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Thread: Will bigger tires cause rollovers on sidehills?

  1. #1

    Default Will bigger tires cause rollovers on sidehills?

    I was all set to buy new 27 inch tires and some nice alloy rims for my 2005 king quad, then I spoke to a suzuki dealer back home in Oregon and he did not recommend it due to higher rollover rate on side hills. Has anyone else had this experience?
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  2. #2
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    Default

    Anytime you raise your center of gravity you can increase the potential of a roll over. Going to 27's over your stock 25's will raise your vehicle one inch over the factory height. But you are also probably going to a wider tire so the quad may be even more stable than the factory tires.
    There is always a trade off with going to a larger tire cause it effects your gearing ratio as well.
    Usually the advantages of a larger mud tire is worth the expense because of the vastly improved traction. I certaintly would not go larger than 27's as the larger the tire the more potential there is to hurt the driveline, axles, etc.
    26 or 27's for the rear that are 12 inches wide and the same for the fronts in either 9 or 10 wides should be perfect for that machine. My KQ's have 26-12 on the rears and 9 wides on the front. My AC has 27's on it with 10 wides for the front.

  3. #3
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up stability

    If you want to compensate for larger tires, you could put wheel spacers on which would widen your stance. The wider the stance, the more stable on the side hill. There are some minor problems with the wider stance though like fitting through small spaces (like between trees) and the steering can be a bit harder. I recently put 2" wider tires and 1 1/2" wide spacers on the front of my bike (5" gain overall). It is a little more difficult to steer, but the traction that I gained is well worth it.
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  4. #4

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    Also, if you buy offset rims it will widen your stance by two inches. Those two inches will make up for the higher center of gravity.

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    A few years ago I went with 27's on stock wheels and 1.5 inch wheel spacers. I have since sold the spacers and stock wheels and have c-series offset wheels. A much better setup. Get the 27's with some nice offset rims and don't look back. You will LOVE it. I think it will be safer because you will have better traction and you will not be raising the center of gravity any noticeable difference, you will have a wider stance for added stability and better ground clearance.

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    I had 27' Mudlites on my Honda for the last 2 years and the reason I sold them is because it was so tippy on sidehilling. I had them on the original rims and it was much more top heavy than with the stock tires. I replaced the 27's with stock size (25's) MudLite XL's. Seems to handle much better in the mountains on the steeper stuff and still does great in the mud...

  7. #7

    Thumbs up Offset rims

    OK thanks for the insight everyone. You have influenced my purchase. I will probably get 27" tires but I will buy the offset rims or spacers. I am not going to buy the 27" tires unless I get either spacers or offset rims. If I don't get offset rims or spacers I will stick with smaller mudlites. Appreciate it.
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  8. #8
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I watched a Griz roll 2 times in one day with 27" mudlites on it. They grab hard on some terrain and you have to watch the handling to keep it on its wheels. The first time was a small side hill and too much speed. The tires grabbed hard and the rider could not hold the bars. The second was hard braking for an obstacle. The tires grabbed hard to the right side of the trail and he could not hold it. I contribute some of this to rider strength but mostly to the tires. They also handle a but erratically when hard braking. As usual, if you use them for what they are intended you should have no problems. Seeing a young rider on a big bore with oversize tires makes my hair rise now.

  9. #9

    Default Grizz Stability

    You have to keep in mind, the Grizzly is one of the last big bores with the high gas tank between your legs. Most manufacturer's have relocated the gas tank undernieth the rear fenders for a lower center of gravity. With wider aftermarket tires and offset rims the stability is dramatically increased.

    In the previous cases I would suspect the rolls overs due to the rider not nescessarily the tires. I have rode with just about every machine with most tires available on the market. If you know how to drive it and stay within your limits the changes of a roll over or accident are severly reduced. I was not there but that is just my suspicion.

    In my opinion aggressive aftermarket tires are a nescisity in Alaska.

  10. #10
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default I agree.....well to a point.

    Since there are so many different areas to ride it is hard to say that Alaska requires oversize tires etc. I won't say that the tires caused the rollovers. I will sat that their agressive lugs grabbed harder than stock tires and that they at least contributed to the accidents. When they grab, they jerk the bars out of a smaller rider and go full turn. This Griz has the aftermarket rims that act like spacers. All a person needs to do is remember that it "can" effect the handling of their machine. I don't sidehill unless absolutely necessary. My group passed a group of wheelers near the beaver ponds at Knik that could not get up the ice ledge on the little creek. All of them had big bores with oversize tires. They saw us waiting and backed off so we could make a try. My stock tires hopped up the second attempt and my boys Honda made it first attempt. You should have seen their faces. Every wheeler has its day.

  11. #11

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    With more agressive aftermarket tires you need to become ascustomed to the completely different handling effects that will be associated with these tires. A inexperienced rider will have problems with handle bars being ripped from their hands if they do not know how the tires will perform and they do not know what to expect from their knew purhcase. It takes times, if I slapped on 35" mud tires on my Chevy I would not expect it to perform the same and I would know that it would take time to be accustomed to the different manuevurability of the new tires.

    The newer KQ's have thee lightest steering I have ever experienced. Even with stock tires the handlebars can be ripped out of your hands similiar to a loosely hooked King salmon on the river. BUT out of the dozen KQ riders I know they fair very well with their aftermarket tires. It takes time to become acustomed to the change in "grip."

    Stock tires have more biting edges compared to aftermarket "all around" tires. Also momentum is a HUGE factor when climbing ice hills. Jim Creek is my home play ground and I have been through it all in the winter and summer. With stock tires the tread is more tightly packed together which will give you more bitting edges. On ice these bitting edges make all the difference. I know a guy with a grizz and he studded his 589's, no one can touch him on the steep ice covered climbs of Knik. Aftermarket tires are designed to handle trails, mud, snow, ice, dirt, sand, gravel, and just about any other terrain out there. I know, I have used most of them. These tires will not shine in one particular aspect but will perform good in all terrain.

    The rider makes the machine no the other way around.

    Observe this picture. I own an 05 750 Brute Force with 28" bugs, a lift kit, lift springs, and I always carry a heavy load which consists of extra gas on the racks and a bag full of required tools and other nescessities. Usually, in my group, I am in front of the pack testing the terrain. Even with my mods I am no stranger to side hilling, steeps climbs (in the winter or summer), deep snow, long stretches of speed, and bottomless mud. It is all about the rider.

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