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Thread: Transporting meat without a pickup

  1. #1

    Default Transporting meat without a pickup

    I'm planning to bowhunt up the haul road for caribou pretty soon, the first time I've hunted anything you have to cut up to bring home. (I learned to hunt on whitetails within a mile of the house.) I've been reading a lot here and in a couple books about caring for meat, but I've still got one big question: Where do you put your game bags when you're driving back from the slope (to Fairbanks, for me) and don't have a pickup?

    I've got a small SUV that doubles as a tent, camp, etc. I'd just as soon not share the inside of it with my game bags, and if I would probably put them in a garbage bag or something so they don't leak any fragrant juices in the back, but then I'd worry about ventilation. I thought about tying them to the top, but it seems like rain and dust could be a problem, and scavengers if I park to sleep overnight. In your experience, what works?
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

  2. #2
    Member Casper50's Avatar
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    Default

    Tn your concerns about putting the meat on top are valid. Buy a cartopper or something similar.

  3. #3

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    Thanks Casper.

    On a related note, does anyone know a good safe way to store spare gas so you're not risking a spill or getting lots of fumes in your vehicle? Coldfoot to Deadhorse was about 5/6 of a tank for me and I'd like a little more wiggle room if I'm driving around looking for animals.

    I guess a cartopper might be the solution there, too, but I can't imagine it's a good idea to have the meat in an enclosed space with gas fumes.
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

  4. #4

    Default

    gET ONE OF THOSE RACKS THAT GO IN THE RECIEVER, THATS WHERE i WOULD PUT THE GAS. IT WOULD NOT BE A GOOD IDEA TO STORE GAS AND MEAT TOGETHER.

  5. #5
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    If you have a reciever hitch on your suv you could get a rack that plugs into your hitch,put your game bags in ice chests. Seal the lid shut with duct tape to keep the dust out.

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    Big Dad , You're to fast

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Default yup

    Quote Originally Posted by Turkey Run View Post
    If you have a reciever hitch on your suv you could get a rack that plugs into your hitch,put your game bags in ice chests. Seal the lid shut with duct tape to keep the dust out.
    We do the same, we will also put a frozen gallon jug of water in there to help keep the meat cool.

  8. #8

    Default

    Grab yourself several of those cheap square plastic totes with snapon lids- Rubbermade is one brand, but there are others. Nest them in your car for the trip up, even use them for gear totes. Once you've got your game you can put them on a car rack or stow them in the car, depending on the weather and loading arrangements. It sure controls any drip while also protecting from rain or whatever if you add the lids. I prefer not to add the lids unless absolutely necessary, in order to allow meat to continue airing. If you're overnighting on the way home, be sure to pop the tops to allow more airing. Heck, these things work so well I even use them in the bed of my truck, with or without the canopy.

  9. #9

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    +1 to what BrownBear said. Don't use garbage bags, that's one sure way to spoil your meat. Cabelas sells game bags, get some of those and put them into those plastic containers and you should be just fine.

  10. #10
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default do not

    put the meat into plastic bags or plastic containers until the temp of the interior of the thickest slab of meat has reached ambient temperature - and then you should add some ice blocks to the container - don't get the meat wet as wet meat is more bacteria prone than dry meat.

    The hitch haulers are a very good way to extend your hauling capacity.....USE ratchet straps or risk loosing your haul.......I lost a cooler of clams on sunday cuz I was tired and stupid - put the bungies on and called it good - not many were waisted as some lucky soul picked up most of them.

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