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Thread: Model 700 LSS .280 woes

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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Default Model 700 LSS .280 woes

    I have been messing about with my new modell 700 LSS in .280, and first 2-3 shots are always good, then it starts shooting all over the target.
    I'm shooting 160 gr, Fed Premium Nosler AcuBonds.
    Checking it over, the barrel is touching right over the raised rib where the front post is mounted. Could it be as easy as the barrel heating up and throwing my shots? I had my Tikka 7mmRM right there to compare, and it is spot on as per usual.
    I was going to sand the section down to allow a dollar bill to be passed under the barrel.
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    I have been messing about with my new modell 700 LSS in .280, and first 2-3 shots are always good, then it starts shooting all over the target.
    I'm shooting 160 gr, Fed Premium Nosler AcuBonds.
    Checking it over, the barrel is touching right over the raised rib where the front post is mounted. Could it be as easy as the barrel heating up and throwing my shots? I had my Tikka 7mmRM right there to compare, and it is spot on as per usual.
    I was going to sand the section down to allow a dollar bill to be passed under the barrel.
    Thanks

    Yes, make sure you seal the spot you sanded and put a good coat of finish back on the spot.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Make sure the scope base screws are tight and Locktited.

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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Thanks gents
    Do the laminated stocks need re-varnishing? Thought they were "impregnated" with various epoxies etc.

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    So i had it apart, and there is (was) a bump in the stock right over where the front sling post comes in. Probably protruded a good 1/8" of an inch or so. Had to take it all down in order not to have the barrel hitting it. No wonder it was shooting wild You would think that this sort of thing would be taken care of at the factory.

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    That bump is supposed to be there. It is called a pressure point. Most factory rifles come with this to help tame some of the whip out of the thin barrels used on sporters. Some rifles will shoot better with this "bump" removed, some wont. Curious to see what yours does, but my general rule is: if it is a thin lightweight barrel, I dont remove the pressure point. If the barrel has some meat on it, then I will go ahead and remove the pressure point, but also bed the action. This is all dependent on how the rifle shoots. If it shoots good, I dont mess with it. Let us know how it does.

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    Member Yukoner's Avatar
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    Thanks for that info Tom.
    We'll see how it does tomorrow morning. Had to try something, because like i mentioned, it was all over the map after a couple of rounds were through it.
    Theoretically though, wouldn't a pressure point like this cause the barrell to move once it heated up?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    Thanks for that info Tom.
    We'll see how it does tomorrow morning. Had to try something, because like i mentioned, it was all over the map after a couple of rounds were through it.
    Theoretically though, wouldn't a pressure point like this cause the barrell to move once it heated up?

    The easy way to tell if you need up pressure at that point, is to buy a pack of cigarette papers to be used for shim stock. This can be measured after you determine the amount of pressure and the effect. You can come back and use bedding compound, to build up the same point. Why I don't like any of these methods, the stock wood still changes and you can't stop it. Unless the stock is worth sending out and getting it impregnated. The guys I know that do this kind of process charge by weight. Before and after.

    I have cut all the forearm grain to stop all movement, sealed with fiber glass. I still got lateral movement. I went so far as cutting a channel. Still no joy. If you have wood that likes to move around the only solution I know that is a permanent fix is impregnation. When I was doing all these different things to make it work, my mind kept up a consistent chant of fiberglass stock.

    The only time I have found that up pressure was needed on light weight rapid taper barrels was in wood stocks. I have never had to do this in fiberglass stocks. I've heard that it does needed to be done sometimes.

    When i was at McMillan stocks, I asked the manager about this and his reply was, WHAT?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    The LSS has a resin impregnated laminated wood stock, so it should be relatively stable.
    I checked my Tikka, and it is free floating the entire length of the barrel, and it stays accurate for as many rounds as i care to put through it. Same with my Husqvarna .308. I'm guessing removing the pressure point will have no negative effect on the rifle.
    Thanks again for the input gents.

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