Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Ruger 77MKII laminated stock cracked, why?

  1. #1
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    648

    Question Ruger 77MKII laminated stock cracked, why?

    Yesterday I brought my Ruger 77MKII stainless/laminated stock .338 back from a pretty disappointing day at the range. I was working up a new load and some new loading procedures and my groups were getting worse all the time. I have had the rifle for 5 years and it was always been a good shooter. I recalled the post by Jake on filling out the angle screw hole in the stock and was going to give that a try after cleaning the rifle. I left it sitting on my cleaning bench with some cleaner soaking in it and two hours later when I came back I found that the stock had cracked right behind the tang. The cracks had developed while it was just sitting there. Now Iím trying to figure out what caused this to happen. I just had a trigger job done on the rifle. Is it possible the gunsmith incorrectly torqued down the receiver? I figured that the smith had probably done this a lot more times with better equipment that I had. I have heard of the straight wood stocks cracking, but figured laminated stocks would not be affected. The cracks run at a 45% angle to the laminate layers so I donít think the solvent eating at the epoxy was the problem. Can this be fixed? Any suggestions or help would be appreciated. As a side note, it was a good reminder not to get too down when things arenít going well, they can ALWAYS get worse.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Check the torque on the screws; it should be reasonable. Maybe Murphy can give you the inch-pounds of torque.

    On the repair, dill through the crack and fit a hardwood dowel with good quality epoxy. Color the dowel to match the wood. Don't expect it to be pretty but it will be functional. Good luck. J.

  3. #3
    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Ruger has always been really good about fixing stuff I broke. I'd give them a call and send it their way.

    Yk

  4. #4
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    572

    Default

    I'm guessing your stock just weakened over time and that is what caused your groups to slowly get worse. Then it just happened to get a visible crack while sitting on your bench. It could be that your stock wasn't fitted quite right and was directing more recoil force into the tang area than into the recoil lug. That seems to be a fairly common crack with heavy hitters like .338, .375, etc. I honestly wouldn't try to fix it--don't want it to happen again at just the wrong moment. I would just put a new stock on it. If you like laminate, Boyds should have one for you. And there are tons of synthetics.

    I would tell you to send it back to Ruger, but my recent experience with them tells me that you'd be better off doing it yourself (or letting a trained chimp do it for that matter). If it was me, I'd get a synthetic stock with a full length aluminum bedding block and put it on. That will take most of the variables out of the equation as far as inconsistent pressures, etc.

  5. #5
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    648

    Default update

    Just to update for future forum search miners:
    I removed the stock and while it was hard to tell there didnít seem to be much in the way of torque on the bedding angled screw. Too subjective though to really tell, nothing was actually loose. The cracks were confined to directly behind the tang and pretty shallow, but Iím writing the stock off. Of note, there did appear to be some slight rub marks in the channel the bedding screw goes through so a file job might have helped all along. The accuracy went south pretty fast, but I was in the middle of load development so I didnít think stock at first. It only went from just under MOA to about 2.5 MOA. Iíll post how Ruger handles the problem, but it is a five year old rifle with a discontinued (brown) stock and a lot of full bore loads through it. So the mystery continues. Better luck to others.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    CENTRAL PA
    Posts
    43

    Default crack

    dave, i got a thumb hole mamiated stock on a t-c omega .50 cal in-line. it only took about 30 shots through in and it cracked at the pistol grip. sent it back they replaced and has been ok since. i think you just get a stock now and then that has a weak spot. good luck

  7. #7
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    535

    Default Boyds...

    Dave, I have the same gun (Ruger 77MKII stainless/laminated stock .338 ) minus the laminate stock, but I bought a Boyds JRS classic from Cabelas that I'm going to put on it. Came with free shipping, I think I paid 129?? or thereabouts for it. Nice stock. I did have to sand up the barrel channel for a magnum barrel of course and I'm about to glass bed the recoil lug and tang area so I don't have any issues. Hopefully mine won't crack. If you need a replacement stock and still want a laminate though the Boyds are pretty nice for not a lot of money.

  8. #8

    Default Call Ruger

    I just received a Hawkeye version synthetic stock for my MKII. The two are interchangeable. The New Hawkeye synth. stock has a great softer recoil pad. I suspect your laminated stock gave up the ghost. They might even send you a new one. Doesn't hurt to ask.
    $81 + $3.50 from NH to MN - Hawkeye stock.
    Call: 603-865-2442, push menu #5.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    Just to update for future forum search miners:
    Of note, there did appear to be some slight rub marks in the channel the bedding screw goes through so a file job might have helped all along.

    This could of caused the crack. The screws holding the action in place should never touch wood. When they do they act as a mini recoil lug of sorts and can transfer all the recoil energy into the small area behind the screws.

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    419

    Default

    The problem IMO, was caused by the lack of recoil lug on the M77. In a cartridge like a
    .338 the recoil lug doesnt have enough bearing surface to distribute all the recoil to the lug area of the stock. So the extra recoil is distributed in the tang area and action screws. Usually the stocks are in-letted correctly from the factory, but after years of use they begin to get soft from moisture, oil, solvent and/or the begins to compress. The way to fix this is to use some type of bedding compound in the lug area to stiffen it, enlarge the front action screw hole, and remove some wood in the tang area. Seeing thread marks when loooking into the stock recoil lug screw area is a dead give away.

  11. #11
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    648

    Default All is well that ends well

    Despite almost no communications with me other than " send it in", I arrived back from moose hunting to find a new laminated stock waiting for me from Ruger. Pretty good response for a well used rifle.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •