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Thread: Peep Sights

  1. #1
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Peep Sights

    When I bought my 375 H&H this past spring the previous owner send me a NECG Peep Sight for the Leupold QRW mounts. Peep sight looks like it would be a good backup sighting system.
    Just wondering if anyone has a peep sight mounted on their rifle, or has one for backup or has actually had to use a peep sight while out on a hunt? Thanks

  2. #2

    Default peep sight

    my son hunts with a peep and it is a great way to hunt it makes your rifle light and once its sighted in it will work well I have a peep back up on my sako and really like it

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    When I bought my 375 H&H this past spring the previous owner send me a NECG Peep Sight for the Leupold QRW mounts. Peep sight looks like it would be a good backup sighting system.
    Just wondering if anyone has a peep sight mounted on their rifle, or has one for backup or has actually had to use a peep sight while out on a hunt? Thanks
    I use peeps extensively, but not as a "backup" on a scoped rifle. If I was going to do that I'd prefer one of the old Redfields with a pushbutton release for mounting and dismounting the peep riser from the base block. Instead of a backup peep on a scoped rifle, I always pack a second peep sighted rifle on trips as a backup. Even when your own scoped rifle doesn't fail, it's handy to have a spare rifle in camp. When the weather goes south or the game moves into the thick stuff, I'll happily pick up the peep sighted rifle as my primary arm and leave the scoped gun in camp.

    One of the real secrets to using a peep is not using the whole front bead as your aiming point. It really covers a lot as range stretches. If you sight in using the top edge of the bead as your aiming point, it's possible to still see (and hit) very small targets or long range targets. I grew up hunting in peep sight country, and all the old timers used them. You wouldn't believe the long distances that they could hit with their peep sights while retaining the advantage of peeps for fast shooting in tight cover. I watched a couple of these guys in an impromptu shooting contest at gallon paint cans full of water at about 150 yards to decide which shooter and gun (300 Savage in M99 vs same in 308) was better. We ran out of paint cans before anyone missed to decide the issue.

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    I haven't used a peep sight too much for hunting, but one thing I have noticed in general is that they are much harder to use than a scope when it starts to get dark out. That tiny little hole doesn't let much light through. A "ghost ring" sight, rather than a true peep, might help this. Another thing I personally feel is that, even at close range, a peep (or any iron sight for that matter) is really not any faster than a low power scope. Some may disagree with this, but with iron sights, you have to worry about multiple focal planes, and aligning 3 different points in space to get an accurate shot. With a scope, the crosshairs are in the same plane as the target, so you just line up the two and boom.

    That said, I think the peep sight designed to fit the QRW rings is a great idea. I have been looking for something like that to put on a muzzleloader, as I hunt in multiple states--some that allow scopes on muzzleloaders and some that don't. I think that would be an ideal answer to that problem. I also like the idea of having it as a backup should your scope fail. It would be light, easy to carry in a pack, and with the QRW option, easy to install in the field. But if you plan to do this, make sure you practice with it beforehand...

  5. #5
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    I have this NECG aperature sight on my 411 rifle. It is mounted on Weaver Grand Slam (all steel) bases and is really more of a primary sight than a backup, though that was the original thinking. It comes with two aperatures, I don't know the exact size of each but the smaller one would be too small for quick acquisition, with my eye anyway, as a hunting sight but the larger would be fine. It is a solid made steel sight with full adjustments and is easily detached with just one thumb knob. The knob has loosened slightly but is easy to monitor and keep tight. This is on a rifle that delivers more than 4500 ft lbs of energy so that isn't too bad. If it were to be on for a hunt where reliability was more important a dab of lock-tite would fix it in place.

    It does serve well as a primary sight and it can be carried in your pocket with detachable scope mounts on these bases and it will keep its zero on and off again. Probably an important attribute for a detachable backup sight. Like all aperature sights it works better with a square front post and should be sighted in for POI at the top of the post. As BrownBear said, don't cover the target. I am a dedicated six o'clock holder from the bullseye pistol days and it is quick and natural for me. My rifle has a NECG front ramp with interchangable posts and I use a sourdough (square) front with it.

    Of all the aperature sights out there for bolt action rifles I would rate this one the best for ruggedness and actual usefulness as a backup sight. It does seem to stick up a bit but with the correct front sight selection you won't need to adjust it up too much and this would help. I had a front that was too tall at first and had to adjust it up to compensate. A shorter front sight post remedied the problem. All in all, in keeping with the Chinese spirit, I'd give it about a 9.5.
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    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Would work better than a scope for upclose and quick shots.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Peep sights are not good in low light situations. For backup use during daylight they are excellent. But in evening or morning you would be better off with open sights. I have had raindrops in the peep that I had to blow out before I could shoot. For all around backup go with open sights.
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  8. #8
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    I love peep sights and have hunted with them for years. The only rifle I currently own with a peep is my 30-30. I have pretty good eyesight, so I haven't noticed much of a problem with them in low light situations, but I can see how it might be a problem for some.
    The last thing I killed using a peep was a cinnamon bear. It was about 20 yards away and not flat out running, but moving right along. I threw the rifle up, tracked the bear as he moved, and got 2 shots through the boiler room within about 1" of each other as fast as I could work the lever. Not saying I couldn't have done it with a scope, but it was quick and felt natural with the peep.

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by MARV1 View Post
    Would work better than a scope for upclose and quick shots.
    You're right Marv, and if one wants to enhance it ever more, put a small dia. fiber optic on front...now you have something that stands out and easier to see in low light conditions.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    I have a MAS Model 45 22 cal rifle with a peep sight, ramp adjusts from 30 to 150 meters. I am guessing my eyesight is not as good as it used to be because when I looked through the aperature it is a little blurry, front sight was clear and very defined though.
    Just sighting through the peep sight I can see that their may be some advantages to using a peep sight due to the fact that you can see more of your target, would be especailly important if you were being charged by a bear.
    I grew up using open sighted rifles, most of my sights were filed down to a small v, I always thought that they had very fast sight acquisition. I am guessing that if a person had some time to practice with the peep sight that it would be just as good as any iron sight out there, maybe even better.

  11. #11

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    I have a MAS Model 45 22 cal rifle with a peep sight, ramp adjusts from 30 to 150 meters. I am guessing my eyesight is not as good as it used to be because when I looked through the aperature it is a little blurry, front sight was clear and very defined though.
    Just sighting through the peep sight I can see that their may be some advantages to using a peep sight due to the fact that you can see more of your target, would be especailly important if you were being charged by a bear.
    I grew up using open sighted rifles, most of my sights were filed down to a small v, I always thought that they had very fast sight acquisition. I am guessing that if a person had some time to practice with the peep sight that it would be just as good as any iron sight out there, maybe even better.
    Whether one prefers a peep or not, I think there must have been a reason why most (all?) of older military rifles have peep instead of open. Any thoughts?
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  12. #12

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    take a drill bit and open up the peep hole a bit, try the next number size drill bit up fromt he closest fit. Openint the hole a bit will clear up the spider webs...It's goo you can focus clearly on the front front sight

  13. #13
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maydog View Post
    Whether one prefers a peep or not, I think there must have been a reason why most (all?) of older military rifles have peep instead of open. Any thoughts?

    I have often marvelled at why the peep had not retained popularity over open "V" irons? I think it is because, as scopes became popular it was cheaper to put on open V sights (AND MORE PRACTICAL). Now of course scopes are so popular that they don't even put any irons on, a shame.

    As someone mentioned earlier open V type sights require the shooter to focus on 3 planes (the rear V, the front sight, and the target).

    Peep sights only require the shooter to focus on 2 planes (the front sight and the target). When you look though the peep there is no focusing required.

    Not all young men in the military have perfect vision. Looking though a peep only allows the parellel rays of light to enter the eye and back to the retina (the back of the eye where the light rays focus). This phenomenon sharpens the visual acuity of the shooter with near sightedness. Hence, the front sight and the target will appear much sharper (in focus) as compared a V type rear sight. For any of you guys that have developed near sightedness (meaning you wear glasses to see better when looking past 20 feet or so) and loved your open sights but don't want to swicth to a scope, try a peep! However, the better option, in my opinion, is to wear contacts if you can.

    In opposition to what was opined earlier, I think a low powered scope is faster in target aquisition than open sights (if the shooter practices with a scope). All my rifles are set up as should be---when I shoulder my rifle with eys open or closed the cross hairs are there, with no readjusting. Meaning, no raising or lowering the cheek, no creeping or fading the eye to or from the scope. If you have to do this the scope is too high, low, forward, or rearward respectively.

  14. #14
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i have a peep for my .416 that i've used when my scope was getting repaired at leupold, back up a bear at 120 with it, didn't like it at all, hit the bear but as mentioned above its hard to tell what your shooting at if its moving much and you need to take a snap shot. up close i'd rather have my scope than a peep, unless a peep is all your used to using, but when you need a close fast shot, your scope will work just as well.
    roll a tennis ball on the ground and try to get on it with a scope, then with a peep...scope will make you happy.
    That being said, i'm glad i have a back up sight...its on at 60 yards +/- and about 230 and i shoot it that far as well....good to have if you ask me.
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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Red-Dot or Holographic as backup

    Anyone ever use a red-dot or holographic sight as their backup?

  16. #16
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    I am having a cocking-piece (ala Rigby), mounted peep made for my .425 W-R, and hope to use it extensively.
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  17. #17
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default another factor

    One other thing to consider in favor of the low powered scope for fast, up close action is the fact that when the adrenaline is pumping (as it would be if you were getting charged by a bear), you tend to get tunnel vision and focus only on the threat. This of course would mean you would not focus and take the time to line up the iron sights (peep or open). But with a scope properly situated as described by Eastwoods, the scope will be directly in front of your eye, and the crosshairs will be on the same plane as the threat, so you will be more apt to line it up properly. This phenomenon has been realized by the military today. That is why you see most of the M4's set up with some type of optics. The Marines did a study on this and the percentage of hits with optics was way higher than with the standard peep sight on the M4/M16. If I recall correctly, one Marine General said the addition of the ACOG to the Leathernecks' rifles was the greatest improvement in combat since the introduction of the M1 Garand.

  18. #18

    Default red dot on 45/70

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    Anyone ever use a red-dot or holographic sight as their backup?
    I have a Leupold Red Dot on my Marlin 45-70 Guide Gun. I have used it on Moose and Bear hunts with great success. I like the fact that the sight is a fast acquire sight if I'm rushed in the brush by a bear and the red dot is not turned on. I always carry an extra battery, but haven't needed it yet. It is on it's third season. I think that Leupold may not have this sight in their line anymore though.

  19. #19
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Arent red dot and holographics illegal in Alaska. Per artificial lights for hunting.

    I had a peep sight on my 458 it was great. I could shoot 3-4 inch groups at 100 yards.

    I did not have any problem seeing through it in low light. It was a Williams with no aperture in it so it was a big hole.
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    Arent red dot and holographics illegal in Alaska. Per artificial lights for hunting.

    I had a peep sight on my 458 it was great. I could shoot 3-4 inch groups at 100 yards.

    I did not have any problem seeing through it in low light. It was a Williams with no aperture in it so it was a big hole.

    This sight doesn't project any light Leupold gilmore red dot.

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