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Thread: Guide Gun

  1. #1

    Default Guide Gun

    Really like the Guide Gun (ss); out of the 45-70, .444. or .450 cartridges (or others) available for that gun, which is the most suitable for cost, bear protection, and possible (but not likely) moose hunting? I guess what I'm asking is this: is one cartridge able to best provide the 3 criteria? Not familia of the delivered velocity/energy of these.
    Thanks,
    Jim

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Really like the Guide Gun (ss); out of the 45-70, .444. or .450 cartridges (or others) available for that gun, which is the most suitable for cost, bear protection, and possible (but not likely) moose hunting? I guess what I'm asking is this: is one cartridge able to best provide the 3 criteria? Not familia of the delivered velocity/energy of these.
    Thanks,
    Jim
    The 45/70 will meet the your criteria the best.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default yep..

    45/70 would be my bet. I have that same gun. Great gun. Consider XS Sight Systems ghost ring sight. Particularly for bear protection. Works like a charm. Very fast aiming with that sight. Of the two rear rings, I like the larger of the two that come in the pack. I sent mine to www.stevesgunz.com in Texas. He did one heck of an action job on it for about a hundred bucks. Like a whole different gun. Smooth as butter. I sanded mine down and used spray on truck bed liner (black). Took about 5 light coats to do it right. Very slick. Been on for three years. I use mine on float trips in NW Alaska. Camping on gravel river bars and hauling around in canoes. Not a scratch yet. Works great. If interested, shoot me a pm and I will give you the details. Cost about $15. I also like the slimmed down forearm. Just feels better to me. I got the idea off the marlin forum below. Lots of good info on that forum. Check out the big bore and 45/70 forums. Post the same question here on those forums. Lots of activity.

    http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php

    http://www.xssights.com/store/rifle.html

    http://www.brockmansrifles.com/lever_cust.asp

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=11639
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
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    Default

    The 45/70 is definately the way to go. The spray on bedliner is a great tip, I did mine like that several years ago and it really held up well. THe over size lever loops and scout mount with 2.5x leupold are also really good aditions to the guide gun setup. I like the wild west ghost rings really well too. Here is what mine looked like before I got rid of it in a fit of stupidity.


  5. #5

    Default Thanks guys...

    If I ever do pull the trigger (pun intended) on a 45-70, what's the best over the counter brand & weight of ammo to buy for bear protection?
    Thanks,
    Jim

  6. #6
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    Default

    The garret, and buffalo bore ammo are pretty good. The grizzly brand is supposed to be pretty good too, but you really owe it to yourself to reload for that bad boy. The 45/70 is super easy to load for and you can really crank it up.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thebear_78 View Post
    The 45/70 is definately the way to go. The spray on bedliner is a great tip, I did mine like that several years ago and it really held up well. THe over size lever loops and scout mount with 2.5x leupold are also really good aditions to the guide gun setup. I like the wild west ghost rings really well too. Here is what mine looked like before I got rid of it in a fit of stupidity.


    I have to agree.. I bought this gun... great deal and thanks again . I love it. The only thing I don't like about the bed liner stuff is that it comes off on your hands if you have bug spray on them.... It kinda has a camo look to it now because of the original stock color showing through in patches.....

  8. #8
    Member AKPacker's Avatar
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    Default

    The .45-70 and .450 Marlin have identical ballistics when loaded to full potential (as done by Buffalo Bore, Garrett, Grizzly, etc.), with .45-70 having a huge advantage in availability since its been around for well over 100 years. The .444 is a good round, but can't push the heavier 400-500+ grain bullets that the .45's can. The .45-70 is a very versatile round, you can push mild 300 grain bullets for plinking or deer hunting, all the way up to heavy loaded 550 grain bullets for grizzly defense.

    Here's my .45-70 Guide Gun thats been slicked up by Wild West Guns in Anchorage:
    Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.

  9. #9

    Default

    Load your own!
    I let my brother take a couple of shots from the 1895 and I recovered the bullets. Shooting into a 8" Diameter Birch and the bullet travelled 10-12" into a bank of fine sand; expansion was 1.1-1.18" and weighed 390gr each. These were 400gr Hornady's, ball powder and 350 primer with a 22" barrel. Manfacturers have to account for those that have trap doors and load them accordingly.

  10. #10

    Default One more question...

    an amateur one to boot; I'm a left handed shooter; will the ejecting cartridge case smack me in the face firing these guns?
    Thanks,
    Jim

  11. #11

    Default

    I've got one, and I shoot left-handed, too. No problem. For bears, I'd either load up some Beartooth hardcast or some Kodiaks or some Woodleighs and have at it. If I was buying OTC ammo for bears, I'd prolly go with Garrett Hammerheads. Those freakin' hardcast bullets will penetrate and penetrate and penetrate some more!!! Those bad boys just keep on going!! The advantage to the .45-70 chambering is better ammo availability, and a better variety of loads, from light cowboy and 300 gr loads, to medium power loads, to T-Rex loads (either store-bought or handloaded). It's an extremely versatile cartridge. The 450 Marlin was an answer to a problem that never existed. Mine is a regular 1895G. However, I do see an 1895GS in my future, as well, for hunting in bad weather. I also have a 444 Outfitter that I'm really fond of.

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