two packs and two pair of boots, plus room to cook. The hoop design of the vestibule kept most of the rain water from running off on you when you opened it up, unlike my other Eureka tent that dumps it down your collar when unzip the vestibule opening.

    The floor is roomy enough for three guys to sleep and downright luxurious for two guys. On my Kodiak trip I was able to fit two "double" sized Coleman air mattresses in it with no problem. Just enough room to get the rifle in beside the bed and a few other personal items. The tent has HUGE organization pockets that made it really handy to hold books, flashlights, and other personal items.

    I've only tested the tent up to one two hour stretch of 40mph winds. The tent didn't move. It hardly vibrated. It is super stable.

    One of the items I liked about the tent that many would not like is it's yellow color. It was easy to find in the fog of Kodiak and it collected light like none of my other tents are able to. Reading inside the tent during the Kodiak fog and storm was easy without a flashlight. The bright color played a big part in keeping my from going stir crazy when I was stuck inside it.

    I look forward to testing it out this winter. It will make a great snowmobile, boat, airplane or rafting tent. I was able to buy it from an Ebay store for $300 plus shipping.

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