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Thread: Newbie- Progressive Press

  1. #1
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    Default Newbie- Progressive Press

    A newbie here looking at reloading pistol ammo (.45 mostly, but then 9 and .40 in the future). Was going to jump into a progressive press since I will be doing only pistol ammo. Have been reading the forum for a bit, and searched, but not tons of info on my decision:

    Looking at the Lee Pro 1000 , RCBS Pro 2000, or Hornady Lock-N-Load AP

    Any suggestions? Three different price levels as the Lee is $140, Hornady is $360 and RCBS is upper $400-500.

    Part of me wants to get RCBS off the bat and save money from upgrading. Although I have read plenty of good reviews on the Lee.

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2

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    I like my lock and load AP

  3. #3
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Herman View Post
    A newbie here looking at reloading pistol ammo (.45 mostly, but then 9 and .40 in the future). Was going to jump into a progressive press since I will be doing only pistol ammo. Have been reading the forum for a bit, and searched, but not tons of info on my decision:

    Looking at the Lee Pro 1000 , RCBS Pro 2000, or Hornady Lock-N-Load AP

    Any suggestions? Three different price levels as the Lee is $140, Hornady is $360 and RCBS is upper $400-500.

    Part of me wants to get RCBS off the bat and save money from upgrading. Although I have read plenty of good reviews on the Lee.

    Thanks for any help!
    You might want to kick this idea around for a while.

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/con...___039_B__039_
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
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    There is only one progressive press worth dragin' home.....DILLON, and in this case it would be the 550, you'll never regret it.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks for the Dillon suggestion. I had heard about them but thought they were a lot more expensive the RCBS.

    Thanks

  6. #6

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    Dillon and you will be happy

  7. #7

    Talking Newbie-Progressive Press

    Like I have said, do your home work and jump in. I was/am a LEE fan because of the company history, economical cost and great products. That being said each company makes a great product so it comes down to the old Ford vs Chevy or S&W vs Ruger (no I am starting an argument line). I had the luck recently to get back into reloading after having to sell everything due to family issues by my wife surprising me with a PRO2000. This was something I would not have purchased as I could get a LEE and several additional items for what this cost but hey gotta love her. I can say that I have had the LEE PRO1000 for 38/357 and it was great. Good luck and welcome to the reloading world. It will lead you to more guns because you have to have more things to reload

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    Default

    I'm a Lee guy - great price and great company. However, when I got started I went with the Lee auto-indexing turret press. (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=622290)
    I think a turret press makes a better first press than a progressive. You want to go slow and master each step, especially the setup, when you are getting started. The turret lets you start using it as a single stage but the turret saves on setup time. With the auto-indexing, I get fast enough production rates for my needs.
    The following discussion has some good information, especially reply #9. http://www.go2gbo.com/forums/index.p...,147216.0.html
    There is lots of good equipment out there. You are doing the right thing by doing your homework first. Spend lots of time reading your reloading manuals and equipment instructions. Then take it very slowly at first. It isn't hard but you have to pay attention to all the details.
    Welcome to a very fun and educational aspect of shooting.

  9. #9

    Default Go single stage

    I strongly suggest that if you have not done reloading before, that you should start with a single stage press to learn the basics of reloading. It's the old walk before you run reality. If you first learn to drive, do you start with a basic car or a Ferrari? Starting with a progressive can get you in trouble. You need to already know the proper steps to know if something is amiss. I loaded commercially for years and now that I don't, I still load with a single stage. I enjoy it. If you know someone who is a competent loader who is willing to help you get started, even better. It is a great and safe pasttime if you are careful. Enjoy!

  10. #10
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    Default

    Thanks for all the input and info, greatly appreciated! Yeah, i have a couple of friends that can show me the ropes which is good. I've already read most of Lee's reloading manual. I have thought about the Lee turret press vs a progressive press for that reason, to learn the ropes and then advance my press after i have mastered the basics and safety aspects of loading. If I do that, I will probably go with the Lee turret press. Thanks again!

  11. #11
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Dillon!

    I just recently (after 40 years of reloading on several single stage presses) picked up a 550 model Dillon. Where has this press been all my life? Sat down last weekend and loaded 500+ rounds of .45 ACP in a couple of hours.
    Customer support, parts ordering, timely delivery (as fast as you want to pay for) and good, solid engineering made me go the way I did when I finally stepped up to a progressive, and the store sells all the brands.
    Good outfit!!!

  12. #12
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    Dillon 550 for beginners.....I started single stage 31 years ago, got my first dillon in 87,...I know several guys who started with a dillon, not a problem if you are somewhat mechanicly inclined and can read.

    If you plan on loading lots ie..1000 monthly then go with the 650. The priming system on the 650 is supurb to the 550.

    If you plan on loading more then that, the 1050 is the only way to go. It has lots of leverage (less tiring) and makes military brass a breeze.

    Warning-reloading isn't cheaper as a matter of fact will cost your budget more. However, shots downrange will increase drasticly......Oh, Dillons multiply....not as bad as rabbits but close

  13. #13
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Another Dillon 550 user here. If I have the extra primer tubes all full, all the brass right next to me and my auto bullet feeder available (my 12 y.o. son) I can actually make 550 rounds of .45ACP in one hour. I have made some of my most accurate rounds of .22-250 on this press.

  14. #14

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    Another Dillon vote here but for the Square Deal "B". I bought this thing when it was first on the market 22-24 years ago. I've probably put 30k rounds through it and it has always served me well. The only dislike is that it woun't do rifle cartridges. For that I have a RCBS and really like it too.
    Customer service (huge in my book) is right there with Nordstrom.

  15. #15

    Default have to do it

    OK I also have to reload , ordered my Les Baer 45 today . SO I want a dillon and the only 2 calibers I plan on doing is 9mm and 45 ACP , should I go with the 550 or the Square Deal ?

  16. #16

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    550 because of the extra die stations will be useful and ease of caliber change

  17. #17
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roman View Post
    OK I also have to reload , ordered my Les Baer 45 today . SO I want a dillon and the only 2 calibers I plan on doing is 9mm and 45 ACP , should I go with the 550 or the Square Deal ?

    It really depends on your budget. I have had every iteration of the 550 my machine started life as the first 400 and went through every free up grade that Mike Dillion did. If you are going to shoot pistol the square deal is a heck of a bargain. I now have two RL-1000 and one RL-1050, all are the extreme ends of the spectrum. For the money, the square deal is a heck of a deal. most people that use a 550 for rifle and pistol would be better served with a single stage press for rifle and the square deal for pistol.

    My issues with the 550, was do to my son reloading for his 92 FS Beretta, and replacing the barrel for him when he skipped a charge. I traded the press the same week. I put him back on a single stage RCBS and made him slow down and think. This was years ago and I have not replaced another barrel for him due to the same cause. Now I don't sweat him using any of my machines.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  18. #18

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    powder check alarm die Dillon sells helps prevent no charge or double charges

    best prevention is paying attention, remove all distractons when reloading, clear the press if you have a malfunction, double check everything, good housekeeping, no matter what gear one uses

    The bulge in my 45 barrel reminds me of violating those rules! No charge, stuck bullet, shot the next round...

    I double charged loading with a lyman tong tool once in a 38 and locked up a Model 13 pretty good with primer flow to the firing pin hole

    My buddy did it twice with his Giles 45 using a 1050...I bought him the powder checker for my own safety!!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen-ak View Post
    powder check alarm die Dillon sells helps prevent no charge or double charges

    best prevention is paying attention, remove all distractons when reloading, clear the press if you have a malfunction, double check everything, good housekeeping, no matter what gear one uses

    The bulge in my 45 barrel reminds me of violating those rules! No charge, stuck bullet, shot the next round...

    I double charged loading with a lyman tong tool once in a 38 and locked up a Model 13 pretty good with primer flow to the firing pin hole

    My buddy did it twice with his Giles 45 using a 1050...I bought him the powder checker for my own safety!!!
    I agree, the powder check die is worth the small price for the peace of mind, all my Dillon presses have the added check die. Just make sure the batteries are good each time you use the dies.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  20. #20
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    so can you add a powder check die to the 550? i know the 650 comes with it. thanks

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