Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Towing Limitations

  1. #1

    Post Towing Limitations

    How much can my truck tow? That is a good question since the truck manufacturers do not make this readily apparent to the buyer. Let's use a Ford F250 diesel with automatic transmission as an example of the tow vehicle. Ford says that it can tow 12,500 lbs with conventional towing and 15,500 with 5th-wheel towing. The factory tow bar hitch that Ford provides on the truck says 6,000 lbs weight carrying and 12,000 lbs weight distribution max loads. The F250 is rated at 23,000 lbs gross combined weight rating (GCWR) and it weighs about 7500 lbs with driver and canopy and trailer equipment in the bed. So, that leaves us with the 15,500 weight carrying capacity.

    So, you remove the factory tow bar hitch and replace it with a Putnam XDR Class 5 hitch with a 15,000 lbs weight carrying and 16,000 weight distribution rating. Then you purchase a heavy duty trunnion weight distribution system rated at 15,000 and weight distribution shank and you are much improved for towing your boat.

    Now, let's say that our boat weighs a nominal 9,000 lbs with the engines. We have to add our 270 gallons of fuel (at 6.3 lbs/gal) which equals 1700 lbs. We also want to add the weight of the fresh water onboard, 35 times 8.3 lbs/gal which equals 290 lbs. We also add a minimum of 10% of the boat weight for equipment which would be 900 lbs. The trailer might weigh an optimistic 3000 lbs if we don't add a lot of options. So our total for towed weight is 14,890 lbs and we are legal. We could be better in capability if the boat weighed a little less, but very few people ever weigh their boats, because sometimes it is better not to know. When you apply and receive a oversize permit from the State, you will have to weigh your truck and trailer at the Weigh Station and you might get a surprise.

    By the way, weight distribution systems really add a lot of stability to pulling a heavy load, like a boat.

    On Order: 30 x 10.5 GC with twin Suzuki DF300's.

  2. #2

    Default Weight Distribution

    What I've heard is that you are not supposed to use weight distribution systems with a boat trailer.

    Has to do with taking wieght off the truck axles at times when it is needed.
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  3. #3

    Default

    I have heard the same thing from some sources, however, I have a close friend who tows a fairly heavy boat using a weight distribution system with great success and I know of others who use and recommend the same towing method. If you use the recommended 7% of towed weight on the tongue, you are still applying 1000 lbs on the hitch with 15,000 lbs of boat and trailer. The weight distribution system seems to be very stable reducing the bouncing action of the road surface and even reducing the side-to-side sway.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dtol View Post
    What I've heard is that you are not supposed to use weight distribution systems with a boat trailer.

    Has to do with taking wieght off the truck axles at times when it is needed.
    Not exactly true....but used to be so. However, it was more because of the surge brake system than anything else. Lots of manufactures have distribution systems for boats now. Go to any of their web sites and they will tell you how great they are.

  5. #5

    Default Trailer

    Sounds true. However I know that 6-Roblies won't put one on.
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  6. #6
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,425

    Default

    Get the triple axle trailer. The only draw back is tight turns and finding the prefect hitch height. I recommend setting the trailer up yourself using the local scales. Also get the electric over hydraulic vented disk brake setup. The disks are easier to flush then drums and the electric over hydraulic elminates the hurky, jerky of surge brakes. This system also makes backing down a steep ramp no big deal. None of the surge brake issues for backing either.

    I have a 2859 Bayliner and with Crew Cab DRW F350 Diesel I cross the scales over 21,000 full loaded with family, dogs, gear, fuel, food and water. The boat and trailer chime in at almost 13,000 lbs. I am close to 1200 lbs on the hitch. I was shooting for 10%.

  7. #7

    Default

    Denny,

    That is interesting. But, I have found them goofy in other areas too. Like not carrying a high-lift boat trailer jack due to some b.s. reason that made absolutely no sense.....I bet they put one on wrong once, or out of the luck of the draw got a bad one, and paid dearly for it. I can't blame them. So, now no equalizer hitches for anybody else.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    Get the triple axle trailer. The only draw back is tight turns and finding the prefect hitch height. I recommend setting the trailer up yourself using the local scales. Also get the electric over hydraulic vented disk brake setup. The disks are easier to flush then drums and the electric over hydraulic elminates the hurky, jerky of surge brakes. This system also makes backing down a steep ramp no big deal. None of the surge brake issues for backing either.

    I have a 2859 Bayliner and with Crew Cab DRW F350 Diesel I cross the scales over 21,000 full loaded with family, dogs, gear, fuel, food and water. The boat and trailer chime in at almost 13,000 lbs. I am close to 1200 lbs on the hitch. I was shooting for 10%.
    I have a dually too....there is nothing like it. Single axle guys always tell me how better there trucks are - skinnier, easier to park, 2 less tires to buy......But, I wouldn't trade my dually. It is so much better for towing and hauling especially really heavy loads.

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Dupont Spinner View Post
    Also get the electric over hydraulic vented disk brake setup. The disks are easier to flush then drums and the electric over hydraulic elminates the hurky, jerky of surge brakes. This system also makes backing down a steep ramp no big deal. None of the surge brake issues for backing either.
    I agree with Dupont Spinner. I failed to mention that it is really important to get electric/hydraulic disk brakes to use the equalizer hitch setup and get rid of the surge brakes for a boat and trailer of these weights. When your towed rig weighs more than the truck, it is time to have electric/hydraulic brakes which can stop the whole unit by themselves even going down Turnagain Pass.

  10. #10
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    I have a dually too....there is nothing like it. Single axle guys always tell me how better there trucks are - skinnier, easier to park, 2 less tires to buy......But, I wouldn't trade my dually. It is so much better for towing and hauling especially really heavy loads.

    I have 2 duallies and I don't think I would ever go back to a single wheeled truck for hauling anything.

    If anyone needs a hand with an electric over hydraulic setup...pm me. I have done a few installs. If you ever find the need to replace your surge system you may find that the cost difference is not that much.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •