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Thread: Knives of Alaska?

  1. #1
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    Default Knives of Alaska?

    Anyone have any experience with these knives? I'd think they would be pretty outstanding knives to use for skinning, etc, especially for how much they cost.

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    Matt, I picked up a skinner (cub bear) for my wife. I'm not to impressed. my gerber felt better and IMO lasts longer. I used it on a blackie this spring and I'll stick with my gerber. Alaska knives are nice but not worth the money IMO.

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    I have 7 of their knives and really like each and every one of them. I used the Hunter version to do 5 Caribou and that included splitting the rib cage and it never needed sharpening.

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    Default Jaeger

    I have the jaeger and I love it as I use it for everything, big game to small game and fur handling. Holds a good sharp edge and fits in the hand nicely, I plan on getting the camp knife model soon.

  5. #5

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    The only one I have is the Magnum Ulu in D-2. That is one fast skinning tool!
    Dan

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    Cost is not always a reliable indication an knife is worth a darn. Russ Knight, owner of Knight's Taxidermy, uses and sells a little white handled knife for $5. and is a great little fleshing knife, and great for taking rib meat off the bone. Knives of Alaska, not made in Alaska, are ok. I have the set but use my Buck for most things and have done two caribou completely before having to touch up the edge. Basically, everyone experiments and uses what they have discovered works best for them. I have seen people using the Ulus for skinning and fleshing and I wish I had their skill.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Anyone have any experience with these knives? I'd think they would be pretty outstanding knives to use for skinning, etc, especially for how much they cost.

    I have a set of them, and they are fine once you find the correct sharpening angle. However, the steel is not the hardest I can think of, and I would imagine one would have to have a steel nearby to touch the edge every now and then. The set I have has the skinner with a gut-hook, and a small paring knife, plus a stone to sharpen them. I keep them with me, but I haven't used them on moose so far. For skinning I use a $14.00 "skinner" that has a 4" blade, and made by Victorinox. This skinner does not come with a sheath, so I wrap it on soft leather and put it in the pack with the game bags. It's made of surgical steel, and the razor-sharp edge lasts long enough to skin two moose.

    I also have a very fine knife made by Gerber, and this one too has a very tough and thin blade that is hard to sharpen. But once you find the right sharpening angle you can shave with it. Best of all, this gift from my wife only cost $70.00 back in the early '80's. It has a soft rubber hand "grip" for your fingers, and the blade is made of surgical steel.

  8. #8
    Moderator JDM's Avatar
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    Default knives...

    I also have the set with the skinner with gut hook (I still havent found anything to use the gut hook for...) and the cub with sharpening stone, and used the set for several years...the cub is a good knife for caping and making cuts for skinning and has held an edge fairly well. The skinner is ok, not my favorite and kind of heavy as well.
    I currently use the $5 Victorinox commercial fishing knife, straight edge not serrated, and have found it to be good for everything fro moose, brownbear down to small trout sized fish. It is incredibly light, stays sharp/easy to touch up, blade is somewhat flexible, good for caping and doing the claws/paws on bear and other predators...I cannot say enough good things about the knives! One of the best things is that if I loose it, I'm only out $5!
    Sheaths are available as well...I generally carry 2 of these knives in my pack.
    My biggest problem with them is that my wife steals them for the kitchen!

  9. #9

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    JMD,
    Commercial fishing knife?????? Where, What? I looked around and didn't find any reference to such a thing. Boning knives aplenty, that look like fillet knives though.

    Dan

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Sounds like the victronox paring knife



    You can get them at most cutlerly supply houses, or commecial fishing shops. Try BJ commercial in Anchorage, if you don't see them on the knife isle ask for them, the Gear Shed in Homer, and a few other places have carried them. I keep a couple in the kitchen, in the truck, in the pack, in the boat. A couple passes on occasion over a ceramic sharpener and it's the knife that sees the most use.

  11. #11
    Member Alaskantrapper's Avatar
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    Alaska butcher supply has them as well.....

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    Why don't they call themselves "Knives of Texas" and stop trying to steal our name.

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