Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: What is the "SHEEP" Sleeping bag to own?

  1. #1

    Default What is the "SHEEP" Sleeping bag to own?

    I've been gearing up for awhile now for sheep hunting, and will most likely make my first hunt next summer. I've tried to buy the best that I can and many items have been selected based on reviews here on this site, including: Barney's Frame/Pack, Lowa Boots, Warmlite Tent, and Swarovski Bino's. This brings me to one of the last items I'm searching for. What is THE sleeping bag preferred by veteran sheep hunters? I own a couple of Marmot's (down), Mountain Hardwear, and a Wiggys Hunter. I've used down bags for a long time and have never had any issues, but it sounds like almost everybody is going for the synthetics for sheep due to the wet down issue on the mountains during that timeframe. I've looked at Wiggy's, Integral Designs, Mtn. HW, NorthFace, Marmot, Stephenson Triple Bags....etc. I know this has been discussed before, but I thought somebody might have something they'd personally recommend and some reasons. I appreciate the help and information anybody can shed on this topic.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I went with NF Cats Meow for me and a Marmot Womens Trestle 15 for the wife. The trestle is a little heavy at 3.5 lbs but I carry the majority of the gear so a pound will not hurt her untill I can get her a better bag and pass this one on to the kids. As far as THE bag I think you need to get in them to figure that out! The cut and the features are very important as is the pack size and the weight will make it a choice specific to you. I want to like the Big agnes bags but I can't get past their weight despite not having any fill in the back...They sould have a very lite package in the 20* range and the ones they offer are just middle of the road... The Wiggys mountain bag and the NF Cats Meow seem to be the go too tents for most people.

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,416

    Default

    Lots of good bags on the market. I too have a TNF Cat's Meow. To me, for a synthetic it seems to be a good compromise between weight, warmth and cost. There are other also I'm sure. (I keep eyeing up the Big Agnes bags) At some point it just comes down to personal preference and how good of deal you come across.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    376

    Default Marmot

    I don't think you can beat the Marmot Helium for weight or compactness. As with any sleeping bag take precautions to make sure it doesn't get wet. I carry mine in plastic bag inside the stuff sack, then inside a dry bag. When I leave the tent I leave it in a large garbage bag just in case it water gets in the tent. If it rains a lot make sure your tent is well vented so you don't get condensation in the tent. The Helium is good to 15 degrees and this is plenty for most early season sheep hunts.

  5. #5

    Default

    Funny , I have TNF Cats Meow and have used it for 4 years of sheep hunting and it has worked very well, even when tested under some real wet conditions, me being wet and teh bag being wet. (thats a long story). I also have the Marmot Helium (down) and intended to use it this year for sheep hunting but looking outside right now and all the flood warnings across the interior I am not gonna lie, TNF Cats Meow is sounding a whole bunch better. I will decide when its time to pack when this front is gone and or if the sun ever comes out again.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    What about the Mountain Hardwear Lamina 0 degree bag?
    It is synthetic and weighs 4 lbs. Is that too heavy or too warm for sheep or hunting in Alaska in Sept/Oct?

  7. #7

    Default Great Info.

    Thanks for the information guys, this is the kind of stuff I'm searching for. I forgot about that I have a Big Agnes that I use in the summer. I really like it, especially the pocket for the Therm-a-rest. It looks like Campmor has a sale on the NF Cat's Meow for $129.97 at the moment, which seems like a good deal too. I'll run around Fairbanks and test some bags out today to see what else is around. I've never used an Integral Designs so I'll see what their all about as well.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Spencer View Post
    What about the Mountain Hardwear Lamina 0 degree bag?
    It is synthetic and weighs 4 lbs. Is that too heavy or too warm for sheep or hunting in Alaska in Sept/Oct?
    I don't consider 4 lbs to be to heavy for sheep hunting but a lot of others do. FOr me the 2 most important pieces of gear you can carry are your shelter and your sleeping bag and a good synthetic bag can save your butt when things go south. A 0 degree bag is about perfect for that time of year but might be a tad warm for August, depends on the year. I use a Wiggy's Ultralight 20 degree bag for all my hunts and weighs about 3 1/2 lbs. I don't do much camping in the winter so this bag is perfect for me.

  9. #9
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    My backpacking bag is a Marmot Pinnacle 15 deg. bag weighing 2.5 lbs. Its down but has a water resistant shell, so if you have a leaky tent, or get some moisture on it, the bag still stays warm and dry.

    Scott, I have a Marmot Col EQ -20 deg bag that I had out on a Kenai Mtn. caribou hunt last October. Camped in the snow with one night down to 20 degrees. The bag was great in those conditions, you didn't have to worry about wearing all your warm clothes to bed.

    The 0 degree bag will be fine if you don't mind a little extra weight or hate sleeping in all your hunting gear on cold nights. Think about what other trips you'll be using it for as well.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    Scott, I have a Marmot Col EQ -20 deg bag that I had out on a Kenai Mtn. caribou hunt last October. Camped in the snow with one night down to 20 degrees. The bag was great in those conditions, you didn't have to worry about wearing all your warm clothes to bed.

    The 0 degree bag will be fine if you don't mind a little extra weight or hate sleeping in all your hunting gear on cold nights. Think about what other trips you'll be using it for as well.
    Thank you for the reply! I believe that I would rather have to strip down to nothing to stay cool rather than have to pile on my hunting clothes to get warm. I found the MH Lamina for $149.95 at Campmor and I think that is a good price. I will also check out the Marmot Col EQ -20 bag as well.

  11. #11
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Cabelas...

    I was looking for something lighter, and more compact to pack, for my float trips. I found a Cabelas Boudary Waters bag. The long 0 degree weighs 3 lbs and packs to the size of a soccer ball. It comes with its own compression dry bag. Nice dry bag. Works really well. These bags are very warm and pack down extremely small. Below is a link. Comes in rectangle or mummy style.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...ters&noImage=0
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  12. #12

    Default El Cheapo:D

    While this isn't by any means the best sleeping bag out there it fits the bill perfectly for me. It weighs in a 3.1# stuffs to 7X12" and can be compressed to a 7X7" ball with the compression sack provided. The big selling point for me was the fact its rated to 0 degrees just over 3 pounds and got two for 120 bucks including shipping. I used mine first on a snowshoeing trip the first part of May this year. It got down to less than 20 degrees at night and I never came close to being cold. I suspect it will only be warmer when its zipped up with the wifes matching bag, but we've only done that when the low was about 30 degrees so not a real test. Anyways worth a look for those on a budget.

    http://stores.ebay.com/Blues-SLEEPIN...ING_W0QQfsubZ9

    IF you contact the seller they'll cut you a much better deal if you don't go through ebay/paypal and buy directly with a credit card and will also ship USPS to AK.

  13. #13

    Default The North Face Superlight

    I have used The North Face Superlight long for over 10 years. Has served me great. It is down filled and weighs in at 3lbs 9 oz. and is rated for 0-15 degrees.

    I use a Design Salt mummy liner inside which makes a sleeping bag warmer, keeps it clean, and also makes it easier to turn and move inside a sleeping bag. Highly recommend you purchase a liner no matter what type of sleeping bag you buy.

  14. #14

    Default ID

    ID is the one for me for wetter seasons like this year. I have been looking at a down Moonstone bag for drier weather and interior late season hunts. I used to have a moonstone down bag that I found in the ditch outside of our place in Kenny Lake. I thought god delivered straight to me. I used and abused it for many years and liked it a lot.
    Right now I am still running my ID Rennaisance 20f bag. I would get a North Twin 10F broad if I could do it again this would extend use to wet winter goat hunts. The selling points of the Integral Designs bag is that I like the Pertex shell and the Primaloft insulation is warm even when wet. It is a warm bag and it compressed to the size of a cantalope.
    I have heard much from the Wiggy's and believe that they are a good bag but.... I really like those ID synthetics and I believe I would go with a moonstone, FF or a Western Mountaineering if I wanted a microshell down bag.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  15. #15

    Default

    AKHunter45, about what size does that wiggy's ultralight compress down to? Thanks, Ken

  16. #16

    Default

    Y'all are going to think I'm insane on this but I use the military sleep system. I usually don't use all three bags at the same time until it gets late season but I just can't sleep if I am cold or wet and this bag is the bomb for keeping me warm at night in cold windy conditions. The trade off? This is by far the heaviest bag you could carry. All three bags put together will cost you about 9 pounds. Most of the time I get away with using the patrol bag. Below is a link to a site that describes it if you don't know what I am referring to.

    http://www.imsplus.com/ims61b.html
    Loving God, Loving People, Loving America--Serving All Three

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Engel View Post
    AKHunter45, about what size does that wiggy's ultralight compress down to? Thanks, Ken
    With the compression bag that i'm using it is about the size of a 1 1/2 footballs. It will fit in the bottom of my Osprey Aether 70 quite easily though I generally carry it on the outside if it isn't raining.

  18. #18
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    The lightest warmest one you can afford.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  19. #19
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Default

    When something starts selling at Campmor, it's not a good thing... You're about to see alot of Slumberjack bags there

    The "Lamina" was first released with continuous filament that ran the length of the bag. Huge error. They scrapped that idea and later went to chopped, staple fiber, which can't be laminated because of it's properties or lack of integrity. LL Bean picked up the bag, then dumped it almost immediately because they got alot of them back.

    If you've seen the inside of one of these bags... Well, it's pretty pathetic. They run a few glue lines around the radial of the bag and expect the insulation to adhere to it. Not going to happen. Continued use, and/or washing causes separation and de-lamination of the insulation.

    "Lamina" does not equal Lamilite.

    That's your sleeping bag lesson for the day.

    The Wiggy's-Alaska Glacier Hunter or Mountain Hunter are both good sellers among sheep and goat hunters and I have never heard anything but raves from their users.

    Taylor

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •