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Thread: Tow vehicle and saltwater corrosion

  1. #1

    Default Tow vehicle and saltwater corrosion

    This is the first year I have been launching a boat in saltwater. I've noticed that my fishing tackle and everything that gets salt on it seems to corrode very quickly. I'm concerned about my tow vehicle. Should I expect the back 1/4 of it to basically fall apart in a few years?? I haven't noticed anything major yet, but wonder if there is something I should be doing to limit the corrosion. I wash down the boat after pulling it out of the sea, should I do the same for the truck? Just got to thinking about this last weekend. Any ideas?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Iíve never actually had to submerge any part of my tow vehicle while launching or retrieving my boat. If youíre actually submerging part of tow vehicle at the ramp then most likely it will turn brown and fall off.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  3. #3

    Default

    My hitch and all go in the drink, parts that are not painted are a nice brown color that matches the wilderness very nicely. Hose it down if you can and drive home when its really rainning that way the water will rinse off the under side, it should be rainning constantly so no worries.

  4. #4

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    "drive home when its really rainning that way the water will rinse off the under side, it should be rainning constantly so no worries."
    You sure got that right! Leave the fishing rods on the deck, so they get a good soak/rinse too.
    I was taught not to let the back tires hit the salt water.
    I am amazed when I see guys with thier exhaust pipes bubbling in the water and/or their hubs under water as they launch or retrieve.

  5. #5
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default If really worried

    Try Saltaway. I use it and it seems to work. Just need to reapply every now and then. Here is the link


    http://www.saltawayproducts.com/


    My boat and trailer are on their 5th season with very little rust and original brakes/backing plates with little to no corrision.

  6. #6

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    Another vote for salt away. Good stuff.

  7. #7

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    I carry a bug sprayer loaded up with SaltAway and give the trailer brakes a good spray after each dunking. You can use the stuff on fishing tackle as well. I'm able to launch without any of the truck getting wet, but I guess that depends on trailer tongue length and a bunch of other factors as well.

  8. #8

    Default All I can say is.....

    Do remember to set the parking brake, or you are going to be lucky that only a 1/4th falls off.......

  9. #9

    Default Wow...

    I think our salinity content here (Kauai) is more than in Alaska; it's not optional to rinse your truck off if the tires touch the saltwater; it's a MUST. No kidding. Lot's of guys here have sliding trailer tongue extensions welded to the trailer (you block the trailer tires, then pull the truck ahead slowly, extending the tongue extension until it hits a welded "stop"; the extension is greased pretty well); pretty slick how it works and gives you another 4-6 feet or so of length when launching. I'll try to take some pics. No matter what, really, really rinse the truck off under the bed, wheelwells, axle, etc. Brakes and everything will dry off quickly once on the road. Most guys here have to rebuild/patch/strip their galvanized trailers here every year or so, depending on use and if you're good about rinsing the trailer off after the INITIAL launch, not waiting all day so the saltwater can crusty up your trailer. Messiest thing I ever did was strip & help re-build the charter boat's trailer that I worked on; we had to strip that trailer down to nuts & bolts and rails, dismantling axles, springs, hubs everything. Upon re-assembly we got 5 gal buckets of grease and smeared it everywhere possible; this was a honkin trailer too; for a 34' boat, triple axle. Fun. That trailer was galvanized too.
    Jim

  10. #10
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    I think our salinity content here (Kauai) is more than in Alaska; it's not optional to rinse your truck off if the tires touch the saltwater; it's a MUST. No kidding. Lot's of guys here have sliding trailer tongue extensions welded to the trailer (you block the trailer tires, then pull the truck ahead slowly, extending the tongue extension until it hits a welded "stop"; the extension is greased pretty well); pretty slick how it works and gives you another 4-6 feet or so of length when launching. I'll try to take some pics. No matter what, really, really rinse the truck off under the bed, wheelwells, axle, etc. Brakes and everything will dry off quickly once on the road. Most guys here have to rebuild/patch/strip their galvanized trailers here every year or so, depending on use and if you're good about rinsing the trailer off after the INITIAL launch, not waiting all day so the saltwater can crusty up your trailer. Messiest thing I ever did was strip & help re-build the charter boat's trailer that I worked on; we had to strip that trailer down to nuts & bolts and rails, dismantling axles, springs, hubs everything. Upon re-assembly we got 5 gal buckets of grease and smeared it everywhere possible; this was a honkin trailer too; for a 34' boat, triple axle. Fun. That trailer was galvanized too.
    Jim

    I noticed all the rust on tow vehicles and trailers on all the Hawaiian islands, too. I think that the higher temperatures and increased humidity contribute to the corrosion issues.

    I like the idea of the pump sprayer filled with salt away. DMan and I have been talking about doing this. Sounds like it may be a good idea.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  11. #11

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    I've also heard of someone whose floorboard in their truck rusted out because they brought lots of saltwater into the truck when they got in after launching/retrieving their boat while wearing their hip waders. Probably happened over a period of time.

  12. #12
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    Don't let anythign that is metal on your tow vehicle get submerged. I have to dip a tire to retrieve my hewes, but I don't let water touch my rim or brakes.

    Saw a couple guys in seward that were over their rear hub - one guy was over the rear tire (!). He had slipped off the end of one of the center ramps at the north launch at low tide. burble burble...

    I was cringing.

  13. #13

    Smile

    I dip my rear tires but not the rim, my hitch is really long because of my 10ft camper. It might be worth the extra money and length to get a hitch extension like mine, even if you don't have a camper, just to avoid the water. ...But really, its rainning all the time so why are we even discussing this?

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