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Thread: What type of rest?

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default What type of rest?

    What do you prefer for a shooting rest in the field? Do you like the shooting sticks or perfer a bipod on the the rifle? What are some of the considerations that should be taken into account?

  2. #2

    Default Humble Opinion

    A bipod and/or shooting sticks have converted me from an average shot to a much, much better hunting shot. Perhaps it is partially a confidence factor, but knowing that I will have a solid rest relaxes me greatly when trying to control my wavering crosshairs. Personally, I always have a Harris bipod adorned to my rifle. In fact, I use a length that fits me correctly for prone shooting only. I also carry shooting sticks for sitting shots as prone is not always feasible. Why not use a length of bipod that I can use for both prone and sitting positions? Simply, my body size is such that there is no model that allows both. And, I personally do not like shooting off a bipod from a sit as you usually do not have enough time to adjust the height and still be able to lock your elbows into your knees. The shooting sticks are instantaneous as height is adjusted by simply spreading the legs. Yes, there are weight and potential balance factors (for standing off hand shots--last resort) but for me it is well worth it. I have been fortunate to hunt Alaska twice for Dall Sheep taking a great ram (39 1/8 X 14 1/8) in 2004, and during those hunts I found no inconvenience with either the bipod or the sticks in my pack. In South Africa this summer, I took 18 different species, of which 12 were taken off the bipod or sticks.

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Shooting stability...

    My client-hunters have used shooting sticks from a sitting position two times. My client-hunters have used bipods, shooting prone two times. Myself and my client-hunters have shot prone off my backpack and harvested game more that two hundred times.

    Clearly, I'm a "off-the-backpack" type of hunter/guide.

    Dennis Byrne
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

  4. #4

    Talking monopod

    I prefer the Stoney Point mono pod, especially in steep, and , or brushy terrain. I have mine preadjusted that works for most situations, and far shots usually allow for more adjustments to allow sitting or kneeling. It comes with a removable rubber tip with a titanium tip underneath, that allows it to be used as a walking stick also. It's very strong and light and I consider it one of my most important hunting items...I won't leave home without it.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  5. #5
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    Default hiking sticks work the same

    as "shooting" sticks, plus they're more help when you have to pack meat.
    I cross the sticks, then loop the wrist loops over the other stick & spread to suit. They can be used standing or sitting - prone & I'm resting over the pack, too.
    It's easy to get caught up in all sorts of gadgets that will make you a better shot. practice works for making you a better shot.
    Gary

  6. #6
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Default

    My AR came with a bipod, but I don't use it. I shoot freehand.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  7. #7
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    My client-hunters have used shooting sticks from a sitting position two times. My client-hunters have used bipods, shooting prone two times. Myself and my client-hunters have shot prone off my backpack and harvested game more that two hundred times.

    Clearly, I'm a "off-the-backpack" type of hunter/guide.

    Dennis Byrne
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

    I prefer off-the-backpack too. I also do a hasty sling to help steady things up a bit too. I've found that bipods are great for varmint/predator shooting, but are just a general pain in the arse for big game hunting. I've never used or even seen a set of shooting sticks up close, but I suspect having to pack and carry another item in the field is a pain in the arse too.
    Now what ?

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