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Thread: What to do with chum salmon?

  1. #1
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    Default What to do with chum salmon?

    I've never kept any chums. Someone told me they were fine canned or smoked, but not so hot grilled or baked. Are they worth keeping for canning? I wouldn't mind putting up a case of pints if I thought they'd be decent.

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Can them...

    ... if they are bright. The British used to prefer chums canned to any other Alaska salmon ("keta"). They can be smoked as well. In fact, smoke for short period and then can. Very good.

    Chum roe is the BEST for curing for fishing for more sought after species (followed by pink)

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... if they are bright. The British used to prefer chums canned to any other Alaska salmon ("keta"). They can be smoked as well. In fact, smoke for short period and then can. Very good.

    Chum roe is the BEST for curing for fishing for more sought after species (followed by pink)
    I agree. And they make for an outstanding spread with mayo, onion, and dill pickles - like a tuna sandwich. But, so do every other kind of salmon

  4. #4
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Default

    A fresh Chum is great for smoking canning or grilling. They have a nice mild flavor.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  5. #5
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    The chums i have had were not very good. For me they will all go back. Kind of like Bass here in MN. Some people like them but man they just dont taste right. If i get a bass on accident i pitch it back.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    ... if they are bright. The British used to prefer chums canned to any other Alaska salmon ("keta"). They can be smoked as well. In fact, smoke for short period and then can. Very good.

    Chum roe is the BEST for curing for fishing for more sought after species (followed by pink)
    I used some of that hickory seasoning when I canned some pinks and it gave it a smoked flavor that was really good.

    Thanks for the advice, everyone. It will be nice if I can find a bright chum, since it seems I always catch them when they've got that brindle color going on. Out at sea they're as beautiful a fish as any other seabright salmon, but boy do they get ugly when they smell fresh water.

  7. #7
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    Default Chum Dawgs...

    The more colorful, the better the picture before the release. That is my favorite salmon to fight while knee deep in a river. This is the angry salmon if there ever was one. The greater the hooked jaw, the more ferocious they seem to become. Dawg Days; how I enjoyed them.

    The advice given on edibility was quite correct. When these fish are netted and commercialy sold, they are known as "Silver Brite". Alaska nets eleven million to the tune of over $30 million to an almost entire foreign market...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  8. #8
    Member akshrop's Avatar
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    I only serve them to my in-laws.

  9. #9
    Member John_Pennell's Avatar
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    Default Bake 'em and Flake 'em

    and use them to make salmon patties. My kids love them.
    "My rod and my reel, they comfort me."

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