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Thread: releasing shrimp with eggs

  1. #1

    Default releasing shrimp with eggs

    Last time out as we were releasing the shrimp with eggs - noticed that some of them were just lifelessly falling - does anyone know if they are surviving? how long can they be out of water - ect. ect. seems like the right thing to do, releasing the ones with eggs, but if they are not survivng - I could eat them! The pregnant ones are usually the big ones too.

    thoughts?

  2. #2
    Member Soundfisher's Avatar
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    Talking

    If you keep that up, you won't be able to "Work the rail' anymore.

  3. #3

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    I'm not sure the answer to that, but i have a hard time believing a shrimp can survive after coming up 400-600 feet, then falling back down the same distance. Something might eat it on the way down anyway. That beind said, i sometimes throw them back too.

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    Default I release them

    into a big pot of boiling water.

  5. #5
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    My releasing technique sounds very similar to Muskie's.....

  6. #6
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    ALL large spot prawns are female. Anything with a carapace length of over 3.3cm is female.

    P. platyceros is easily shocked, and once they go through the freshwater lens, they have to be handled very carefully to keep them alive. Releasing them probably results in a free meal for some predator as the mostly helpless shrimp free-falls slowly towards the bottom.

    If it still makes you uncomfortable killing the egg-laden females, fish them in the spring when they are egg-free.

  7. #7

    Default thanks!

    I guess they are so lively in the boat I didnt think about all the trauma they went thru on the way up -

    thanks for the replies

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    ALL large spot prawns are female. Anything with a carapace length of over 3.3cm is female.

    P. platyceros is easily shocked, and once they go through the freshwater lens, they have to be handled very carefully to keep them alive. Releasing them probably results in a free meal for some predator as the mostly helpless shrimp free-falls slowly towards the bottom.

    If it still makes you uncomfortable killing the egg-laden females, fish them in the spring when they are egg-free.
    Brings a question to mind. Is there a difference in killing and eating a female in the spring that has the potential to lay eggs, and killing and eating a female that currently has eggs? I suppose that by doing the latter, the female doesn't just have the potential to have eggs but actually does have eggs.

    No shrimp (or crab) that I've caught in my pots and been thrown back or fell back into the water has ever seemed to move any once it's in the water. 600 feet is a long way to slowly fall without getting eaten by something.

  9. #9
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    I don't have a URL for it right now, but in the past I have found a Fish and Game study where they were tracking the growth rate of shrimp. They were catching shrimp in pots at around 4-600 feet, tagging them and releasing them and then documenting when they caught again and how much there size had changed. Since they are able to do this over an extended periond of time, this tells me that quite a few of them are making it back down, and that they must not migrate too far.

    Jim

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    I don't have a URL for it right now, but in the past I have found a Fish and Game study where they were tracking the growth rate of shrimp. They were catching shrimp in pots at around 4-600 feet, tagging them and releasing them and then documenting when they caught again and how much there size had changed. Since they are able to do this over an extended periond of time, this tells me that quite a few of them are making it back down, and that they must not migrate too far.

    Jim
    Now that's interesting.....I was going with the 'keep them all' method until I read this.

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