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Thread: .500 S&W as a Global Hunting Round

  1. #1

    Default .500 S&W as a Global Hunting Round

    I don't own a .500 or even hunt with a handgun,(I do carry a .40 in the woods as a backup) but was curious if there was any reports on the .500 for Browns, Yukon Moose? Buffallo? Maybe Elephant??

  2. #2

    Default .500 "Globalist"

    I believe that if you are a skilled handgunner and hunter, you could take any current species of mammal with a .500 S&W with a heavy hardcast wide flat nosed bullet. Everything has already been taken with the .44 mag, .454 Casull, .475 Linebaugh, etc., so why not the .500?

  3. #3
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    Yeah, that may sound good in theory but there is only one country where you can legally take a handgun to hunt with and I don't think there is much elephant or buffalo hunting in RSA, though it could be arranged. You may have to settle for the good ole US of A and that may be on the endangered list very soon.

    What is it about that S&W 500 that makes people think they are magically a world class handgunner?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    What is it about that S&W 500 that makes people think they are magically a world class handgunner?
    I think you missed the boat on this one. I credit the 500 w/ hard core factory loads with spanking many an Alaskan so hard they loose confidence in their ability.

    Ak
    (Not a world class hunter, but my thumb is sore.)

  5. #5

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    The point is, no big pile of powder and gaping hole in a steel tube is going to compensate for inability to point it where it belongs with the consistency required of a hunting arm.

    I'm a handgunner of long experience and I shoot a lot. I've hunted extensively with big revolvers and singleshopts. I'm figuring it will take me between 1000 and 2000 rounds of factory loads or equivalents to get my 500 around to where I want my skills to be, then 250-500 rounds a month to keep them there for hunting. It's going to take lots more than that for a person with less experience.

    That will break the bank for the vast majority of shooters, and meanwhile take away both time and money they're now spending on other gun and hunting interests. Meanwhile there's going to be pain to deal with and work around on long shooting sessions.

    I'm just not confident many folks will ever do that with the 500. Most are buying it because they like to read the ballistics even if they can't really shoot it. Just trying to make up for poor marksmanship with paper ballistics.

    Pure flatulance in the wind, in my book.

  6. #6

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    The 475 Linebaugh and the 500 Linebaugh have both taken Elephant successfully. Otto Candice has used both. With the 475 he cut down Trophy Bonded Sledge Hammer solids to fit in the revolver and wound up at about 390 grains with this load out of a 475 Linebaugh revoler he got 40 inches of penetration on a frontal brain shot on a bull Elephant. In the 500 Linebaugh he used a 450 grain metal tipped hard cast at about 1250FPS and reported that he got nearly as much penetration as his big bore rifles. Otto did this before the Punch bullets were available from Belt Mountain

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I don't remember the name of the owner of CH-4D, I had a conversation with him a few years ago about his and others hunt in Africa where all they used was the then new S&W 500. His comments about the performance was that thy were all amazed by the performance on the game they shot.

    The use of the S&W .500 here in Alaska, has been tough to follow. A couple of guys I know shot brown bear, never recovered bullets from shoulder shots that killed the bears. As for moose, a friend of mine shot a cow in the head, the bullet went the length of the spine and exited out the tail end of the spine and was not recovered.

    I just don't think the question is really that hard to answer. I think if you ask yourself, will a 45-70 kill all of these different animals? If you have your answer about the 45-70 then you have an answer about the S&W .500
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8

    Default Magic?

    "What is it about that S&W 500 that makes people think they are magically a world class handgunner?"

    I don't think anyone stated that just having a .500 S&W would create a perfect world. I stated that if a person was a skilled handgunner and hunter then the potential was there for bringing anything down. The poster was just curious about the .500's capabilities and I think they are on pretty high ground. I have no idea what he is capable of and wouldn't recommend the .500 if he hasn't had much experience with magnum cartridges. I wouldn't personally recommend a .40 for trail carry in Alaska, at least.
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  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default 500..

    Most people rush out and buy the latest and greatest. The more it cost, the better. Reading over the ballistics and load data with an erection. Then they run out and pay top dollar for a gun that they really can't justify owning. I know that is why I bought my 500! Ha ha. And it is the bee's knees man. Wonderful gun with incredibly smooth action. I got it for float trips that my wife and I take each Fall. Always around the bears it seems on those trips. 10-14 days at a time in the middle of nowhere. We have had bears in camp on two out of the last three trips. All good bears luckily. Just curious. Being bears. But if I ever awaken with one sticking his head through my tent, I will be glad I got the 500. I just hope I don't catch the tent on fire. Why would anyone try to justify the usage/purpose of such a gun? Who could question its dominance? Armchair outdoorsmen, that is who. Cold steel equals peace of mind. 44, 454, 500... Pick you own flavor. In skilled hands, they are all capable of killing anything that moves.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    "What is it about that S&W 500 that makes people think they are magically a world class handgunner?"

    I don't think anyone stated that just having a .500 S&W would create a perfect world. I stated that if a person was a skilled handgunner and hunter then the potential was there for bringing anything down. The poster was just curious about the .500's capabilities and I think they are on pretty high ground. I have no idea what he is capable of and wouldn't recommend the .500 if he hasn't had much experience with magnum cartridges. I wouldn't personally recommend a .40 for trail carry in Alaska, at least.
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    I wonder if anybody is up for a Tee-shirt that says "Bears beware, I have an S&W .500"?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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