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Thread: moving firearms to Anchorage

  1. #1
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    Default moving firearms to Anchorage

    Hello, Well I just took a job here n Anchorage, so we will be moving up in a month. We are still weighing and pricing options for the move, but I think either way we will be driving one car up. We are coming from Colorado.

    I was just wondering what the best way would be to get my rifles up here? I have about 4 rifles and 2 shotguns. I need to check with canadas laws, would it be easier to just have them shipped.

    In terms of reloading supplies, does anyone know what canada will let me go through with??

    Just thought I'd check here, I'll look elsewhere as well

    thanks

  2. #2
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    I've done the drive several times, with firearms, including this past April and June. The Canadians have lots of rules, you can find all the details at http://www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca/default_e.asp
    I've NEVER had a problem with the Canadians, except it is annoying to have to pay the $50 registration fee. The fee is for all your guns not each. That makes it cheaper to bring them yourself rather than ship them. Contrary to what many say, it isn't even difficult to bring handguns as long as they don't fall into the "Prohibited" category. It just takes an extra call to get the approval.
    One thing you have to watch is barrel length. If you have a youth model rifle it may be too short. I inadvertently had two of these on one trip and the Canadians mentioned it but let me through anyway. Surprisingly, the Canadians have only checked my guns when I told them I had a handgun. Otherwise, they've just done the paperwork and sent me on my way.
    Getting back into the US is where customs looks at things much closer. The last three times I crossed into the US they wanted to see every gun to check the serial numbers to make sure they weren't stolen (or so they said). It seems this is more common going south rather than when entering Alaska but you never know.
    I don't know about the reloading equipment. I'd guess the equipment will be fine but there may be limits on supplies, especially powder and primers. I'd call the Canadians and ask. They've always been very helpful and pleasant when I've dealt with them. Maybe post what you find out, I'd like to know.

  3. #3
    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    I've heard of people mailing guns to themselves.

  4. #4

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    I have seen, not heard, of one person in my vamily almost going to jail for mailing a cheapo handgun and they did lose the gun to confiscation.

    Postal Regs require FFL to use the mail to ship a handgun.

    One can us a common carrier legally to ship your firearms to yourself. However UPS, FEDEX etc seem to have thier own rules, depending on who you talk to at the company. I have shipped firams to myself via FEDEX with no problems, I alsways declared them as well. I have had FEDEX and UPS refuse to take them as well.

    I have traveled to Canad arecently with a shotgun. I found it better to have the form filled out and with you when you cross the border. You can download the Canadian form. US Customs can be picky as well. Yu might want to fill out the US form showingownership before you leave the US and have it stamped as well, to ease the return to the US.

    Hope that helps!


    At least they are not freaking out over pumpkin seeds in the ashtray like when I was a young college guy in the 70's...OTOH I have breezeed through customs many times in Uniform at the airport...

  5. #5

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    I moved up about three years ago and made the drive with all my rifles and reloading supplies. Rifles were not a problem just had to pay the fee and fill out the paperwork. Reloading supplies were a problem. I was turned around at the border for having too much ammo and was barely under the limit for powder. Luckily I had a friend that lived at the border and was able to off load some of my ammo. The Canadians told me to pick my 200 most favorite rounds. This was a shock because I called prior to making my trip and was told it wasn't going to be a problem. Make sure you have the rules on paper and write down who, where and when you talk to somebody. If they tell you something on the phone ask them to also tell you were you can get a copy so you have proof. It was a good night when I crossed back onto U.S. soil. Good Bless the troops for giving us what we have. Coming back in was a breeze. Looked at my trailer manifest, talked about my elk and deer racks and I was on my way. Didn't even look at my guns. Good luck with the move.

  6. #6
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    Thanks fellas,, I'll look into the link, I really did not want to ship them to a ffl, it would be shipping costs plus whatever the ffl charged.

    Sounds like what I need to find out is the ammo and reloading regulations,,,I dont mind parting with some powder, or getting rid of it in colorado but at over a buck for nosler brass, it will start to hurt, bullets as well.

    cant wait for the move!

  7. #7

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    I forgot to mention that they didn't say anything or inquire about primers, bullets, or brass just the loaded ammo. If I would've know I wouldn't have spent time reloading over the holidays just before I came up.

  8. #8
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    The best way to beat all of this, is to ship by barge. Canada had a limit of 1,000 rounds of ammo. Now if you tried to get a case of .22 LR ammo across, you had a problem. They do have a permit for shipping powder and primers, you have to apply in time (60 days prior) and pay a 60.00 fee. I had several 100 pounds of powder and a quarter million primers with the permit from Ottawa.

    It really is easier to mail your rifles to yourself. You do not have to go through an FFL to do so. Handguns are strictly forbidden by U.S. Postal regulations. I would sell them, or wait for a friend to come for a visit on the plane. Last time I went across, they wanted a 4473 ATF form filled out for each firearm you carried across into the U.S., I think the rules seem to change with whoever is on duty at the crossing point.

    To bad you didn't start your search for information sooner.

    Ammo, primers and powder is best shipped with SPAN ALASKA. If you go through Washington State you have to drive close to them anyway. Remember the limit per barge is 400 pounds and they do it on one pallet. It's the cheapest way to ship.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9

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    You don't have to ship them to an FFL. Most of the major airlines, like Alaska Airlines will allow you to ship them as air freight. Call and find out where the air freight terminal is for Alaska at DIA and ship them to Anchorage. Pick them up when you get there...

    http://alaskacargo.custhelp.com/cgi-...i=&p_topview=1

  10. #10
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    Search function at the top of the bar.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  11. #11
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    Thumbs up Remove parts before shipping

    I always take a key part out of the firearm before shipment. That way a thief in the system won't get a complete firearm. Ship that part or multiple parts at least a few days later. I have had ammo stolen from UPS, they did take care of my claim. I always take time to thank GOD and our Veterans for the freedoms we enjoy!

  12. #12

    Default AMHS as another option

    Also consider the Alaska Marine Highway System 'boats'. Firearms and loaded rounds legally possessed in the U.S. can be shipped by AMHS, as long as they are declared and stored in separate compartments of your vehicle - assuming you're traveling there on the boat with them. Ammo cannot exceed 65 lbs although enforcement may vary. Loose primers and powders (black or smokeless) are strictly prohibited. They may require you to store the firearms/ammunition in the vessel security storage units.

    See the bottom of the page at: http://www.dot.state.ak.us/amhs/TravelOptions/Details/index.html for more information and contact AMHS directly. Regardless of what's in print or what you're told, always contact specific port personnel prior to departure date.

    I've heard of widely varying experiences when dealing with Canadian authorities on firearms and related items. I own too many firearms that are blatantly illegal in Canada to even consider transport through there, but I'm considering a move to AK when I get out of the military next spring and wasn't aware of the barge system to ship powder and primers. Thanks for that info.

  13. #13

    Default Moving firearms to Anchorage

    Howdy, I work for AMHS and can say you should not have a problem with your guns. As far as loaded ammo, primers and powder I have not seen any regulations as to a limit. The problem you are going to have is that the Bellingham ferry goes as far as Haines/Skagway then you have the Canadian problem again. There is a Cross gulf sailing that goes Juneau-Whittier which is back in the USA and only 45 minutes from Anchorage but the next sailing for that with space is November 4th and unfortunately it's not cheap.

  14. #14
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    Default Moving with gun

    I just did my last load from CO in June and came across where you will be going. I carried over 25 in the safe and sent the ones that you can't carry at all( pistol and assault type ) by mail. I roled into the gate with a list of what i had sn#, barrel length, cal, type, an est of rounds and mags. They kept asking about pistols and i showed the mailing insurance slip and they were good with that. I filled out the paper work and paid 35$ for all and after that they did not even look at the guns.
    You do need to declair on the US side before you go to the Canandan side. That way you will not have any problem on the other end. They did not even ask about reloading stuff. If you have your ducks in a row when you come to the gate they will not hassle you over this. Plus they will ask you what you are doing and where you are going. No worries, go luck.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
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  15. #15
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    Just an update, we are driving up sept 22, I downloaded the forms and will have them pre-filled out, called the border and they told me 1000 rounds of ammo, no biggie.

    I figured for just 7 rifles and shotguns it would be easier to just take them along, and cheaper as well.

    Thanks again

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