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Thread: Cleaning Dies??

  1. #1

    Default Cleaning Dies??

    Hello, well I finally got the bench built, the PRO2000 set up (thanks wife) and even got a LEE "O" press yesterday to do single stage stuff. Any back to the question; I have purchased two sets of carbide dies and they need to be cleaned. Is your standard NAPA break cleaner good for this or should I use gun cleaner or????

    ALSO, what is a good die order set up?? Somewhere I thought I saw several different ways to station the dies. FYI I do have a low/high powder die...

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabear99687 View Post
    Hello, well I finally got the bench built, the PRO2000 set up (thanks wife) and even got a LEE "O" press yesterday to do single stage stuff. Any back to the question; I have purchased two sets of carbide dies and they need to be cleaned. Is your standard NAPA break cleaner good for this or should I use gun cleaner or????

    ALSO, what is a good die order set up?? Somewhere I thought I saw several different ways to station the dies. FYI I do have a low/high powder die...
    I would not use brake cleaner because it will diminish yor ability to think and that may be needed. Also that doesn't mix well with powder and/or hot light bulbs.

    I use acetone to degrease new dies and just bore solvent (Hoppe's, Butches, etc) to clean dies before each use. I put a cleaning patch soaked in solvent on the decapper rod and run it into the die them dry it well. This will get the grit and old lube out. What helps dies most is to clean the brass well before running them into the die.

    I have a seven station turret and I arrange dies in it in order of use, size expand, seat, crimp. I also mark the station so the dies will go to the same hole each time. The minor difference in the thickness of the turret head at each position would require readjusting the dies if I didn't put them back into the same hole.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
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    Brake cleaner should actually work fine--but it would be best to make sure it's a non-chlorinated type for health reasons. I use non-chlorinated brake cleaner all the time on my bullet moulds. It evaporates quickly and doesn't leave any residue.

    I don't clean my dies every time I use them, but a lot of my seating/crimping dies require a somewhat frequent cleaning because I mainly shoot cast bullets, at least in the pistol calibers. The last couple of cleanings I just used WD-40 and it worked fine. You could probably also use just about any solvent you'd normally use to clean your guns.

    Mike

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