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Thread: Somedays...

  1. #1
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Somedays...

    What a day! An oldtimer, actually, the Dad of one my schoolmates from decades ago, comes in, says he's sold off his small ranch operation and is moving to Arizona. Were we interested in some guns he pulled out from under his bed?...I came home with a 1936 manufactured Savage 99R, .300 Savage with Lyman Alaskan in Stith mount all in an Idaho Leather Co. scabbard. All period stuff, most likely, according to the fella, purchased on the same day. Typical buttstock crack through grip, easily repaired, rest of the rifle shows much use from being hauled around the mountains along the Idaho/Montana border elk hunting. He mentioned one of his last hunts where he'd just pulled the scabbard off the rig, but when he went to take the brand spanking new saddle off, the horse took off headed for Canada, and never was recovered. He mentioned that it might've gone home with a tag on it's ear in the back of a pickup with California plates......
    The second one I picked up is an absolutely ancient Browning A5. No prefix five digit serial number in the 77K range. Stock and forearm split several ways, but all repairable. Much metal wear, but mechanically sound, no damage, and perfect bore interior. He mentioned that the shotgun was purchased new here in town by his Father, but didn't recall when.
    Not often that I run across interesting stuff like this with an indisputable provenance. Told him I'd take care of them as if they had been in my own family all those years.
    Both came home for $300.00. I might have trouble sleeping tonight......

  2. #2

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    Man, those stories are priceless. Get em written down while they're fresh and pass them along with the guns when your kids inherit! Cuzz I bet you never let go of either.

    Those R's are reknowned shooters. I've got one in 250 that sounds like it's from the same era. It only shoots a little over an inch with 100's, but put an 85-90-95 down the tube and it's likely to land right on top of the one that got there before it.

  3. #3
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Them .250's...

    It's my understanding that Savage never did get 'round to making the change from 1-12 or so to a faster twist so the little .250 would handle the heavier bullets. Most of the 'majors' still make .257 diameter bullets around 95 grains that do a nice job on deer/antelope sized animals. I'd personally love to have a .250 to fool around with, but it'll probably be one I have built up on one of the small ring 98's I've got kicking around here.
    I'll have to get some photos up of these two old timers...

  4. #4
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Darreld,
    Is this the model with the rotary magazine? One of my schoolteacher friends inherited a Savage 99 rifle from his grandfather a few years back and he told me it had a rotary magazine to feed the cartridges.

  5. #5
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Yes, it is

    a rotary magazine model. I don't think they started working the detachable box magazines in till the late 60's-early 70's. The spool was exclusively brass for many years, seems that toward the end of production, they were aluminum.
    The spool was a good idea for a lever gun, but not as practical as the box, except that you gain a bit of closure to the bottom of the action, and a measure of strength. Either allow the lever gun to use pointed bullets.
    The only drawback to the spool that I personally encountered was this one time when I left one loaded in the rack in the truck, and was checked by the fish cops at a check station. Saved my bacon with a CCW that permits me to have a loaded weapon, but otherwise would've been ticketed for having a loaded rifle in the truck.....

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darreld Walton View Post
    a rotary magazine model. I don't think they started working the detachable box magazines in till the late 60's-early 70's. The spool was exclusively brass for many years, seems that toward the end of production, they were aluminum.
    The spool was a good idea for a lever gun, but not as practical as the box, except that you gain a bit of closure to the bottom of the action, and a measure of strength. Either allow the lever gun to use pointed bullets.
    The only drawback to the spool that I personally encountered was this one time when I left one loaded in the rack in the truck, and was checked by the fish cops at a check station. Saved my bacon with a CCW that permits me to have a loaded weapon, but otherwise would've been ticketed for having a loaded rifle in the truck.....
    That era sounds about right. One of my 99's is a clip model in 284 Win, which was only made for a very short time.

    BTW- if you're capacity conscious, the nod goes in favor of the rotary because it holds more. My 284 only holds 3 rounds, while the rotaries hold 5 or 6, if memory serves correctly. And no, I'm not getting off my butt right now to go digging in the safes to confirm the number!!! ;-)

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