Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: advice on game bags

  1. #1
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    839

    Default advice on game bags

    I'm looking for advice on game bags. I just found three Gary King cotton bags W/ties. They aren't as heavy as the Cabela's ones I've been using but I was wondering if they work to keep the flies off the meat well-enough. I also found some fine mesh bags sold by Cabela's as Caribou/ Moose bags and came in a three pack. They had three small pieces of string with them. Surprising what you find in the deep dark reaches of a garage. Thanks in advance ,Tom

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I would really like to try the TAG bags. Does anyone know where to find them around Anchorage or the Valley?

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Can't speak with experience on the ones you are using.
    I have TAG bags that I hope to try out next Sunday. Didn't get anything to stick in them when I boufght them last year, but they sure are nice & light in the day pack. Wiggy's on Old seward near Diamond has them.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  4. #4

    Default

    Whatever you do, do not use stretchy mesh bags. When taut the mesh spreads open enough for flies to lay eggs through the mesh. Tightly woven bags should be used always.

    The bags I have been using for the last 15 years are Dickinsons I think, the high end bags, not their cheesy bags. The have performed perfectly and completely cover a LARGE bull moose hind quarter. I don't know if they still are available, they were purchased at Mt. View sports way back when.

    Remeber even with new bags to inspect all the seems before you take them to the field. Having to sew a seam when you need to cover a quarter is not a good time. Don't forget a sewing kit in your gear !

  5. #5
    Member akjeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    788

    Default Tag bags

    I ordered my Tag bags from Pristine ventures in Fairbanks. I ordered two sets of moose size bags for this year. Spendy, but worth the money.

    http://www.pristineventures.com/products_gameBags.html

    Last season we used four or five different style bags. Two moose. We had Tag bags in the caribou/sheep size. A front quarter will just sqeeze into it (very tight we tore one bag). No flies could get through. The heavy duty canvas, no name bags worked equally as well. The bags that didn't work as well, and the flies got in on some meat (lost one bag of misc neck meat to maggots), were the more expensive name brand bags(these are the stretchy ones). we also used a roll of open ended bags and tied knots works ok until stretched. When hanging on the pole the stretchy bags simple will not hold up and the flies can inject their eggs through the stretched bag. TAG bags and heavy canvas prevent the flies from getting though. With the amount of money spent on gear and transportation, care of meat is critical. My money goes to TAG bags.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default game bags

    dont waste your money .. got to sportsmans and buy some tag bags worth every penny washable strong breatable love them . I have the moose size aliitle big for caribou but the work just as well

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hic4life View Post
    got to sportsmans and buy some tag bags worth every penny washable strong breatable love them .
    Why buy them at Sportsmans when multiple local shops carry them? Seriously folks, if we want the small specialty shops to be around in a few years, we need to support them.

    As for where to find TAG bags, they carry them at the Archer's Den in Eagle River. I think I've also seen them at Boondock, but I'm not sure. Wiggy's is the place to go if in Anchorage. Support the local shops!

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Why buy them at Sportsmans when multiple local shops carry them? Seriously folks, if we want the small specialty shops to be around in a few years, we need to support them.

    As for where to find TAG bags, they carry them at the Archer's Den in Eagle River. I think I've also seen them at Boondock, but I'm not sure. Wiggy's is the place to go if in Anchorage. Support the local shops!
    If Archers Den carries them then you solved my where to get em delima I do get nervous everytime I so much as drive by there cause I may just go in and buy that bow I have my heart set on... But with the wife starting college this year it just aint in the cards. Thanks for the heads up!

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kantishna River
    Posts
    7

    Default

    As a hunting guide, I have not been too impressed with TAG bags, since they tear easily if snagged by sharp bones and almost have too tight of a weave. If they get damp or wet, or the meat is not properly aired, they seem to promote souring. I would choose medium to heavy weight canvas if you choose to buy something, or bed sheets sewn to the appropriate size (this is the least expensive option, and most practical).

    Don't choose your bags by their ability to hang meat. It is important that all the meat should be hung directly to form a skin first, with the bag then placed over to keep the flies and debris off.

    Bags of loose meat will not survive long, regardless of the bag, since bacteria has been introduced in between the pieces. It will likely have eggs in it already and souring is almost a certainty due to the bacteria if you are in the field long.
    Last edited by Alaskanate; 08-03-2008 at 00:43. Reason: unfinished thought

  10. #10
    Member willster33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    122

    Default Bags

    How about the Sportmans brand canvas bags? I picked up some and they look a lot better then the cheese cloth bags from last year. I also have been thinking a lot about how to care for my game meat in the field for a Yukon hunt and found that some guys use lemon juice on there bags and also spray it on the meat to keep flys away, has any one done this?

    Will

  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,406

    Default do a search

    this topic has been hammered on the forum and if you do a search you'll find plenty of info. Lets not start the tag bag debate again

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    If Archers Den carries them then you solved my where to get em delima I do get nervous everytime I so much as drive by there cause I may just go in and buy that bow I have my heart set on... But with the wife starting college this year it just aint in the cards. Thanks for the heads up!
    Dude - since you just gave up the smokes, each week set aside the $$ you'd normally shell out for cigs...after about 12 months, you'll have enough for your bow!

  13. #13
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default TAG Bags at Wiggies Alaska

    That is where I bought mine. Mark there has the good stuff you need for hunting. He is a local shop plus a forum member. Good guy.

  14. #14

    Default

    Bags of loose meat will not survive long, regardless of the bag, since bacteria has been introduced in between the pieces. It will likely have eggs in it already and souring is almost a certainty due to the bacteria if you are in the field long.
    As a guide you certainly work with more meat than I and many others. However I have never had that problem on an extended hunt. If one is going on an extended hunt, they should bring extra bags to rotate meat to, particularly "wet" and or cut meat. Many times I have had a moose or caribou in camp for a week or more. On a flyout caribou hunt I had a caribou in bags for 10 days, never lost any of it due to spoilage or insects.

    If you have particularly wet or bloody meat, take it out of the bags and rotate it to another bag and exspose the wettest portions to outer side of the bag. Do this a few times if needed. The bag that the meat was just removed from can be spread out to dry as is or rinsed then dried to reuse if needed.

    It is important to be diligent about checking on hanging meat throughout every day. I do it at least 3 times every day .

    The best thing to hope for is some good hard frosts while it is hanging. It really knocks down the bacteria and chances of spoiling.

  15. #15
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    839

    Default

    thanks guys for the input. I'll just keep using the canvas Cabela's bags I've had for 15 years, I was very sceptible about the mesh style when I found them and the Gary King bags might due as a back-up , in case of a ripped bag.
    I plan on flying the meat out as soon as possible after I hopefully get a Caribou.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •