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Thread: Halibut fishing question

  1. #1

    Default Halibut fishing question

    From all that I have read about boating, it has been advised that for a good anchor you lay out 7 feet of anchor rode (rope) for every foot of depth to the bottom.

    My question is that if you are fishing for halibut in say 150 feet of water that would mean 1050 feet of rode! That's a heck of a lot of rope! And that doesn't take into consideration the height of your boat above water!

    Does everyone carry that much rope for flatfish or do you do things differently?

  2. #2
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    Default It depends on the weather and tides

    three times the depth is plaenty if the wind and tides are not bad.


    Does that help you???
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by FbksFishinFool View Post
    From all that I have read about boating, it has been advised that for a good anchor you lay out 7 feet of anchor rode (rope) for every foot of depth to the bottom.

    My question is that if you are fishing for halibut in say 150 feet of water that would mean 1050 feet of rode! That's a heck of a lot of rope! And that doesn't take into consideration the height of your boat above water!

    Does everyone carry that much rope for flatfish or do you do things differently?

    The 7 to 1 ratio will hold you in just about all conditions known to mankind. I have 400 feet or so and I fish 250 just fine most of the time. If the tide is ripping, the wind is whippin, and they are not canceling each other out to some degree, than you probably need to fish for something else. However, I will confess, that my setup has held in some pretty surprising conditions.

  4. #4

    Default Lots of factors

    One big factor is the length and weight of the chain attached to the anchor. It should be about the length of your boat.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Default Oversize Anchor - Lots of Chain

    I routinely anchor in 50 fathoms (300 feet) in wind and tide and when I set out I make sure I keep the anchor and chain suspended for just long enough to make sure I don't get a tangle and a poor hook-up. I have a 24' Bayliner Trophy and use an 18-lb Danforth and 35 feet of 3/8-inch chain. Its a rare situation if I drag-out. You have to use some common sense and a little "windage" to land where you want, but depending on conditions - I have out about 70 fathoms of rope in 50 fathoms. of water. Good luck.

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    I just let it hit bottom and then pay out about 25-40 feet of line, usually does the trick.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by JKD View Post
    I routinely anchor in 50 fathoms (300 feet) in wind and tide and when I set out I make sure I keep the anchor and chain suspended for just long enough to make sure I don't get a tangle and a poor hook-up. I have a 24' Bayliner Trophy and use an 18-lb Danforth and 35 feet of 3/8-inch chain. Its a rare situation if I drag-out. You have to use some common sense and a little "windage" to land where you want, but depending on conditions - I have out about 70 fathoms of rope in 50 fathoms. of water. Good luck.
    I have just about the same setup for my C-Dory. It works great, don't it

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pike_palace View Post
    I just let it hit bottom and then pay out about 25-40 feet of line, usually does the trick.
    Same here... Or I let enough out until I'm over my mark
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  9. #9

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    The 7:1 scope is a general rule of thumb and would be more applicable if you were anchored for the night and wanted to get a good night's sleep. Even then, 7:1 is probably more than you need. If you're going to be awake and keeping watch (i.e. fishing), then much less than 7:1 is usually adequate. The deepest I've anchored in overnight is a little over 200 feet and I let out all of my 630 feet of rode (600 line, 30 chain).

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The other option is, don't anchor up, drift. I seldom anchor up in deeper water as I'm spending more time dinking around setting and pulling the anchor then fishing.

    And as others have said, when fishing you don't need a 7:1 scope, you can get away with much less as if the anchor pulls it isn't that big of a deal.

    Also some people use a "fishing" anchor which is an inexspensive anchor they don't care if they loose, and they run up to 1000' of lesser line that they won't cry if it breaks.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Hope Iím never in a situation where 7:1 scope is needed.
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  12. #12

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    whatever you do dont anchor from the stern............always from the bow

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    I am new to this anchoring up for the night thing, but I am kinda relying on my anchor alarm option on my chart plotter. That and I never anchor up in over 100'ft of water with my 210'ft of rope. I feel pretty safe, am I? I am always secluded in a cove somewhere.

  14. #14

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    Jesus guys. You all wrong it's not 7:1 if you want a good stick on your anchor, it's 1:7. Tie this to 10 ft of chain and 100 ft of rope and you'll be good in anything less than 20 ft long.
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  15. #15

    Smile More is better.......

    Things to consider. For the most part the chain used on most personal fishing boats is not long enough or heavy enough to lay on the bottom because of the scope of the anchor line. It does help with the wear and tear on the line because the chain is between it and the bottom. A 7 to 1 scope is a recomendation of the U.S. Navy and not needed for recreational fishing. A good 3 strand nylon line like New England rope gives about a 25% stretch which helps a lot when anchored. Double braided nylon only has about a 15% stretch. If your pulling anchor with a buoy it is easier and safer if you have a lot of scope to work with. It makes it easier to keep the line away from your props. I have a windless on the bow of my 26' boat and I carry 600 ft of 1/2 inch 3 strand nylon, the chain is 25' long. I don't anchor in over 250' of water when fishing. I also carry a buoy, another 300' of line and a extra anchor.

  16. #16
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Also when you pull your anchor do you use the buoy method or do you just go by hand and/or anchor winch?
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  17. #17

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    Thanks everyone for your replies...sounds like I am overcomplicating this anchor thing (as usual) but I am just going by what I've read - not saying it's accurate!
    I don't have a boat as yet but I'm looking and when I find my baby, I will get the proper anchor and a boat's length's chain. Then I'll determine the max depth I care to anchor in and get an adequate line for that. Thanks.

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    My personal recomendation would be to have a chain that is rougly as long as your boat, my boat is 23', chain 27', and 600 feet of line for the rode. That will cover most fishing, overnight and emergency anchoring needs. Also recomended is a secondary anchor in the event your primary anchor get's hungup or otherwise lost. I like a bruce style anchor as a primary, and anchor the chain at the head of the anchor and use twine to tie it to the arm so that if it gets hungup the twine breaks and the anchor pulls free. When you anchor the twine merely keeps the chain in the same position as the anchor and sees very little force. It's only if the anchor get's stuck and you are pulling it that the twine would break.

    There are a host of factors that go into how and where you anchor. Prevailing wind, bottom type, swinging room, etc etc. While 1:7 may be ideal, say you're in nominally 20' of water, and you thus have a 140' tether you are swinging from. You could easily find that at low tide you end up swinging onto the rocks. In that case, a shorter scope would be better than a longer scope, or a small anchor of the transom or a line to shore to limit your swing.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by chauvotsm View Post
    Jesus guys. You all wrong it's not 7:1 if you want a good stick on your anchor, it's 1:7. Tie this to 10 ft of chain and 100 ft of rope and you'll be good in anything less than 20 ft long.
    1:7? One foot of rode for every seven feet of water?
    What if you're anchoring in 100 feet of water at low tide with 110 feet of rode (about 1:1 scope), the tide raises 15 feet during the night and the wind starts to blow? Fine if you're fishing during the day and awake if you start to drag anchor.

    7:1 is a lot of scope and I don't think I've ever used that much. You'd swing an awful lot. If it's tight where I'm anchoring for the night, I'll let out extra to get a good anchor set and then pull in some line so I swing less.

    And get the largest anchor your boat (or you) can handle. I don't sleep worse because I have a large anchor out at night. Then go the extra step (if space allows) to have an extra anchor and line in case yours get stuck and you have to cut loose. A buddy and I were at Naked Island for the night before heading to Montague. Only a 16-lb Bruce anchor. The two of us couldn't get it unstuck in the morning and were going to have to cut the line. No anchor would mean cutting the weekend short. Tied off the line and almost buried the bow pulling but finally got it loose. He'd sold his two spare anchors a week before at a garage sale.

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