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Thread: M98 STANDARD LENGTH ACTIONS compared dimensionally

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default M98 STANDARD LENGTH ACTIONS compared dimensionally

    Note: This information was copied from another forum which in turn was copied from another and so forth.
    Here is the link to the other forum where I happened upon the information: http://www.accuratereloading.com/

    Quote: M98 STANDARD LENGTH ACTIONS

    I am going to group different actions by length, ring diameter, and barrel shank diameter. The first group will be Type I, these are the "most standard" Mausers. Probably 75% or more of all Mausers produced after 1898 will fall into this category. I am not going to list every model, that would take a book of it's own, but if your particular model is not listed, comparing the dimensions will place it into the correct category. So here are the dimensions for

    Type I:
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410 large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    Some of the models that fall into Type I are:
    Chilean M1912, Steyr
    GEW 98, various mfr's
    Brazilian M1908/34, Brno
    VZ24, 98/22, 98/29, Brno
    M1908 Brazilian, DWM
    M1909 Argentine, DWM
    M24/30 Venezuelan, FN
    M1935 Peruvian, FN
    Standard Modell, Mauser Oberndorf
    K98k, various mfr's

    Remember that the above list is not all-inclusive, the truth is, MOST M98 Mausers fall into this category.


    Type II, standard length, small ring, small shank
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980 small shank

    This is pretty much a Czechoslovakian design, the main members of this group are the VZ33 and the G33-40, a commercial version is the VZ47.


    Type III, standard length, small ring, large shank
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7,835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    As you can see by comparing the receiver ring diameter and the barrel shank diameter, there is not a lot of meat left in this receiver! The main example is the Kar98, and for obvious reasons, it is not wise to rechamber these to a high pressure cartridge.


    Type IV, standard length, small ring, small shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980 small shank

    These are mainly commercial models, they are identical to Type II, with the exception of a longer magazine to handle 30-06 length cartridges. Main examples are the Husqvarna commercial action, and the Brno ZG47.


    Type V, standard length, large ring, large shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410 large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    This is a beefier version of the Type IV. It is typified by the late FN commercial actions.


    M98 INTERMEDIATE LENGTH ACTIONS

    This is actually a fairly small group of models, the amount of headaches these cause (when trying to find a part or stock) is way out of proportion to the number of models. Most of these will have some part of the action shortened to save weight. Starting off with Type VI:

    Type VI, Oberndorf intermediate action
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.115
    Receiver ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    I call this the Oberndorf intermediate action, as they are the only ones who produced it. Commonly encountered models include:
    1903 Turk
    1909 Peruvian
    1935 Argentine
    Oberndorf Commercial

    The 1903 Turk and the 1909 Peruvian also share some other qualities. They both have a very high clip bridge, and a long curved arm on the ejector box that puts pressure on a stripper clip loaded into the receiver, holding it in place. The 1935 Argentine and the Oberndorf commercial action do not have this.
    This type has a longer than normal receiver ring, and a longer than normal cocking piece, with a shorter than normal bolt body, hard to figure where the weight savings come in!
    The Oberndorf commercial action was also available in a small ring version, all other dimensions identical.


    Type VII, FN24 and Yugo actions
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.115
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    This is the FN M24 action, and the Yugoslavian M48 series. I call this group the Yugoslavian intermediate action. There is also a Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican, see below.


    Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    I call the Type VIIA the Mexican large ring action. The only difference between the Type VII and VIIA is the length of the bolt body (0.050 difference).


    Type VIII, small ring Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.080
    Magazine length: 3.118
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    The Type VIII has the shortest bolt body in this group. Common models are the Mexican M1910, and M1936. Either one can be found manufactured by FN or Fabrica de Armas in Mexico City.

    LONG AND SHORT ACTIONS

    Now we are into the expensive stuff! The long actions and short actions are commercial only. The long actions are divided into 2 types, the "British" type and the French type. The British type are not necessarily made in England, but are usually chambered for British cartridges, such as the .416 Rigby or .404 Jeffery. The French type is even longer than the British type, but the French type is actually made in France.

    Type IX, British Type, aka M98 long, aka Commercial Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.150
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.770
    Magazine length: 3.640/3.840
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank


    Type X, French Type, aka French Magnum, aka Brevex Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.240
    Recvr screws, center to center: 8.207
    Bolt body length: 6.740
    Magazine length: 3.900
    Recvr ring dia: 1.500, X-large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.141, X-large shank.

    Notice that the French magnum is larger in every dimension than the British magnum, but the French bolt is shorter by .030"



    Type XI, "True" short action, aka Commercial Kurz
    Action OAL: 8.125
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.225
    Bolt body length: 5.760
    Magazine length: 2.725
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    These are very rare and expensive, and a collector's item on their own. Chambered for short cartridges such as the .250 Savage, they are so hard to come by that they are often made by cutting down a standard Type I M98 action. If you suspect you have one, look for a welded receiver just forward of the thumb cut. Bolts are usually welded just behind the aft end of the guide rib. (End quote).

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    Default

    Thanks for the info. J.

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    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Of the receivers on the list...

    In my own limited experience, I've used a few of these to build sporter type rifles. Lot of fun here. Well, time well spent, anyway.

    Right now the easiest to obtain Type I's are the VZ24's that recently came into the states. Available in various 'grades', they are all pretty sound, and the nicer ones are, well, nice. Just about any commercial aftermarket accessory fits these things.
    Others I've used are pre-war Oberndorfs, '09 Argentine (my first .35 Whelen was built on one of these) and 'some' K98's.

    I've used the Type II's, several of the Vz33's, and a couple of the G33/40's to make 'lightweight' sporters out of. Because they were originally done up as 8X57's, they also make really nice little 7X57, .257 Roberts and 6mm Remington chambered rifles, and feed them 'like a dog at a sausage trough'!
    The feller writing these descriptions puts the 1936 Mexican into it's own group farther down, but I put it with the Czech rifles. Small ring, small shank, use the same accessories, with just a hair difference in the bedding, mostly screw spacing differences. Got one of these that came as a 7X57 still wearing the original military barrel, and it's so nice I can't bring myself to make it into anything else, though if I do, it'll likely be a .250 Savage.

    I've got ONE 'Type III', and to be honest, I'm gonna take the thing back. The gunsmith I got it from just nearly cried great big crocodile tears when I bought it. When I pulled the barrel, my action wrench deformed the ring enough that I couldn't get the bolt back in. The thing is THIN!!! Got it straightened out, and always use a bolt body, or something to reinforce the ring when I wrench on these things nowadays. My personal opinion is that they're best made up into low pressure rounds, and I'd really be comfortable not making one up much bigger than a .32-20! (though I'm sure that SOMEONE will counter stating that they make wonderful .264 Win Mags!)

    Of the type IV bunch, I've used several of the Turk 98's that are large ring, small shank receivers, to make up 6.5 Swede rifles. Most of the time, the Turk 8mm barrels are beyond gone, and most wouldn't make good tomato stakes. When the surplus 1936 Swede barrels were available for cheap, we'd screw 'em on, chamber 'em, and shoot the heck out of 'em, most were really, really accurate, and that's the configuration we used to 'experiment' with warmish Swede loads. (not worth the effort by the way, but fun, anyway)

    The Yugo 48's are okay, just hard to find a stock that will fit without some major work. Some folks just make a new front receiver hole in the recoil buttress in the stock, and fill 'er full of glass when using a stock cut for a 'standard' 98 action. The things are just weird. One piece bases don't fit for crap, take a ton of work to make two piece jobs fit....and these days, they're not exactly cheap, up in the range where a good used commercial rifle can be had, so why bother!

    Thanks for posting the list! Most of the time, dealing with Mausers is like stickin' yer hand in a coffee can full of nightcrawlers, you just really, really don't know for sure what you have!

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