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Thread: Neck sizing???

  1. #1
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    Default Neck sizing???

    Tried neck sizing with a FL sizing die for the first time and have a few ?s. The gun in question is a 204 Ruger M77 MKII Ultra light with about 200 rounds through it. I'm loading a mid-range load of Benchmark with 35 gr Bergers well off the lands.

    I backed my die of the base of my shell holder about 1/16 of and inch and sized a few pcs of fired brass. than I backed the die out to 1/4" off the shell holder and did 3 more. After trimming to length I loaded them with bullets only and tried them in my gun. The rounds chambered with just the slightest amount of fliction. The 3 least sized??? gave just a little bit more resistance than the first 2. Is this normal or do I need to bump the shoulder back a bit? The cases where polished prior to sizing and had very faint marks on the side's running the full length of them all the way around. Rough chamber? It is a fairly new rifle with less than 200 rounds down the pipe. It was doing this from the start (scratches) with new and fully resized cases but it went away after about 100 rounds.

    Any help would be much appreciated,
    Thanks, Jake

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Honestly I've never seen any accuracy advantage in partial sizing cases, which is what you are doing with an fl die when you back it off. I like casees that load smoothly each and every firing vs. ones that get pregressively harder to chamber to the point you need to fl size them anyhow. To me it just becomes an extra pain. Keep it simple, fl size, find a load the gun likes, and load up a pile of them.

    The scratches in the case are typically from the feed rail in the magazine, not the chamber.

  3. #3
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    You are doing it properly. The resistance is the unsized case going into the chamber of the same size and shape. J.

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    I am a neck sizer, tens of thousands of rounds every year. I am thoroughly convinced that it is always easier on the brass and generally makes for a more accurate load. In the small case where accuracy is the game anyway it would be most recommended. BUT...you need to size the neck length and the dies are pretty precise with 14 threads per inch one turn is about .070". That is the most you will need to back off the die. So run the die down until it touches the shell holder then back off at least 1/2 turn and no more than one turn. Every chamber is different and every die is different but the f/l die is designed to return the case to minimum SAAMI dimensions in every dimension but the one we are concerned about is the headspace dimension. Case head to shoulder datum point should be allowed to stay as it was when ejected from the rifle. Otherwise it will be fireformed anew with each firing and will stretch that little bit each time it is fired after it is f/l resized and the shoulder is pushed back. If you have a chamber that is minimal then this will have less benefit but if your chamber is quite liberal in dimension it will benefit a great deal. Thats why the .035" to .070" dimensions headspace is controlled to within .006" for most ( the GO and NO GO gage is .006" apart) and worst case is .010" so the .035" will clear any varying headspace.

    When we want to get precise we use dies made to match the chamber of the rifle and just size the neck only (neck sizer die) the correct amount and when we need to bump the shoulder back for easy chambering we use a shell holder that is longer by .002". Match winners use this technique with various makers dies. I like to use this for everything because it saves the brass and is better accuracy with just about every caliber.
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  5. #5
    Member chrisWillh's Avatar
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    I'm just starting reloading myself and was curious about neck sizing. I have the RCBS 2 die set for the caliber I want to reload but was wondering if it would be worth it to also get the neck sizing die or just attempt neck sizing with the full length die.
    Chris Willhoite

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    Default Reloading,

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisWillh View Post
    I'm just starting reloading myself and was curious about neck sizing. I have the RCBS 2 die set for the caliber I want to reload but was wondering if it would be worth it to also get the neck sizing die or just attempt neck sizing with the full length die.

    What I did is start reloading full length only for about my first 10 reloads. that was using 100 pcs of 1x fired factory brass. After I wore that brass out with working up loads and just getting used to what I was doing.... I started playing around with neck sizing my second lot of brass. that was ofcourse after I had FL sized them and fire formed them in my rifle.
    Have you purchased atleast 2 good reloading manuals? If not, you should! And then ofcourse read them front to back. I bought the new Hornady book and then the new Nosler manual. The Nosler manual kind of made sense of a few things I was confused on after reading the Hornady book. If I would have read the Nosler first the hornady would have answered the same questions for me. Both books are very good, But I really liked the way the Nosler manual outlined the steps in a 1, 2, 3 type format. Also I would try and find a mentor for maybe a 2 or 3 hour lesson.
    And lastly try 35 gr Berger's with Benchmark powder and CCI BR4's

    Jake

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    Member chrisWillh's Avatar
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    So far I only have the Speer #14 book that came with my press kit and all of my brass is factory that's been fired once. I haven't done anything except go over everything that came with my kit and zero in my scales and caliper. I'm wanting to learn as much as I can before I start.
    Chris Willhoite

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