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Thread: Getting my .280 accurate: part II

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Getting my .280 accurate: part II

    So removing the pressure point helped a lot. I now have repeatability.
    However, the accuracy is still not up to my expectations for this round, or this rifle (Remington LSS .280 50th anni. 24" barrel).
    I'm now considering bedding the recoil tab and the action, but not the barrel (yet). Whats the preferred bedding compound and release agent? I was thinking a high tensile, low creap Epoxy like Scotchweld DP 420.
    Any other suggestions you fellers can throw at me?
    I was hoping to take the new Remy out on my sheep hunt next week, but not happy yet with it.
    Cheers
    Paul

  2. #2
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    So removing the pressure point helped a lot. I now have repeatability.
    However, the accuracy is still not up to my expectations for this round, or this rifle (Remington LSS .280 50th anni. 24" barrel).
    I'm now considering bedding the recoil tab and the action, but not the barrel (yet). Whats the preferred bedding compound and release agent? I was thinking a high tensile, low creap Epoxy like Scotchweld DP 420.
    Any other suggestions you fellers can throw at me?
    I was hoping to take the new Remy out on my sheep hunt next week, but not happy yet with it.
    Cheers
    Paul
    Marine-Tex. Go to any boat dealer and pick up a box.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  3. #3

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    You can get Brownells kit with stainless steel. Instrucions are included.

  4. #4

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    When you have the stock off for bedding see if there are any cracks in it. There shouldn't be if this is a new gun, but look especially around the receiver area. Are your shots all over the target or are they in a line? If they are in a line it could be caused by pressure points in the forend part of the stock or it could be damage to the crown of the rifle muzzel. If they are all over check your scope ring and scope base screws. The base screws should have had Blue Locktite or fingernail polish on them before they were intalled. If that isn't it there could be internal problems with the scope. When you bed the rifle make sure there are no tight spots at the receiver. Check the action bolts to see if they are loose. Also get some copper cleaner and clean the bore of the barrel good. Some times new barrels have tool marks that take a while to smooth out and they collect copper. Clean with solvent after cleaning with copper cleaner. How big of a pattern do you have now at 100 yards for 5 shots? Do you have a light weight barrel? They tend to heat up fast and move more. Wear ear protection when you target practice so you don't develope a flinch or loose part of your hearing.

  5. #5

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    When you choose a bedding compound get a gel instead of a liquid. It is easier to work with.

  6. #6

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    If you get a Brownells bedding kit it will have a release agent with it. I used Johnson's paste wax with pam sprayed over it the last time I bedded a rifle. Put modeling clay in holes where you don't want epoxy. Put tape around the trigger assemly with 3 layers on the muzzel side of the recoil lug and on the sides of it. Don't put tape on the back side of the recoil lug.

  7. #7
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Do not let any contact between the bottom of the lug and the bedding accrue when you bed the lug!

    I would pillar bed it if it was my rifle. It will cost you more to do it, but it's better.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    Do not let any contact between the bottom of the lug and the bedding accrue when you bed the lug!

    I would pillar bed it if it was my rifle. It will cost you more to do it, but it's better.
    Thanks for all the info gents.
    In this caliber, and with a 24" barrel, i have the feeling that this rifle should, and could be turned into a real tack driver. Must admit, i'm pretty dissapointed that i am having to put this much work into it. This is my first Remington i have purchased new, and while its a nice looking rifle, its accuracy has left much to be desired.

  9. #9

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    I've had lots of Remingtons over the years and all models and calibers have been tack drivers. Not saying there aren't problems with yours, but your experience really surprises me.

    While you're contemplating mods, I'd also take a closer look at your loads. Bullet jump, powder/bullet selection, twist rate vs bullet length, bench technique and more.

    That last point, bench technique, is a sneaker. I have found that different rifles simply prefer to be benched differently in terms of how you hold them and where you brace them. My 30-year old 700BDL in 7mm mag is still darned near a one-holer at 200 yards, but only if you keep your hand off the forend completely at the bench. My little Model 7 in 7-08 wants you to grab the forend from below and snug it down into the front rest real firm. And on and on.

  10. #10
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    Thanks for all the info gents.
    In this caliber, and with a 24" barrel, i have the feeling that this rifle should, and could be turned into a real tack driver. Must admit, i'm pretty dissapointed that i am having to put this much work into it. This is my first Remington i have purchased new, and while its a nice looking rifle, its accuracy has left much to be desired.
    http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0033309227667a.shtml

    I have not tried one of these yet, but I have read good things about it.

    The thing that intrigues me the most is, that if, I saw a radical change with this device on the barrel. I know the barrel is having a problem.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  11. #11
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default Sims Barrel De-Resonator

    Maybe.......I tried one on a .5 to 1.0 MOA 300 WM and could not detect any significant benefit. I called Sims and they stated that if one already had a rifle that shot MOA or less that it prob wouldn't improve on that!! Maybe worth a try but I would look else where for sig accuracy improvement.

  12. #12
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    Default Rem 280

    Yukoner, Your troubles sound familiar. I have a Rem KS custom mountian rifle. And like you had to float barrel, trigger job, and have the barrel lapped. When these were done it did become a shooter. If you are having copper fouling problems look at the barrel lapping. Made a big difference for me.

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