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Thread: Red salmon weight after filleting?

  1. #1
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    Default Red salmon weight after filleting?

    How much will the fillets of one red salmon weigh? Just curious

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    The total filleted weight for 6 reds and 1 pink was about 24 lbs. Hope that helps.
    Jim

  3. #3

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    Reds can be pretty much anywhere between 6 and 14 pounds (live weight) so processed weight can vary quite a bit.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Default recovery rate

    If I'm not mistaken...I think the average recovery for salmon fillets is about 40-45% of the whole fish weight. So, if you have a 10 pound fish, you'll get 4 or 4.5 pounds of fillets. Somone's filleting skills (or lack thereof) can make it lower, however.

  5. #5

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    I dont know if this belongs here or not, but Im gonna post it anyways.

    I filet my fish at home, then cook the rest on a baking sheet in the oven. When its cooked, I take all the meat off and get a good 1-2 lbs of meat off those bones.

    Then I crumble the meat and I make salmon cakes. Awesome for breakfast...salmon cakes and eggs...yummy.

    Save A LOT of meat instead of feeding the bears.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    I dont know if this belongs here or not, but Im gonna post it anyways.

    I filet my fish at home, then cook the rest on a baking sheet in the oven. When its cooked, I take all the meat off and get a good 1-2 lbs of meat off those bones.

    Then I crumble the meat and I make salmon cakes. Awesome for breakfast...salmon cakes and eggs...yummy.

    Save A LOT of meat instead of feeding the bears.
    Should have thunk of that. I'll be doing that with my next few fish. Thanks.

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    Default

    Walsar, if ya do it like some people do, cutting the bellies off, and leaving a 1 / 2 inch thickness, to be thrown away with the back bone, then skinning whatís left, Iím guessing, you could get close to 1 / 4 of the live weight.

    Wasting that percentage of a Caribou should be illegal.

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  8. #8

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    When I worked in the seafood dept last summer the average sockeye fillet was 1.5-2.5 lbs.

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    Default Thanks

    Thanks guys, you've helped alot.

  10. #10

    Default Depends on what fish processor you take them to.

    If you take them to Big Blue .5 lbs.

    If you take them to a smaller mom and pop shop, 20 lbs.

    If you like tail fillets, take them to big blue. It'll make you feel good. If you caught 4 fish, you'll wind up with 16 tail fillets!

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    Member monello's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    cook the rest on a baking sheet in the oven. When its cooked, I take all the meat off and get a good 1-2 lbs of meat off those bones.
    You can also smoke the 'bones'. There is a bit of meat on them and if the filleter is not that skilled, quite a bit of meat left on. They did this at a campground in Ninilchik and the bones became a favorite snack.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default King Carcass

    I like to eat the King Carcass. some lemon, cracked pepper, dash of cayenne, and lots of garlic....bake in over till done....makes enough eats for 2 people on a small king - 4 people on medium king - and the whole neighborhood on the next King I get (next year of course)!

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    Default Stop it

    you guys are making me hungry!

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    Default

    As a "ball park" estimate, take 50% of the live weight as an estimate of the weight of the fillets.

    Some fish, like salmon, that might be a bit high (actual might be 45%). For other fish, like halibut, it might be a bit low (actual might be 55%). Alot will depend on the skill of the person doing the filleting and the maturity of the fish (eggs/no eggs).

    But as an average, it's close.

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    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default

    I did some weighing this past few weeks and 50%-54% of the fish weight was my norm. A nice red is 10lbs figure a little more than 5 lbs of fillets off it. More if you want the belly meat.

  16. #16
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    I dont know if this belongs here or not, but Im gonna post it anyways.

    I filet my fish at home, then cook the rest on a baking sheet in the oven. When its cooked, I take all the meat off and get a good 1-2 lbs of meat off those bones.

    Then I crumble the meat and I make salmon cakes. Awesome for breakfast...salmon cakes and eggs...yummy.

    Save A LOT of meat instead of feeding the bears.
    I don't know about the % of live weight but after fileting I smoke the remaining meat that is attached to the bones. It comes off the bone easily and there is no waste. Also I have boiled the reaminder and picked the bones out. It makes great stock and meat for salmon dip or salmon patties. I smoke the bellies and colars too. Eggs are saved for bait, so it lives little waste. One of these days I will try fish head soup.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    Out of curiosity one year when dipnetting I was curious what the average fillet weighed. I found that the fillets of 10 kenai reds came out to 40 pounds +/- so have figured on a 4# average.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    I don't know about the % of live weight but after fileting I smoke the remaining meat that is attached to the bones. It comes off the bone easily and there is no waste. Also I have boiled the reaminder and picked the bones out. It makes great stock and meat for salmon dip or salmon patties. I smoke the bellies and colars too. Eggs are saved for bait, so it lives little waste. One of these days I will try fish head soup.

    Fish head soup is really good. Same as the rest of the body if not BETTER.

    Im sure someone could stay at the russian cleaning tables when the run is going strong and ask everyone for their carcasses and EASILY collect 20-30 pounds of meat.
    Sounds like something I would do...

    next year...more salmon cakes.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

  19. #19
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I have used the heads for soup, haven't tried baking the carcusses to get the meat off the bones for salmon paddies, but that sounds like a good plan. Nothing better then enjoying the cheeks in the soup.

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    Default Backbone meat

    When you fillet a king the backbone meat can be put on the barbeque and its ready to eat in 10 minutes. I know fishing guides who never get to catch their own kings but get the backbones from clients and eat this stuff all week long in their sandwiches. I do the same. BC

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