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Thread: A Lingcod question

  1. #1
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    Default A Lingcod question

    I'm in the midst of planning a trip to SE for coho, halibut, and rockfish for next August. It's likely that lingcod will also be amongst the available fish for harvest, provided I book sometime after August 15th.

    I understand the limit on lingcod is quite restricted, usually one per year. If so, is it better (eating quality) to catch and keep one of the larger lingcod (e.g., 30+lbs); or is it better to keep a smaller one (15-20lbs)?

    I know that it's much better (eating quality) to keep two 50 lb halibut than one 100lber. But what about lingcod? If the annual limit is one, I need to make a good decision on what to retain and what to release.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Coho:

    This is the info from the regs:

    Lingcod: The 2008 season, bag, possession, size, and annual limits for the following areas are as follows:
    Inside Southeast area near Ketchikan
    Season: May 16–November 30
    Limits: for non-guided Alaska residents—
    1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit;
    for nonresidents and guided anglers—
    1 daily, 1 in possession,
    30-inch minimum and 40-inch maximum size limit;
    nonresident annual limit of 1 fish, harvest record required.
    Outer Prince of Wales Island area
    Season: May 16–November 30
    Limits: for non-guided Alaska residents—
    1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit;
    for nonresidents and guided anglers—
    1 daily, 1 in possession,
    30-inch minimum and 35-inch maximum size limit;
    nonresident annual limit of 1 fi sh, harvest record required.
    Northern Southeast area
    Season: May 16–June 15 and August 16–November 30
    Limits: for non-guided Alaska residents—
    1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit;
    for nonresidents and guided anglers—
    1 daily, 1 in possession,
    30-inch minimum and 35-inch maximum size limit;
    nonresident annual limit of 1 fish, harvest record required.

    You might want to check the site: http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/state...t/SEregion.pdf

  3. #3
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Keep a nice big ling, generally there is no difference between an old one and a young one, but eat him quickly. Don't let him sit in the freezer for 4 months. They are excellent table fare, better than halibut I think. I like to eat mine within a month or so of catching him.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  4. #4
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    last year i caught a 50lb ling, and when i was vacuum sealing it, i noticed a bunch of little red and green worms in the flesh (maybe pulled out 15 or so), is this pretty common? my friends told me it is, and said they'd die when cooked or frozen. still a little gross. evidently this is true in the belly meat of larger halibut too?

  5. #5
    Member Anglette's Avatar
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    most fish have worms you dont even see. Your friend is right, when you cook your fish, they die and it just adds more protein to your diet

  6. #6
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    all the Lings Ive caught have been 40-50 inches and loved every one I ate.In-fact Ling goes faster here than our Halibut.Keep whatever size dude.

  7. #7
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    Default Luscious lings...

    You will love this species.

    This one is a broiler or a baker or a griller; to fry is a sacriledge.

    Ling Cod is my almost-the-top-of-the-list Pacific fish topped only by Black Cod.

    Take whatever size you can get and enjoy it...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  8. #8

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    I have had really good ling cod, but I have had it really bad too. I caught a beast of a fish (almost 50 pounds) a few years ago in Res Bay. It was definitely full of worms. We filleted it on the boat, put it on ice, and vacume-packed that night. We ate some a few nights later and it tasted about as good as my left shoe. We tried a totally different preparation a few nights later and it did not fare better. Just my two cents but I think the smaller fish are much better.

  9. #9

    Default Res. Bay?

    Quote Originally Posted by MVA View Post
    I caught a beast of a fish (almost 50 pounds) a few years ago in Res Bay. It was definitely full of worms. We filleted it on the boat, ....
    I hope you meant OUTSIDE Res. Bay or people on this forum will descend and attack...
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  10. #10
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Love ling the best eating. No difference in taste from a small to a big one.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  11. #11

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    Yes, outside the Bay, around the Chiswell Islands. After all of these other posts I am starting to wonder what was wrong with my fish.

  12. #12
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MVA View Post
    Yes, outside the Bay, around the Chiswell Islands. .
    I was there yesterday and man did I land allot of lings. No keepers
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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