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Thread: Yukon River questions

  1. #1
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    Default Yukon River questions

    During summer months, how fast is the current from Dawson City to the sea?
    Are there any nav hazards beyond Dawson City?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    The NRS web site has hosted a trip blog down the Yukon by Ray Zvirbulis. Go to www.nrsweb.com and type Ray Zvirbulis into the sites search window to read all the entries (there are a bunch). I think this one covers some of the area you're interested in.

    http://www.nrsweb.com/services/newsl...tory_0208a.asp

  3. #3
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Yukon River current averages 6-8mph in summer. You can generally do forty miles per day, depending on winds and weather. Frow Dawson to the Bering is about 1400 miles I think.

    Only navigability issues relate to Yukon Flats where the river is very wide with hundreds of islands, so there is no clear channel per se to choose, but with raft or canoe it isn't really an issue as you still move downstream and eventually hook back up with main channel(s).

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    Thanks very much for the previous replies.

    I have a couple of more questions:
    1- Is catching fish (for food) between mid June and mid August by either trolling or flinging a line from the islands considered a no-brainer, or is true skill/luck and time involved?
    2- How reasonable is it to plan on getting drinking/cooking water from the Yukon on a float or paddle trip? Does the silt set in hours or days before filtering is possible? Does this vary from one section to another?
    3- What is the water temperature durng this time period? I'm thinking of purposes for mild refrigeration.

  5. #5

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    i don't know about the fishing.

    as far fresh water goes. the best thing to do is plan ahead. bring some extra containers, maybe one of those 5 gallon collapseable jugs, there are lots of clear streams entering the yukon for the vast majority of the way. you may have some more of a challenge finding streams in the flats. but, again plane ahead.

    if you have some pots you can let them sit over night and most of the silt will settle out.

    i you use a filter like msr waterworks or something like http://www.rei.com/product/695265
    you can just pump directly from the river water without letting it settle. your pump will clog after a couple quarts of so, but with these pumps all you need do is clean the filter (a 5 minute task) and you are back to pumping.

    with re to water temps.... its going to vary greatly. as you are floating down the middle of the river you'll have fairly cold water. but, if you eddy out at some island odds are good you'll be off the main current and the water there will be warmer. one fish study i saw that measure surface water temps had a range of 55 to 60 F that's surface. the deeper you go the colder. if all you are doing is floating in a raft and oaring to pick a channel then the drag of submerged item may not be a big deal. if you plan to oar or paddle continously i suspect it would be different story.

    then there is the issue of safety. the thought of something dragging behind my boat, underwater, waiting to get snagged in a deadman and INSTANTLY swamp my boat is not worth risk.

    -mike

  6. #6
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Filtering silty water

    You might try boiling your water instead of filtering; boiling expands the water molecules and a lot of the silt drops out to the bottom of the pot. Let it cool overnight. Of course boiling also kills ghiardia and crypto.

    I would still bring a filter and use it to save fuel by filtering from clear tributaries.

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    Is there an established put-in/take-out at the Yukon/Dalton bridge?
    If so, can rafts, canoes and people overnight there?

    I'm thinking that Fairbanks would be the least expensive place to resupply.

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    Default US Mail

    You may want to look into using the US Mail system for supplies? You can mail up to 70 pounds. You could mail supplies to most villages along the river and should be able to get new supplies at least once a week as you travel down the river.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rider View Post
    Is there an established put-in/take-out at the Yukon/Dalton bridge?
    If so, can rafts, canoes and people overnight there?

    I'm thinking that Fairbanks would be the least expensive place to resupply.

  9. #9
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    A run down to Sam's Club might be easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by bitterroot_montana View Post
    You may want to look into using the US Mail system for supplies? You can mail up to 70 pounds. You could mail supplies to most villages along the river and should be able to get new supplies at least once a week as you travel down the river.

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