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Thread: Whats the best way to tell a rack size

  1. #1
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    Default Whats the best way to tell a rack size

    I ran into this problem last year when a big bull presented him self about 800 yards away.
    I could tell he was a big moose but couldn't make out brow times or guess if it was 50+. I got withen 450 yards and he semmed very big. I just didn't fell comfortable shootting a moose at that range with the wind conditions.

    Is there any good tricks to figure out a rack size??
    I figures his ears must be between 5-8 inches and went for there.

    Anyways thanks for any hints ot tips.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  2. #2

    Default

    Alaska Fish and Game have a great video out. It is called " Shoot don't shoot. Good luck on hunting

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    Default didn't shoot

    Thanks for the info!


    Also Good luck to you as well!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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    Premium Member jmg's Avatar
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    Default

    Good job on not shooting if you were uncomfortable with it. Seems every year there are people that think the best way to tell is to shoot it, then measure it.

    The fish and game video says that a large bull will have about 10" from base to base on the antlers. So if you can look at that distance, then stick two more of those on each side of his head out to the width of the antlers, you'd have a total of 50 inches (20 on each side of the head plus 10 for the head).
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

  5. #5

    Default Hunt Alaska Now by Dennis Conifer

    The book Hunt Alaska Now by Dennis Conifer is the best guide for estimating moose rack size that I have seen. It is worth its price just for its part.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  6. #6
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Width

    I don't know how much this would help at 450 yards but from eartip to eartip on a moose is about 24 inches. So there needs to be slightly over 1 foot to each side of his ears to be legal. Still I count brow tines. If I don't see a legal number of brow tines, I don't shoot - unless the rack is huge ( over 60 inches).

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motorboatn View Post
    I ran into this problem last year when a big bull presented him self about 800 yards away.
    I could tell he was a big moose but couldn't make out brow times or guess if it was 50+. I got withen 450 yards and he semmed very big. I just didn't fell comfortable shootting a moose at that range with the wind conditions.

    Is there any good tricks to figure out a rack size??
    I figures his ears must be between 5-8 inches and went for there.

    Anyways thanks for any hints ot tips.
    that's easy man - just grunt like a 48" bull! If he tucks tail and walks away, he's not legal...ir he bows his neck, grunts and heads straight for you to kick your A#$, he's over 50" for sure.

    just kidding man, +1 on the ADF&G video and the Dennis Confer book.

  8. #8
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default between bases

    its more like eight and half inches between bases....i dont' think i've ever seen one that was ten inches between on top.....so if you look at it that way you need 2 1/2 or 3 times that width per antler..if it has three of those widths plus in between the burrs your looking at a 56"
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  9. #9

    Talking Rack Size

    Check the lable on the bra.

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by owl View Post
    Check the lable on the bra.
    Dang 18 minutes too late....

  11. #11
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Default Exactly!

    Quote Originally Posted by owl View Post
    Check the lable on the bra.

    That was funny!
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  12. #12

    Default

    The space between the eyes is about 10" apart, the ears tips 24". I use those to judge. If it is big it is rather obvious. I shot a 58" bull last year, as soon as I saw him I knew he was legal, I didn't hesitate for an instant. A couple of years ago, my partner and I called in 7 bulls. We estimated them all at 48" or less and didn't shoot any of them. I am sure at least 1 of them was 50 but, it is better to leave it for next season than to make a mistake.

  13. #13
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Default

    On this thread of shoot/don't shoot....I was watching the hunting channel two mornings ago about an Alaskan *do-it-yourself* Caribou hunt. It was the last hour of the last day and all the Caribou were in velvet. Three small animal crested a ridge and the chase was on. They showed these guys running as hard as they could to cut off the three caribou. All were either cows or very immature bulls. The hunters *talked themselves into* believing the biggest one had to be a bull. As the camera zeroed in, all three went broadside, and as an avid hunter I immediately could tell there was not a penis sheath among the lot, but bang and one went down. They went up to the animal and found out bulls to not have utters and a vulva. I don't think there is ever a season for non residence do shoot a cow in velvet (July or Auguse my guess). I felt the show did a great job of showing how *excitement* can get the best of hunters. I commend motorboatn for his ability to think straight when the pressure is on!
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  14. #14
    Member .300wby's Avatar
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    Default Ear tips

    I am skeptical about this 24" ear tip thing. Is this supposed to be when their ears are laying straight out?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by .300wby View Post
    I am skeptical about this 24" ear tip thing. Is this supposed to be when their ears are laying straight out?
    I've always been a little leery of that standard myself. I am more comfy with the 10" from eye to eye standard...IF I am lucky enough to get a moose this year, I will check some of the measurements for my own edification.

  16. #16
    Premium Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    For what it is worth, there is now supposed to be a range finder that will "measure" a rack size - see archives - as I recall it will give a determination if rack exceeds 50" - I think it is currently being field tested by hunting guides.

  17. #17
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Leupold RX-IV Boone & Crockett

    For what it is worth, there is now supposed to be a range finder that will "measure" a rack size - see archives - as I recall it will give a determination if rack exceeds 50"

    Shphtr: Here's the description from Leup's site:

    • Revolutionary Trophy Scale™ technology will tell you if the rack on the game you’re viewing has the spread (in inches) you’re hunting for

  18. #18

    Default

    It is certainly accurate that the ears on a moose are about twelve inches long. However, if "rotated" down 90 degrees the distance tip to tip is usually between 30 and 32 inches not 24 inches. The distance between the burrs has to be added and that is usually between six and eight inches.
    Joe (Ak)

  19. #19
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default one caribou

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    On this thread of shoot/don't shoot....I was watching the hunting channel two mornings ago about an Alaskan *do-it-yourself* Caribou hunt. It was the last hour of the last day and all the Caribou were in velvet. Three small animal crested a ridge and the chase was on. They showed these guys running as hard as they could to cut off the three caribou. All were either cows or very immature bulls. The hunters *talked themselves into* believing the biggest one had to be a bull. As the camera zeroed in, all three went broadside, and as an avid hunter I immediately could tell there was not a penis sheath among the lot, but bang and one went down. They went up to the animal and found out bulls to not have utters and a vulva. I don't think there is ever a season for non residence do shoot a cow in velvet (July or Auguse my guess). I felt the show did a great job of showing how *excitement* can get the best of hunters. I commend motorboatn for his ability to think straight when the pressure is on!


    in many units nonresidents are allowed one caribou, meaning either sex, and even though some of those hunts do not begin until september 1 caribou are often still in velvet at that time, bulls and cows
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  20. #20

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    I am skeptical about this 24" ear tip thing. Is this supposed to be when their ears are laying straight out?
    When their ears are in the normal up or alert position. when they are flat out it is closer to 32 +".

    I use the eye spacing with much more confidence ,but use the ears as a secondary method.

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