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Thread: How To Anchor In Remote Beach Location

  1. #1

    Default How To Anchor In Remote Beach Location

    Hey Guys,
    I've got a lot of boating experience but am a newbee to the salt here and the big tides. What is the best method to go ashore and keep you're boat safe at remote beach locations without having to keep someone on the boat or have a zodiac to ferry back and forth? I've heard something about a system that allows you to anchor offshore but still be able to beach the boat and have a line to it when it's time to go. Anyone familiar with this and how it works?
    Emo

  2. #2

    Default Simple

    I've used this with succes for my 23' river boat. Cheap and easy to build. Set it up in the daylight the first time though...

    http://www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

  3. #3
    Member SkinnyRaven's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by emo View Post
    Hey Guys,
    I've got a lot of boating experience but am a newbee to the salt here and the big tides. What is the best method to go ashore and keep you're boat safe at remote beach locations without having to keep someone on the boat or have a zodiac to ferry back and forth? I've heard something about a system that allows you to anchor offshore but still be able to beach the boat and have a line to it when it's time to go. Anyone familiar with this and how it works?
    Emo
    Check this out.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ight=anchoring

    07 Ocean Pro 220 ET HT
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  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    In protected waters I use what I've heard called an aleut anchor. I have 100' of line and a 10# mushroom anchor. Tie the line to the bow of the boat, figure depth of anchor, tie anchor at that point. After you get everyone on shore, put the mushroom anchor on deck, hold the end of the line, push the boat into deeper water then give the line a tug to pull the anchor off the deck and drop it. Tie the line to shore.

    Areas with big tides and shores that are quite shallow will need a longer rope.

    When you're ready to get back in the boat just pull it in. The mushroom anchor drags up fairly easily. I've heard of other folks using downrigger sinkers.

  5. #5
    Member MyKC395's Avatar
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    Default Anchor Buddy

    Depending on the size (weight) of your boat, I have found the Anchor Buddy to be a great tool for setting up in protected waters. Check the attached link out to see if it would work for you. I have two of them and just connect them to give a little more distance from shore when in shallow water bays.

    http://www.anchorbuddy.com/index.html



    Photo of my boat at Paulson Bay

  6. #6
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default I tag line mine

    My extra anchor is one size larger then normally required for anchoring. I have a 50 foot bridle attached to the anchor with a pulley. I also have a tree(or rock bridle) bridle with pulley made up for shore side. I drop/set the anchor with bridle(at about 60 to 75 feet of water) and ferry line attached I move to shore. At the the shore I unload and take my tree bridle and find a good spot to anchor to the shore. Attach my bouy ball, boat and pull the boat almost all the way out to the anchor. You obivously do not want the line running straight up from anchor to boat bow. I tie a loop in the line for a place to hold the rope from running back out.

    If you are running an O/B or an I/O you may have to trim up so the boat can swing 360* if you use a floating line. I use this with my 21' North River and with my 28' Bayliner. The tag line attached to shore will reduce the possiblity of dragging anchor very far. Dropping it in deeper water also allows the anchor to rehook before the boat gets to shore, but on a good note I have never had my anchor drag. The reason I believe is because of you are pulling against both the shore and anchor lines. Now a straight down your throat blow is the reason I drop the larger anchor.


    My 2 cents....the 1st mistake in anchoring is an inadequate anchor. If the anchor you are using is made for an 18 to 21 foot boat and you have a 21 foot boat you should consider moving up one size larger. The sizing rarely takes into account wind or current. Last but not least, your life may some day depend on your anchor set.

    Here is a chart that you can use as a general guide

    BOAT SIZE ANCHOR WEIGHT
    Length(ft)///Weight(lbs)///Bruce(lbs)///Danforth*(lbs)/// Fortress(lbs)/// Plow(lbs)/// Yachtsman(lbs)

    20-25 --------2,500----------- 4.4--------- 8-S 5-H** ------------4--------------- 10 --------------15
    26-30 --------5,000 -----------11--------- 13-S, 12-H------------ 7--------------- 15-------------- 25
    31-35 --------10,000-------- 11/16.5----- 22-S, 12-H 7--------- 10-------------- 20 -------------35-40
    36-40 --------15,000 ---------16.5-------- 22-S, 20-H -----------10------------- -25-------------- 50


    Anchor Rode Guide

    BOAT SIZE ANCHOR RODE
    Length (ft)/// Weight (lbs)// Chain (dia.-inch)// Nylon (dia.-inch)//Length (ft)

    20-25 ----------2,500------------ 3/16 -------------7/16 ---------------90
    26-30 ----------5,000 ------------1/4-------------- 7/16 ---------------135
    31-35 ----------10,000 ----------5/16 -------------1/2 -----------------190
    36-40 ---------15,000 -----------3/8 --------------9/16 ----------------225

    ****Note****

    The reccomended anchor size also requires the use of the proper length of chain. Less chain bigger anchor.

    On my Bayliner I run 16.5 Bruce on 5/16" chain with 1/2" rope. I do not however have the 190 feet of chain. I actually run about 20 feet of chain with over 600 feet of rope.

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    One can also make their anchor more effective by adding a good length of chain to it. On my 16# bruce copy I put 30' of 1/4" chain. The chain adds about 14 #'s, but more importantly keeps the pull parralel to the ocean bottom.

  8. #8

    Default

    Here is another description for setting up a running line for your boat. Prepare a Polyform buoy with a circular loop of rope through the eye. I use a grapevine knot to tie the loop. I use two shackles connected to this loop, one on each side of the knot, one for the anchor rode and the second for a pulley which you run your running line from shore through. I put the boat on the beach, tie two sections of 300' 3-stranded nylon rope to something secure on shore (tree or log), back off the beach perpendicular, feeding out the full 300' of shore line. Before you get to the end of the 300' feet, put the line through the pulley and tie the two ends together. Drop buoy in water and go set anchor in line with line you just set from shore. Get the anchore set and back down to the buoy. Tie the anchor rode to the other shackle on the buoy. The left over anchor rode I stuff in a mesh bag and suspend 5-10' below the buoy. Run the boat back to the beach. Tie the bow painter of the boat to the knot on the running line at the beach. Pull the appropriate side of the running line to pull the boat off the beach back out to the buoy until the knot is at the pulley on the bouy. You will need to keep track of which side of the pulley the running line knot is on when retrieving the boat. Things to note. I use sinking line for the running line to avoid other boats choppinig my running line. This setup will only work on beaches with a steep enough slope to get you to deep enough water within 300' of shore Your boat will not swing with other boats in the anchorage that are using a conventional anchoring setup.

  9. #9

    Default Thanks Guys

    Great info. Can't wait to get out there and give some of these techniques a try. Very apprehensive about leaving the new toy out there on her own.
    Emo
    Anchor River Lodge

  10. #10
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Default

    I know most times we will be using these techniques in protected waters, but one does need to ensure that the boat will swing nose into any possible weather/wave/blow that may come thru. Especially if you are going to be away from the boat more then a couple of hours. Waves as well as a good wind(especially a boat with a top) can roll a boat over enough to take on water even in protected waters.

    I have been out on PWS and have seen winds in excess of 100 mph. The good thing was we were in a good protected bay from the waves never seen much more then a ripple on the water but the wind beat us to near death for 2 days. A couple of times the wind change direction and it felt like we were going to get knocked over till the nose came around to face it.

    Hard afternoon blows are especially possible if any place close to any of the bigger glaciers.

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