Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Any .480 Ruger shooters out there?

  1. #1

    Default Any .480 Ruger shooters out there?

    I was recently given a .480 Ruger Super Blackhawk by a generous family member. Probably wouldn't have been my pick, but I'm also not one to turn down a free firearm. I don't know much about this revolver though I'm learning thanks to the internet. It's primary duty will be a bear defense gun, but I'm also becoming intrigued by the possibility of using it for hunting, primarily black bears and Sitka black-tails in SE. Anybody else here shooting this gun? I'm interested to know if anyone has some good low recoil (relatively) loads they like for practice. Also what loads you like for defense and hunting applications. Factory ammo is limited (and expensive!) so plan to roll my own. I've never owned a handgun before this but have had some formal handgun training. This gun is the 6-shot version with a 7.5 " barrel. Any words of wisdom or load information regarding this gun would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    505

    Default Congratulations

    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    I was recently given a .480 Ruger Super Blackhawk by a generous family member. Probably wouldn't have been my pick, but I'm also not one to turn down a free firearm. I don't know much about this revolver though I'm learning thanks to the internet. It's primary duty will be a bear defense gun, but I'm also becoming intrigued by the possibility of using it for hunting, primarily black bears and Sitka black-tails in SE. Anybody else here shooting this gun? I'm interested to know if anyone has some good low recoil (relatively) loads they like for practice. Also what loads you like for defense and hunting applications. Factory ammo is limited (and expensive!) so plan to roll my own. I've never owned a handgun before this but have had some formal handgun training. This gun is the 6-shot version with a 7.5 " barrel. Any words of wisdom or load information regarding this gun would be greatly appreciated.
    What you have is a short version of the .475 Linebaugh. Some consider it superior to the .454 Casull for bear protection and hunting (because it throws a heavier bullet of larger diameter). Any bullet (slug) made for the Linebaugh should be OK in the .480 Ruger. Rolling your own is definitely the way to go because of bullet selection as well as cost.

    I don't know if you have experience reloading, so I will advise tungsten carbide dies (straight-walled pistol cases do not require lube if you use T-C dies. Go to the reloading forums and learn what you will find there and buy at least two reloading manuals so you get more than one point of view.

    Lost Sheep (Larry)
    Good shooting.

    Congratulations on a having a friend with such good sense and good taste.
    Last edited by Lost Sheep; 07-27-2008 at 01:08. Reason: spelling

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bakerton, WV
    Posts
    467

    Default

    I am sure you meant a Super Redhawk!
    The .480 is a super caliber but you either have to buy expensive custom loads like BB or are stuck with the anemic Hornady loads. You just have to reload for them to enjoy them.
    The Lee 400 gr is a great boolit and has two crimp grooves. With the longer cylinder of the SRH you can crimp in the lower groove and get pretty close to Linebaugh power without increasing pressure.
    I don't have any light loads to share but HS-6 will give you super accuracy for a mid power load.
    I have the BFR .475 and rarely if ever shoot light loads because it is my primary deer gun. I feel any gun used for hunting should be shot with the hunting load so you learn where it hits and get used to the recoil.
    Once you hunt with it, you will love it so much you might just sell your rifle!

  4. #4

    Default Thanks

    Oh ya, I meant Redhawk, it was late when I posted that. I've done plenty of reloading for center fire rifles but never for handguns. I'm assuming the basic steps are the same though I'll do some more research before starting out. I agree with the thought of practicing with what you'll use for hunting, but I also realize this is a big bore handgun and I want to make sure I develop good habits as I familiarize myself with this gun. Thanks for the replies. Definitely looking forward to using this gun, though I don't think I could ever sell my trusty 30-06.

  5. #5

    Default b. bear and deer loads

    I'd be interested to know what BFRSHOOTER thinks, but in the .480 Ruger, I think 1200 to 1250 fps with a good 400 gr. flat nosed bullet would be an excellent load, and you could go up to 1350 fps for larger game.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Glendale, Arizona
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I have a 480 and have only shot it with full loads, jacketed and cast. I have mostly used the gas check cast 375 grain from Cast Performance.

    I would recommend doing two things to make it easier to shoot.
    First change the grips to the Hogue or similar that fills in behind the trigger guard, it will bang your finger pretty hard unless you have a grip like superman.
    Second is the trigger when it is pulled all the way back it has a square edge, normally under the frame, that can scrape your trigger finger. My poor finger got skinned and bled. I took it part and rounded the edge with a file and then polished. Note the Redhawk is a bitc… bear to get back together so take notes while it comes apart.

    Mark

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bakerton, WV
    Posts
    467

    Default

    Yes 1200 fps or even a little less is all that is needed. Just need to find where it is the most accurate. No sense pushing to the limits if accuracy falls off. Always load for accuracy and don't worry about velocity. 1100, 1200 or 1300, the animal can't tell!
    Just do the normal workup from the minimum to max to see what a boolit likes.
    I say that about Hornady loads because we ran some .475's over the chrono and they were only as fast as .480's. Nothing to sneeze at but it seemed strange. I don't know what their .480's run.
    I have all kinds of boolits for my .475 and some need to be just short of sticky cases and others use less powder to shoot the best.
    Accuracy and stability is always king.
    Mclark, good suggestions on sharp edges. I have had to do it on Rugers. Scothbrite pads will remove scratches on stainless and it will match the original finish. Just rub in the direction of the original polish.

  8. #8
    Member jdb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Petersburg, Alaska
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I've been shooting mine since somewhere around 2001. I love it. I too have been using the 395 grain Cast Performance bullet with Lilgun at around 1350 fps. I have had the Wolverine treatment that Wildwest Guns in Anchorage does to reduce the weight of the Super Redhawk. The trigger pull is like a Smith now. What really sold me was the shortening of the barrel and the full moon clips. I use mine primarily as a back-up, not a hunting gun so this treatment fits just fine.

    I have loaded light loads using the True Shot 355 grain bullet and W231. I am getting around 800 fps and it shoots well. On a sidelight, John Taffin shot a bison with a 410 grain Cast Performance bullet at around 1000 fps. He shot the bison in the shoulder at about 60 yards. The bullet went through both shoulders of the bison, that should be sufficient to stop a bear to my way of thinking. I will look up my loads when I get home. Jim

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I've had one since shortly after they came out. It's a great hunting round. It offers ~30% more power than a 44 mag, but the recoil isn't overwelming like some of the more powerful handgun rounds. Also I've found that it is an amazingly accurate gun. When I had it scoped, I could work up a handload with almost every cast bullet I tried that would put 5 shots into a 1" group at 50 yds.

    I basically run two loads, a 275-300 gr cast bullet @ 1000 fps for practice, and a 400 gr @ 1200 fps for hunting. Yes you do need to handload to enjoy the potential of the round, it also helps if you cast your own bullets.




  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    526

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    I'd be interested to know what BFRSHOOTER thinks, but in the .480 Ruger, I think 1200 to 1250 fps with a good 400 gr. flat nosed bullet would be an excellent load, and you could go up to 1350 fps for larger game.
    I don't think you'll be able to get 1,350 with a 400 grain bullet. My .475 Linebaugh gets 1,350 with 26.5 grains of 296. The thing is that you don't need more than 1,200 fps with a 400 grainer. The .480 is a great round! You really don't need to push it hard to make it work. Just make sure yourload is accurate and have a good time!

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    My buddy was able to get 1350 out of his 480 using lil-gun and the special long nose 400 gr gc bullet I showed in my last post.

    But considering a 400 gr at a mere 1200 fps will shoot clear through most any game animal, you don't need to jack up the velocity.

  12. #12
    Member jdb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Petersburg, Alaska
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I agree with Paul. I have gotten 1350 out of the 395 grain bullet with Lilgun.it is a great powder for the 480. This revolver has always shot much better than I am capable of with any load I've tried. Jim

  13. #13

    Default Shot it this weekend

    Thanks for all the quality info folks. I took the .480 out to the range on Sunday. All I had to shoot was a box of Hornady factory ammo. Basically I just wanted to see what the recoil was like and if I could handle it. I was pleasantly surprised. It definitely packs a wallop, but it wasn't painful to shoot. I had heard some bad stories of guys hands bruising and such. I did get some pich from the trigger guard, that made me adjust my grip. I'll look into MClark's recommendation on a different grip. Otherwise I'm really looking forward to this gun. Looks like I've found something to do this winter.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    526

    Default

    Fullcurl, I have used three different grips on my .475 SRH, and the one that is currently on it is the best by far to date and I am very happy with it. The grip on the right in the photo is obviously the factory grip which while not bad, could be better. The grip in the middle is the Hogue wrap around which actually made the gun a lot worse to shoot. I have finally settled on the Hogue Tamer, on the left, which has a significant amount of padding. It is the best 20 bucksI've spent on the gun!


  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    The factory grip isn't bad, but you have to learn to grip it properly. I've had the exposed top strap open up the knuckle on my thumb I tried the original hogue and found that with your hand lower on the gun the muzzle whip was greatly increased, but the knuckle on your middle finger no longer got wacked by the trigger guard. I've subsequently got one of the hogue tamers, but haven't shot the gun since installing it.

    While the 480 doesn't have massive amounts of recoil, you still need to pay attention. When I was firest developing loads, I pushed my 460 gr bullet 1150 fps, extraction was sticky, and recoil was memorable.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    526

    Default

    Paul, you will be happy with the Tamers!! They have made a world of difference on my .475. The .480 still commands respect from a recoil standpoint in my humble opinion. It doesn't whip like a Casull, but it does push and torque -- at least mine did with 410s at 1,200 fps........

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I finally got the 480 to the range, and I give the tamer grip a big thumbs up. It is a great grip on the 480.

    I give my shooting abilty or rather lack there of a big thumbs down. If you haven't been shooting a handgun, it shows.

  18. #18

    Default Another 480

    Well, I had been considering getting a BFR .475 Linebaugh. I think it is a fine revolver. But, I came across a real killer deal locally on a barely used 480 Ruger SRH 7 1/2" bbl and went for it. I know the SRH well and while it is a pug ugly handgun, it functions very well. I already got some nicely cast 360 grain and 420 grain bullets from Ranger Rick and have ordered an NEI 420 grain plain base bullet mold to send to Rick and have him cast me some bullets. Yes, 1200 to 1250 fps is plenty for this cartridge. I still love the .44 magnum and will continue to shoot it regularly, but this 480 has really got something to it. A really well balanced big bore.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    100

    Default

    I have a .480 in a Puma lever with a 20" bbl and at the modest loading of 20gr of H110 and a 410gr cast with a gas check I'm getting 1300fps. This is what I was trying to get when I bought this rifle.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •