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Thread: Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon

  1. #1
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    Default Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon

    I have some family coming up from WI to catch some salmon - and I know that ADN indicated fishing at the lagoon was hot, but I was wondering if anyone could verify before I make the trip down from Ancorage.

    Also any tips on catching Silvers at the lagoon would be much appreciated, since it will be my first trip there.

    Thanks a Million

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by cONDENSED View Post
    I have some family coming up from WI to catch some salmon - and I know that ADN indicated fishing at the lagoon was hot, but I was wondering if anyone could verify before I make the trip down from Ancorage.

    Also any tips on catching Silvers at the lagoon would be much appreciated, since it will be my first trip there.

    Thanks a Million
    I was there less than a week ago. ITs so hot I dreamt of it last night.

    Im not joking.

    Its 'hot' in the sense that there are a lot of fish, but 'cold' in terms of them biting.

    There are A LOT of fish in there going in circles over and over and over.

    They dont really bite though. Of 1000 + casts, I got 2 to chase, and only one to really bite.

    This is my tip to you though. Floss them. You have to use really thin line ( 8-10 lbs test) and a fly that sinks slowly.

    When you see a school coming, toss your fly out, tighten your line, and wait. Wait until you feel your fly being pulled, then set the hook.

    Whatever you do, do not jerk because you will hook one in the body. You have to be really patient or you will foul hook a lot of fish, and ruin the meat for the guys who hook them in the mouth. I hate catching a fish in the mouth only to see he's got 4-5 deep gashing snag marks on him. Its like catching bad food.

    I have to tell you though, its long, and annoying. I spent 3 hours trying to floss them until I finally hooked one in the mouth.

    In my opinion, its worth it to go and see, but not really to take home 3-4 fish. Too long of a process.

    UNLESS...

    You have a magic touch . Of the 100s and 100s of people I saw there, I only saw one lady hook up consistently in the mouth. Before fishing, I would walk around and see what everbody was using.
    This lady had an egg sucking leech? (I think). She hooked 3 in the mouth in 10 minutes while I stood next to her.

    She said: "It aint the fly...its my skill!!"

    I laughed. Then cried cuz I couldnt catch many .

    Oh yeah, almost forgot. HAve your whole family wear sunglasses even if its cloudy.
    Protect your eyes out there.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

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    Very cool, thanks for the detailed post!

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    Default Ship Creek

    For a fraction of the gas you can take your family down to Ship Creek in anchorage and try "flossing", as SodaBiscuit discussed, or throw Vibrex, or fish eggs under a bobber.

    The timing on the tides is important at Ship. With eggs you want to fish the incoming or outgoing tide AT THE HEAD OF THE TIDE. That mean right where the water starts to go slack.

    You can flip for silvers at any point in the tide when the tide is out and the river is fast flowing.

    Success with Virbex seems to be on the incoming tide after the tide has past and the water really slows. An hour before or after the high seems most productive.
    Hope this helps....jim

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    Thanks Jim, I am definitely planning on heading to Ship Creek - thanks for the tips. I am just trying to get the best odds possible, since I can't allow my family to fly up here and get skunked!

    Wait, I thought that snagging lagoon in the lagoon was legal - or is that later in the year?

  6. #6
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    Default Snaggin' in the Lagoon

    Snagging is opened by Emergency Order only from the Dept. of Fish and Game and typically comes at the end of the season, later in August or Sept.

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    Gotcha, Thanks.

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    Fished dudiak lagoon on 1 Aug, PM high tide, outgoing. I was using a fly rod, and pretty much the only one standing in the channel between the two rock formations. It was fast and furious for 40 minutes--five hook ups--lost four due to the swift, outgoing current in the middle, all in the mouth--landed one.

    The fifth one swam with the current, maxed my drag because I didn't want to run over a couple of kids, *SNAP*--took my nail knot down, and left me with a flyline whip wound on the side of my mouth...silvers' revenge. Could have been worse though...a hook inbedded in my cheek, or worse--in one of the kids...

    That was around 2 hours after high tide. When the channel was 6-8 feet wide, and 18-24 inches deep, you could see schools of silvers (15-20 fish at a time) darting in and out of the lagoon (with polarized glasses). I couldn't understand why no one else was where I was...After my whip wound, the number of fish running through declined, so I cut my losses and called it a day.

    I was using a chartreuse fly, 6 ft leader, with one, #2 split shot, sight fishing the concentrations, letting the line drift to its end, then watching the fish mouth the lure, or sometimes watching the fish trying to swim away with it...yes, it was that clear at that time of the tide.

    We went for halibut the next day, so I missed the next PM high, then had to come home .

    Good Luck!

    P.S.--Like others, I saw a lot of blatant snagging in the lagoon proper, and these guys were whooping it up, having a good ole' time, as they ripped their trebles through the schools.

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    Default Another tip

    The most important thing to do is get there before the tide starts coming in. Station yourself directly across from the entrance to the lagoon so the incoming tide is coming directly towards you. Lots of people will be there too.

    Rig up with a float and an 18-inch leader with a 3/0 hook. Use herring or a gob of cured salmon eggs under your float. Eggs might be hard to find but herring are usually available at the bait shop across the street. Plug cut your herring. Toss your rig into the incoming current. If you've done this right, your rig will be floating directly towards you. Hang on, that's when they hit.

    I've had the most success with plug cut herring. Check with the folks around you if you need help. Most folks are happy to lend a hand, but only before the tide starts coming in. Once the tide starts to turn, everyone will be fishing, not teaching.

    Don't expect huge coho in August from the ND Lagoon. Most are in the 3 to 5 lb range. But if you have time, you might consider going to the mouth of the Anchor River. Hit the pools near the mouth at low tide with cured eggs. There should be some fresh coho around.

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