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Thread: Flowers and fungus :)

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    Default Flowers and fungus :)





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    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Ray those are just extremely attractive photographs!

    I'm really hard pressed to pick one or another as best, but the top one probably wins.

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    Default Wow

    Ray, your pictures are coming along nicely. Very cool. Eat those shaggy manes! They are good (no alcohol with em though).
    Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd_Davidson View Post
    Ray those are just extremely attractive photographs!

    I'm really hard pressed to pick one or another as best, but the top one probably wins.
    Thanks, Floyd.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BTK View Post
    Ray, your pictures are coming along nicely. Very cool. Eat those shaggy manes! They are good (no alcohol with em though).
    Ben
    I had no idea those mushrooms were eatable (don't know much about mushrooms). Anyways, shortly after I took those photos, my wife mowed them with her lawn tractor

    By the way, it has been raining almost non stop around Fairbanks lately, that day (when I took the photos) we got a break with the weather. It was nice and sunny all day, and then the rain came back. Both the Chena and the Tanana River are quite high, and some homes have already flooded. Maybe by Sunday we will get another break. The temperatures are around $45 degrees, too.

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    Member tull777's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BTK View Post
    Ray, your pictures are coming along nicely. Very cool. Eat those shaggy manes! They are good (no alcohol with em though).
    Ben

    Really nice shots Ray! They all are amazing captures. And yes, for heck sake, those mushrooms are delish! Sauté them in butter, a little garlic and scramble eggs with them. Oh man, food of the Gods! You have to eat them ASAP, they wont keep well over night. They turn to ink.

    Thanks for sharing.
    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out.” ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

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    Quote Originally Posted by tull777 View Post
    Really nice shots Ray! They all are amazing captures. And yes, for heck sake, those mushrooms are delish! Sauté them in butter, a little garlic and scramble eggs with them. Oh man, food of the Gods! You have to eat them ASAP, they wont keep well over night. They turn to ink.

    Thanks for sharing.
    Thanks for telling me. There should be more coming up very soon with all of this rain.

    By the way, I used an EF 200mm f/2.8 L USM with a Kenko 12mm tube to close the distance. This lens is very sharp, and I mainly use it for taking pictures of moose and such. It has no IS, and that's why it costs onder $700.00. With IS it costs twice as much.

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    Member tull777's Avatar
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    The 200mm sounds like a good one. It has obviously performed well for you. I need a kenko set for my macro, had not thought about using them on other lens. Would they be strong enough to support a 100-400mm lens?

    Again, great shots.
    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out.” ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

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    I don't really know how well the kenko tubes would work with zoom lenses, but coupled to your 100mm macro lens, one of the three tubes should get you close enough to photograph the eyes of a fly. The only problem is getting daylight to reach to the fly between the lens and the eye But not a problem if you use a ring flash. Also, you could always get that close and still have enough light using bright daylight, or even a mirror or reflector pointed at the subject. I have seen some photos taken by the use of a LED flashlight.

    The 200mm f/2.8L has a distance button I can move to take close-up photos under 3 meters, but the 12mm Kenko allows me to get a little closer, perhaps 6 to 8 feet? To increase the depth-of-field I had to shoot with the lens aperture to at least f/8 to show the whole flower in focus.

    Do you have a 50mm f/1.4 or f/1.8? If that's the case, the kenko tubes work for certain.
    ---------
    I noticed you "Pica" photo at the Canon photography forum we frequent. It's a real nice and cute photo, specially because it's extremely rare to capture such an animal with a bunch of weeds in its mouth like a flower arrangement. When there, visit the "Macro" forum, and look through the pages until you find "Lord V" macro photos. You will be amazed. He uses a Canon MPE65, and a Sigma 105mm macro, but the 100mm macro is the most favorite.

    Lots of people use the 100mm macro for portraits. It's incredibly sharp, but you can always soften the photo with software if that's what you like. One of these days I plan to buy either the 100mm macro, or the twice as expensive 135mm f/2L prime. I will have to seriously think about which one of these two.

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    Decided to add three more now that I could take a few pictures in my backyard without getting drenched by the recent rains. It's Saturday, and the sun is barely peeking through the clouds, but I took these photos under a pretty dark cloud cover.




    Used a Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L and a 12mm Kenko tube.

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    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Well done Ray, the second set of images, taken under 'cloud cover', ?? The difference is quite noticeable indeed. The colors are much more saturated !

    The first set of photos are expertly done in my opinion, but the second set is what really caught my attention.

    The colors and contrast are outstanding examples of why dark cloud cover will yield much better results !!

    Keep up the great work and post more !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Majik Imaje View Post
    Well done Ray, the second set of images, taken under 'cloud cover', ?? The difference is quite noticeable indeed. The colors are much more saturated !

    The first set of photos are expertly done in my opinion, but the second set is what really caught my attention.

    The colors and contrast are outstanding examples of why dark cloud cover will yield much better results !!

    Keep up the great work and post more !!
    Thanks.

    You are correct about the cloud cover on the second set of photos. It has been mostly cloudy lately. I have gotten good results when taking photos of flowers and vegetation on cloudy days, or with subjects in the shade without the use of a flash. It seems that the absence of sunlight keeps the harsh highlights from overpowering the rest of the subject, and allows for more of the details and colors to be shown. But sometimes I get careless and use too slow shutter speeds

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    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    The absolute worst time of the day (sunny skies) to create a photograph is @ noon. The sun is directly overhead and the shadows are flat.

    The best weather for saturated color(s) is on a cloudy overcast day, Just before it rains and just after the rain stops.

    Those are not my words, but words you can find along with stunning photographs, in the OLD Time / Life SERIES on Photography.

    I am quoting (from memory) what I learned from that one volume on COLOR 35 years ago.

    Take the time to read these simple basics and do some of the 'tests' they provide for you to develop your eyes. I am sure the results will be stunning indeed, as you have protrayed here in your second set of images !!

    Look at a stop sign on a sunny day, now notice that same stop sign on a cloudy day.. two completly different colors !!

    When you learn how to compose a photograph using colors in Juxtaposition with each other, will produce the most eye -popping results

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    Quote Originally Posted by Majik Imaje View Post
    The absolute worst time of the day (sunny skies) to create a photograph is @ noon. The sun is directly overhead and the shadows are flat.

    The best weather for saturated color(s) is on a cloudy overcast day, Just before it rains and just after the rain stops.

    Those are not my words, but words you can find along with stunning photographs, in the OLD Time / Life SERIES on Photography.

    I am quoting (from memory) what I learned from that one volume on COLOR 35 years ago.

    Take the time to read these simple basics and do some of the 'tests' they provide for you to develop your eyes. I am sure the results will be stunning indeed, as you have protrayed here in your second set of images !!

    Look at a stop sign on a sunny day, now notice that same stop sign on a cloudy day.. two completly different colors !!

    When you learn how to compose a photograph using colors in Juxtaposition with each other, will produce the most eye -popping results
    Well, thanks a lot for the tips. It's something I have to keep in mind from now on when taking photos of foliage, flowers, etc. I do know that my landscape photos look much better in the morning, and late afternoon light. The golden light makes for very nice images.

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    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Yellow is warm.. blue/ cyan are cold (colors) !!! they can be used in selective areas to enchance your photographs !!

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