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Thread: 338wm reduced loads needed

  1. #1

    Default 338wm reduced loads needed

    Trying to develop a load my boy can use in my 338 sako carbine. He's become pretty good with it shooting cast lead using 20gr of 2400. Now I'm looking for a jacketed bullet load.

    I'd like to get a load for a 180gr nosler or 200 gr hornady going at about 2200-2400. Should be about like a 308 level, maybe similar to the new 338 Federal but in a 338wm case.

    My old speer manual shows a lightest load of 57gr of imr 4064 under the 200 gr for 2500 fps. I only have a couple of manuals and the online info seems to focus on the high end velocities. I guess i'll go with the speer loading and try working down if no one has a better suggestion... Thanks for your ideas.

  2. #2

    Default Be careful

    It is not safe to reduce the load in a case with the capacity of the .338 Win Mag too much. You can actually create a high pressure situation. This is with the jacketed bullets you mentioned. A 200 grain bullet at 2500 fps is a 30-06 type load and I don't recommend you go much below the recommended starting loads. They are where they are for a reason. Shooting a cast bullet with 20 grains of 2400 is do-able because it is a lead bullet and doesn't create the friction and pressure a jacketed bullet does. Did you put some sort of filler in the case ahead of the powder, like kapok or cream of wheat to hold that small amount of powder in place for proper ignition?

  3. #3
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Default

    Take another look in the speer manual. They generally have one reduced load in each caliber using one of thier SR powders. I'll check mine tonight.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by EricG View Post
    Trying to develop a load my boy can use in my 338 sako carbine. He's become pretty good with it shooting cast lead using 20gr of 2400. Now I'm looking for a jacketed bullet load.

    I'd like to get a load for a 180gr nosler or 200 gr hornady going at about 2200-2400. Should be about like a 308 level, maybe similar to the new 338 Federal but in a 338wm case.

    My old speer manual shows a lightest load of 57gr of imr 4064 under the 200 gr for 2500 fps. I only have a couple of manuals and the online info seems to focus on the high end velocities. I guess i'll go with the speer loading and try working down if no one has a better suggestion... Thanks for your ideas.
    Hornady's 200 grain FP (#3315 FP) was made for the 33 Winchester and is absolutely ideal for the velocity range you're looking at. I't discontinued, but worth tracking down. They're still floating around. And no, none of my stock is for sale. 50 grains of 3031 takes it down to 2500 fps. 45 grains brings it down into the 2300-2350 fps range. I got that slower load out of an older manual, but can't find the dang thing right now, but it's my standard starter load for new 338 shooters in the family. In fact it's the only 338 load my wife will shot. It's a sure-fire deer smacker out to a couple of hundred yards, so I bet it would be just fine for moose or elk out to 100 anyway, and maybe further.

  5. #5

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    MB - Thanks. The 2400 load came from the Lyman cast bullet handbook, no fill needed - works great for a nice little plinker. Kinda like putting a 44 mag load in a 338.

    Dave- my speer book does have 1 reduced load but it only shoots at 1800... a little too low.

    Brownbear - Thanks for the tip. That was exactly what I was looking for. I'll keep my eyes open for those hornady's too.


    Eric

  6. #6
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    The best load I ever developed for the same purpose you stated:

    Hornady 200 gr FP (33 Win bullet)
    35.0 gr SR 4759
    Fed 210

    1-1.5" groups

    Took a couple of Sitka's with this.

    The main "problem" was this it didn't really regulate to the same POI as my full house 250 gr NPT load.

  7. #7
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    4895 (either IMR or Hodgdon) should be a great powder for what you want to do. Given your target velocity, you'll still have enough powder in the case to get consistent ignition, and neither brand of 4895 has a reputation for detonation with less than a case full. I've used IMR 4895 with great success in .375 H&H as well as .30-06. You may want to experiment with regular vs. magnum primers to see which works better.

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeT View Post
    4895 (either IMR or Hodgdon) should be a great powder for what you want to do. Given your target velocity, you'll still have enough powder in the case to get consistent ignition, and neither brand of 4895 has a reputation for detonation with less than a case full. I've used IMR 4895 with great success in .375 H&H as well as .30-06. You may want to experiment with regular vs. magnum primers to see which works better.

    Mike
    Yes and these powders usually have a starting load in the manual that will be waht you want. I'd just use standard primers with this powder at least for the first try. Using 180-200 grain bullets at about 2600 fps is a pretty mild load for deer and such so that should get you what you want.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Using 180-200 grain bullets at about 2600 fps is a pretty mild load for deer and such so that should get you what you want.
    That compares well with the 358 Winchester. In several guns I load for, dropping down to even 2400 doesn't seem to behave any differently on deer than my 358's.

    We played with a couple of bullets intended for the 338 at 2200 to 2400 fps, and they showed minimal expansion on deer past 100 yards or so. Still dead deer, but a little slow happening. Just too stoutly built in anticipation of mag velocties I guess. But that 200 grain Hornady FP.... Wow! It expands beautifully, and really takes a deer down out to close to 200 yards.

    It's really worth tracking down some of the 200 grain FP's if you ever anticipate working with reduced loads for game.

  10. #10
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    If you can find them Nosler also made a 200 gr Ballistic Tip a few years back that work great on deer sized critters with IMR 4895 or H4350

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