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Thread: De-sliming fish?

  1. #1

    Default De-sliming fish?

    After many bags of processed/packed fish; I can't believe I've never asked this question before: Does anyone have any ideas how to de-slime fish before freezing?
    We usually leave the skin on the fillets in case we barbecue later; if pan frying or searing, I skin them later.
    I just scrub the crap out of the fillet pieces under fresh water, paper towel dry, then pack.
    Thanks,
    Jim

  2. #2

    Default

    Get rid of the skin. I don't keep the skin on anymore because of the slime. If you want the skin on, you'll just have the deal with the slime.

  3. #3
    Member yogibear's Avatar
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    Default My way...

    ...is just that. I never worry about slime. I rinse the filets, no scrubbing, then lay them out on news paper, skin down, to absorb moisture. Pat the flesh dry with paper towels, then vacuum pack. The rinse is more to get any river dirt that may have hitched a ride to the house.

    No one's died yet and my four kids aged 3 to 15 always eat it, so the flavor is good.

    Some slimeaphobes may think it's nasty, but like I said, it's my way. It's simple and it works.

  4. #4
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    Default

    It ain't hard to get the slime off of a Salmon.

    I wash them in water with vinegar, and scrape it off, with a knife, along with the scales.

    Lord Willing, I'll be canning some Silvers when I get back from my first hunting trip. I will take ALL the slime off, and also the scales. The fish will be as dry to the touch as a steak, when I cut them up for canning.

    I think it's best to can fish with the skins on, (after scaling and de-slimeing) because there is fat under the skin, especially the belly parts. I cut them into strips, then to length, and make sure there's a belly piece or two in each jar.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
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  5. #5
    Member BigBrown767's Avatar
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    Default sliming

    I take my fillets and lay them on a clean surface meat side down out in the yard and then take the garden hose on high pressure and blast the skin side. It's fast and works like a champ!

  6. #6
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Salt

    We started using salt after watching 2 guys cleaning dipnetted sockeyes a few years back. By Spring, we noticed our filets seemed to stay bright colored and not develop that little "off' flavor that frozen filets used to.

    Good friends who had a fish wheel on the Copper for years used vinegar and scrub brush, which did seem to work, but we like the salt-and just rub the salt with out hands to get the slime off, then rinse. Our experience with it has been good.

  7. #7

    Default Vinegar Soak

    We add a bit of vinegar to the water in the cooler along with the fish (of course). Let them sit for 30 minutes to an hour and the slime rolls off. Amount of vinegar depends on amount of fish and water.

  8. #8
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    Default

    6XLeech:
    Never heered about using salt, but I'll be tryin it.
    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  9. #9
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default

    I scale reds (often) with a curry comb (horse brush). I do this at the river before filleting, it works well to take off most of the scales and most of the slime. When processing (vaccum packing) fish in my RV I rinse them again prior to packaging, the lack of slime (from the curry comb method) makes fish much easier to package and rinse, and it conserves loads of water when you are in an RV not hooked up to water/sewer.

    For Silvers I like to scale with a high pressure water hose.
    Last edited by AKFishOn; 08-11-2008 at 07:48. Reason: Spelling Grammar

  10. #10
    Member AK Tubes's Avatar
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    Default Skin off

    I always skin before packaging. A little olive oil and a clean grill will keep it from sticking on the BBQ
    ...been on a search to top my 30x18 rainbow for 13 years now...I guess it's game time!!!
    13' Aire WildCat, 9' 7wt SAGE RPLXI, 10' 5wt SAGE XP, .300 RUM Zeiss 3x9 when all else fails

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    Default scaling...

    I second the curry comb method.

    You can also get a piece of wood about a foot and half long, and a couple inches thick, and drill four or five bottle caps one side - it does the scaling job well too.

    We started doing this a few years ago. It makes a huge difference when you start pulling fillets out at home. The fish seems to maintain it's "freshness" longer in the freezer too.

  12. #12
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Default

    Hmmm... I never thought of salmon as "slimy"... now halibut... that's a different story!

    Whenever I get a big flat fish, I lay out a layer of paper towels on my work surface, flop the fish down, then use more clean dry paper towels to wipe the slime off the top side that I'm about to work on. As long as you keep the fish and skin dry, they don't make more slime. I skin the fillets, but I suppose leaving the skin on to vac pac would be okay too. No slime as long as the meat and skin stay dry. Note that you can't work in the rain and expect this to work. Also, if you forgot to bleed the fish out well, when you begin cutting the blood will be a source of moisture and will cause more slime to be "created"...

    Weird stuff!

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  13. #13
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    Default

    Lay the salmon out, tails facing you, and wash them with a pressure washer starting at the tail and heading towards the head. Removes both the scales and the slime very easily.

  14. #14
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    Default scrub em.

    try scrubbing the entire fish before making any cuts with one of those plastic pot and pan scrubbers, the ones that look like tangled colored balls. Scale fish first, then scrub. The slime comes off easily. Another method that works is to scrape the fish with a serrated knife after removing the scales.

    That said, I'm trying the vinegar method!

  15. #15

    Default

    I never leave skin on a fish BUT I understand salmon is a different fish than what I'm use to.
    What I do know is that I never rinse the skin off fillets before freezing. Something about the fresh water makes the fillets begin to deteriorate. Of course they should be rinsed after thawing just prior to cooking.

  16. #16

    Default White,

    I think it depends on fish species. I live on Kauai, and it's a BIG no-no to rinse tuna (yellowfin, albacore, skipjack) fillets with fresh water; the meat very quickly turns a whitish color and goes mushy. White meat fish here like mahi, ono, etc. doesn't seem to do the same thing (kinda like halibut), but we don't go overboard on those with fresh water either.
    Now when we're fishing on the Kenai, I fillet/rinse the reds in the river water as I clean them, toss into ziplocs, then rinse again at home just prior to final vac packing, doesn't seem to affect the meat, but we pat fillets dry prior to vac packing.
    Jim

  17. #17

    Default

    I scrub the skin with a wire brush works good

  18. #18

    Default Vinegar

    I put a about a half cup of vienegar in one cooler with around 5 to 10 gallons water
    2nd cooler has plain water rinse works great. Hose fish off before processing.

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