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Thread: Advice for another new hunter

  1. #1
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    Default Advice for another new hunter

    I am looking to go out for caribou or moose this fall. What are the most accessible areas if you dont have a 4 wheeler, boat or aircraft? I am in good shape so a long hike is no problem. I have watched many field dressing videos but am still concerned about screwing it up. Any advice? Thanks

  2. #2

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    Find someone with experience and figure out a way to go with them.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by aknater View Post
    Find someone with experience and figure out a way to go with them.
    Amen!!!!!
    And if you haven't already done so, watch F&Gs video "Is this moose legal" about a hundred times along with their moose field dressing video. which I believe is titled "Field care of big game meat". It's well worth the time.
    I'll be rewatching my copies soon.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Educate yourself - as it sounds like you have done, then find a mentor - the way it has been done since time immorial...and is still done since a better way has not yet been devised.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    When it comes to moose, watch what you get yourself into as far as "long hikes" are concerned. I'm primarily a backpack hunter and love getting far off the beaten path with my own two legs as my engine, but I would be very reluctant to shoot a moose while hunting solo more than a couple of miles from the road or atv. With a mature bull moose, you're looking at 6-8 packpack loads of 100-150 pounds each to get the animal out of the woods. Besides the sheer physical exhaustion involved, keeping the meat from spoiling or scavengers while taking so long to remove it from the field can be difficult. I've packed caribou long distances (if you're in good shape you can get a boned out caribou packed in 2 loads), but wouldn't try it with a moose unless I had 2-3 friends along. Beyond finding someone with experience, start small and work your way up as you gain your own experience. Fall black bears might be a better place to start than moose, and berry fed bears have meat that is every bit as good.

  6. #6
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    jgunder:

    BUY BEEF:

    I urge you not to join a bunch of bloodthirsty killers, and rapers of Alaska, and become one of those despicable “Hunters”.

    Let someone else do your killin for you, that’s natures way.

    Anonymous of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  7. #7
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    Default Become a Sherpa

    I am sure it is not what you want to hear, but finding a mentor is great advice. When I first moved up, I offered to tag along with several acquaintances and not hunt but help them pack meat. No one ever turned me down. I went on moose, caribou, and sheep hunts that first year and never had to pay for a non-res tag. It was an amazing learning experience and really every bit as satisfying as if I had pulled the trigger myself.

    As far as field dressing, until you get comfortable with it, just remember the basics. You want to keep the guts intact (especially the digestive tract) and remove them from the animal. Obviously, this is most easily accomplished with a SHALLOW cut to the belly. Before cutting into/cutting off any organ, take a moment and think about where it will spill its contents. If you get the guts seperated from the carcass without spilling anything, you have nearly won the battle. There are a number of ways to go from this point and all have advantages. You can't screw up too bad at this point, but what you do may not be ideal. If in doubt, get the meat off the animal and let the butcher sort it out. A lot of books/videos focus too much on perfectly preserving every cut of meat, but that is not necessary for a beginner, especially if you want a lot of burger, snack sticks, sausage, etc. As long as you don't contaminate anything while gutting, you can't screw up TOO bad.

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