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Thread: Did I screw up?

  1. #1
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Default Did I screw up?

    As I was putting this foundation in, and framing my cabin, it made perfect sense what I was doing, and there was logic to it. I was by myself, and decided against trying to hand dig below the frostline, so I figured rather than fighting it, I'd work around it... the pier blocks are adjustable, so if it heaved or settled, I'd just adjust the blocks, and add paver blocks as necessary. Now, stepping back and looking at it, I'm not getting a warm fuzzy. I'm worried about the big side frontal area, and wind (it's not anchored down, just sitting on the blocks). It's made it through a full season, and settling or heaving hasn't been an issue at all. The ground is lots of gravel, with about 4-6 inches of clay on top (I dug down to the gravel). I'm wondering if I should just call it good, dig in anchors (concrete / steel cables) or, just start working around the outside and putting in proper footers. The skirting is just screwed on, and can be removed.

    What are your thoughts?




  2. #2

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    I built mine on pier blocks. But we also had an 8" gravel pad put in first. Below that it's solid rock. Most of Ketchikan is that way. I probably wouldn't worry about it too much. As long as you can get under it to jack stuff up you'll be okay. But then again lots of buildings and cabin here have a tilt that's never fixed.




  3. #3

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    If you are worried about settlement, I'd say at this point it is easier to adjust things if you have to then go around digging 5' holes under your cabin. If you have gravelly soil that the pier blocks are resting on you are probably fine.

    As far a blowing over, it is going to depend on what kind of wind your cabin might be subjected to. Our cabin is on pier blocks too. It sits in the woods, in low rolling hills, in an area that is not know for real high gusts. I'm not worried about it blowing over. If you are sitting on an exposed bluff, you might think about some anchors.

    Now what I didn't think about, was if the snow on one half of the roof slid while the other half doesn't. Last winter at about 6am it felt like that happened and that the cabin started going over before the second side let go. Woke me and the wife up and I can't say for certain that's what happened but it sure felt like it!

  4. #4
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    I would,nt worry to much Last one I built just put on railroad ties flat on the ground, Wind just anchor like mentioned before, However I would say something about that door on the side. Everything from that roof, rain ,snow, is going to end up in front of it, It will be a pain, I would bring it in from the end, And build your deck there and bring the roof line out over it and end of problem, Going to get there have to shovel 4 ft, snow to get in,

  5. #5
    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SusitnaAk View Post
    I would,nt worry to much Last one I built just put on railroad ties flat on the ground, Wind just anchor like mentioned before, However I would say something about that door on the side. Everything from that roof, rain ,snow, is going to end up in front of it, It will be a pain, I would bring it in from the end, And build your deck there and bring the roof line out over it and end of problem, Going to get there have to shovel 4 ft, snow to get in,
    Thanks, already have that figured out though. Off to the left, out of picture is all the lumber for the covered porch. The roof for it will be perpendicular to the main roof. Later, I'll probably close it in for a mud room. Off the front of the cabin, there's not much ground there, it slopes off pretty quickly, and that's where my driveway comes up... have to leave the little land there is for sleds and wheelers to get around. Eventually, when I can get a dozer in there, I'll make more room.

  6. #6
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    Default Pier block foundations

    Banks finance them! What could go wrong? If you are worried, slide 8 ft. railroad ties perpendicular to the long side and block it up to meet the height of the support beams. It will take some of the pressure off the piers as it settles, and stabilize it some too. That's the easy way...

    One other thing...I would definately get under there and cross-brace your foundation if you haven't already. You will notice it gets significantly stiffer when you do that.

  7. #7

    Default Frost Line

    I have been in the excavating buisness for a number of years and would not take the chances of spending all that money to build a cabin and not protecting the base. I just put in sauna tubes for my deck last week. I used the cone shaped forms that are 18' tall and 4' tubes wrapped with three layers of heavy plastic. The plactic acts as a slip joint and does not allow the frost to get a grip on the tubes. The price on the deck will be about 12,000 so the 1,200 or so I spent on the souna tubes and protecting the base is well worth the time and money.

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