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Thread: A question for those that own .45-70 Guideguns

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    Default A question for those that own .45-70 Guideguns

    Well, with a young growing family and not alot of extra funds at the end of the day, i am thinking of depleting my reloading supplies and my firearm collection. I am thinking of going with my .45-70 Guidegun with fiber optic open sites and an over the reciever mounted leuopold 2x compact in Leupold quick release rings. My current hunting situations never allow for a longer than 200 yard shot and for all intensive purposes i feel the Guidegun is the one to keep as i will never feel undergunned. I can also go in and dog bush with open sights utilizing the quick release scope rings. I will also of course keep a .22 Thoughts on utilizing this set up as my go to gun???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Win94 View Post
    .....My current hunting situations never allow for a longer than 200 yard shot and for all intensive purposes i feel the Guidegun is the one to keep as i will never feel undergunned.......
    I thought I was in a similar situation about 20 years ago. I relied on a bolt action rifle with scout scope and shortened barrel. Turned out there were a lot more longer shots than I had anticipated in my future.

    I now have 3 rifles I rely on. My guide gun (in .450 Marlin) has ghost ring sights and is unscoped. It's basically a trail rifle taken when big game season isn't open (which isn't often anymore, really). I still have my .338 A-bolt with the scout scope. I used it recently on a black bear hunt.

    But I also have a .300 WinMag with a 3x10 scope. There's plenty of alpine/tundra/big swamp hunting opportunity in Alaska.

    Keep the guide gun, but also keep a long shooter.

  3. #3

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    I can put myself in your shoes by looking back at the same period in my life-- young family, tight money, and too many guns hanging around. I had a rather large collection acquired before marriage, but had to thin it to pay for two babies and college.

    Bottom line for me in that era, I had to get game to eat, and no screwing around about it. I couldn't afford to pass up chances at game any more than I could afford to keep several guns.

    I kept trimming and trimming till I got back to a scoped bolt (06) and a lever (358). When push came to shove and I finally had to drop down to one gun, the lever went. The 358 was even flatter shooting than a 45-70, so that should speak to you.

    I know the pain of trimming back, believe me. The stuff I got rid of included eight pre-64 Model 70's NIB in unusual calibers. I cringe every time I think of how little I got for those guns, compared to today's prices. But then I look at my grown kids, successful career following college, and comfortable lifestyle. I think I chose right, even if it hurt at the time.

    If I was going back down to one gun today, it would still be that old beat up 06 bolt. And quite a few dandies have snuck back into the safe in the last 40 years, including a couple of guide guns. When choosing one gun to feed a family, leave sentiment at the door and pick the most versatile gun for the job. I love my guide guns, but they're not the most versatile, no matter what your heart says.

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    I very much appreciate the input from you individuals that have been through this same connumdrum. My thinking on the Guidegun is just in the last 10 years i haven't had a shot longer than 150 yards and the Guidegun also gives me the confidence when i take my 5 year old daughter stream fishing in grizz country and black bear country as a defensive tool. So with this in mind i am currently seeing it as more versatile than even my .30-06 My goal is a smaller reloading area, one can of powder maybe two types of bullets 405 grain hard casts and 350 grain jacketed. With a Ruger 10/22 as well, i would be set for a long time until i can afford to get back into the gun collecting game i once took part in.
    Last edited by Win94; 08-05-2008 at 09:54. Reason: grammer

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Win94 View Post
    I very much appreciate the input from you individuals that have been through this same connumdrum. My thinking on the Guidegun is just in the last 10 years i haven't had a shot longer than 150 yards and the Guidegun also gives me the confidence when i take my 5 year old daughter stream fishing in grizz country and black bear country as a defensive tool. So with this in mind i am currently seeing it as more versatile than even my .30-06 My goal is a smaller reloading area, one can of powder maybe two types of bullets 405 grain hard casts and 350 grain jacketed. With a Ruger 10/22 as well, i would be set for a long time until i can afford to get back into the gun collecting game i once took part in.
    That sounds like a pretty good reflection of your local circumstances and personal needs. Sorry you have to trim, but glad you've found your solution.

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    Family first but in saying that i will never be unarmed.

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    Well, if your a guy like me that depends more on Fred Meyer or Carr’s to supply your food than your hunting success (or lack there of) then I can see your point. I personally spend far more time camping and fishing with my young children as they are too small to partake in the hunting stuff, and I only have two weeks vacation a year that I prefer to spend with my family rather than hunting. That said, the Guide Gun is ideal for what I use it for…….. defense. We never go anywhere without lever action carbine in the truck, on the ATV or hanging off my shoulder. If I were in your position, I would probably make the same choice, protection first, hunting second.

    I will add this for your consideration though. You can find a good used 30-06 for around $350 if you are willing to shop for awhile, and when you look at the “grand scheme” of things, that $350 isnt really going to amount to much for your family. For me, that works out to about 3 tanks of gas in the truck, or 2 trips to the grocery store……….. when you look at the benefit from the $350, try and look at it from the perspective of your overall income. I would imagine that it amounts to no more than a tiny fraction. Perhaps you can find a way to keep one more. A .22, your Guide Gun and a bolt gun would leave you in a pretty good place.

    Besides………… “Super Sarah” is gonna get us all a nice fat “energy rebate”………… you’ll have more money than you will know what to do with!
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Win94, I was in your shoes some 23 yrs. back and a young wife and kids coming out of the woodwork so I kept my Sako L61R .338 Win. Mag and 1 .44 Mag. Super Blkwhk. and a Marlin .22 Papoose. Throughout the yrs. I had acquired many pistol, shotguns and rifles, some were traded or sold and kept-still going on. I did however own 1 .45-70 aka. .457WWG and literally gave that up to my kid brother. It worked well within its range but.......not an all around rifle-sorry. What has worked with me was getting in close to Grizzlies and Moose with it and putting the heavies in them-works effectively!

    Hope that has helped.

  9. #9

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    I am young (23) and married with a new 3 month old son. I have been blessed with a financial situation that will allow me to never worry about funds and have used that to amass quite a firearms collection. HOWEVER, In the last 13 years of hunting big game (my whole hunting career) only 2 rifles have been used in the field. A custom 270 that I used for everything up to 3 years ago when I built a 375 H&H and I have used that for everything since and the 270 is now what my wife uses. My point is this, collecting and having a bunch of guns is great, but if I had to I would have no issue with just one rifle and spending my money on my family. In fact that 270 has killed 23 big game animals and at least 15 of them came when I was a poor student who mowed lawns for money to hunt with.

    Go out and get a nice 270, 30.06 or even a 375, scope it well, and enjoy it...It is really all you need.

  10. #10

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    keep the .45-70, you dont need anything else. if you dont already know how, learn to get in close to prey and stalk it, PRACTICE shooting the .45-70. so many people want to buy a big magnum, go to the range one time a year only to sight in the scope, and blow the dust off it once the hunt comes around.

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    FWIW .45-70 is an excellent long range cartridge, its got a trajectory like a rainbow, but if the shooter knows what they are doing 200+ yard shots are quite possible (just ask the buffalo hunters of yesteryear). While a Marlin Guide Gun is isn't the ideal platform for shooting .45-70 long ranges, they are accurate enough that with a well practiced shooter they will get the job done in a pinch.
    Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for.

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    x2 AK. Well said.

  13. #13

    Default 45-70

    Sounds like you have your priorities straight: protect and feed the family, cut down expenses, downsize, have a handy short easy toting rifle that can go anywhere.

    The GG will do the job, and you can always add a 30-06 bolt later for not too much money when the time comes ( and if you just gotta' have a bolt gun for a few days, probably someone can come up with a loaner.)

    Hats off to you for thinking this one through putting your loved ones first.

    Been there, done that and could afford only 1 rifle for years.

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    Default good all around

    The guide gun in 45/70 is a good all around gun. i have been hunting/guideing for over 20 years and the fact is most of the time shots are under 200 yrds, and regardless of what most guys will tell you, most hunters shouldnt shoot past that anyway. 200 yrds and under with good loads the 45/70 is as good as it gets. I commend you on your values! I was awakened the other night by the dogs, there turned out to be a sow grizzly on my porch!! very glad the GG was just inside the door.

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