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Thread: 6.5 swede 100 years old

  1. #1

    Default 6.5 swede 100 years old

    I was putting together some light loads for my 1912 Chilean in 7x57 when it occured to me that my 1896 carl gustav 6.5 swede was made in 1908 and is in fact 100 years old this year. It has always been old but this blows my mind. 100 years old. I shoot it regularly, it is beautiful and beautifully put together and is very accurate. I even make a point to take it hunting each year. 100 years and still working perfectly I can't imagine any other tool working after 100 years. My latest purchase, a cz 9.3x62 is in my mind a perfect hunting rifle but really nothing more than a copy of a 100 year old design and not as smooth. What else has stood the test of time like that? Wow.

  2. #2

    Talking glad for you

    Quote Originally Posted by 35gibber View Post
    I was putting together some light loads for my 1912 Chilean in 7x57 when it occured to me that my 1896 carl gustav 6.5 swede was made in 1908 and is in fact 100 years old this year. It has always been old but this blows my mind. 100 years old. I shoot it regularly, it is beautiful and beautifully put together and is very accurate. I even make a point to take it hunting each year. 100 years and still working perfectly I can't imagine any other tool working after 100 years. My latest purchase, a cz 9.3x62 is in my mind a perfect hunting rifle but really nothing more than a copy of a 100 year old design and not as smooth. What else has stood the test of time like that? Wow.
    I envy you still having your nice 6.5, as they are great rifles. My first big game rifle was a white oak, custom stocked 6.5 carbine. I didn't reload then and only ammo available was military surplus. I took the biggest Muley that I've ever shot with that rifle, plus a few more, but I sadly wounded two that I lost. I traded it off ( a mistake that still haunts me to this day) for an '06. I wish I still had it...handloading for it would make it what it always was...a very sweet rifle. I know you're really enjoying yours. Thanks.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    108 year old M/96 Oberndorf
    101 year old M/94-14 carbine Carl Gustaf
    65 year old M/38 Husqvarna
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Actions

    Beautiful firearms!

    Is that the Mauser Action that people desire?

    I've never had anything like that.. I've got Grandpas' first Rem721 in 300 H&H but it's not as nice as those.

  5. #5
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    The Swedish Mauser rifles are desirable due to their great workmanship and superior accuracy. They are not as strong as the later Model 98 Mausers.

    The Swedes and the Norwegians started working on a cartridge and rifle combination to replace the older Rolling Block rifles they had been using.

    Eventually they formed a committee and developed the 6.5 x 55mm cartridge. That is why it does not have the same head diameter as the other Mauser cartridges of that era.

    The rifle selection process turned into a competition of sorts and the Norwegian Krag rifles were closely competing with the entries submitted by Paul Mauser.

    Norway decided to go with the Krag while Sweden went with the German Mauser, by way of the 1894 Carbine. This was followed up a couple years later by the Model 1896 Rifle. The first Carbines and Rifles being made by the Mauser factory at Oberndorf Germany on the Necker River. These were made using Swedish supplied steel which was considered to be the best on the planet at the time.

    The Swedish Model 94s and Model 96s had some improvements over the Mauser Model 93s and 95s then being marketed around the world. Although they all cocked on closing the bolt as opposed to the later and betetr M-98 which cocks on opening.


    Later manufacture of the Swedish rifles was taken up under license at the Carl Gustaf (the royal factory) rifle factory in Sweden.

    In the late 1930s, many of the M/96 rifles were cut down in length to produce the M/38 rifle (23.5 inch barrel) . In 1941 Husqvarna started making purpose built M/38 rifles and a few M/96 rifles. They stopped around 1944.
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default SE

    Can I get one in a stainless ane synthetic for SE AK? LOL

    Thank you for the history.....I really enjoyed it. I often hear of people developing new modern rifles off a Mauser action. Do you have any examples or history of that?

    Honestly though.....I'd be really concerned about taking that fine firearm out for a week of bear hunting, ect...... I like a really nice fuctional gun with some history but don't want to ruin it.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    My oldest one was issued to the Swedish Army for 80 years. It seems to have faired pretty well. But then again the Swedes were / are super anal about weapons maintenance.

    Sorta like how the US Navy (my first branch) managed to keep a bunch of classic Thompsons, BARS, Trenchguns and other cool stuff looking like new from the 1920s up until they were replaced in the 1970s. Even while in a constant salt water enviroment.

    When I lived in Petersburg (your area of the State), I used to carry around a Model 71 Winchester in 348 or my original 1886 Winchester in 45-70. I kinda miss Petersburg.
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  8. #8
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Can I get one in a stainless ane synthetic for SE AK? LOL

    Thank you for the history.....I really enjoyed it. I often hear of people developing new modern rifles off a Mauser action. Do you have any examples or history of that?

    Honestly though.....I'd be really concerned about taking that fine firearm out for a week of bear hunting, ect...... I like a really nice fuctional gun with some history but don't want to ruin it.
    It all started after world war one. The NRA magazine for the next fifty years ran thousands of articles about conversions of Mausers and Springfield, Enfield and others. Go to Brownells on line book section and pick out four or five books on the subject. There is a wealth of material available.

    http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/sto...&ps=10&si=True
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by 35gibber View Post
    What else has stood the test of time like that? Wow.
    Sadly relegated mostly to the musty dungeons of "serious" collectors, I'll toss the Winnie 1886 into the category. They're still great shooters and performers when you get them away from the hoarders.

    I've still got one in 38-56 that's a sheer joy to carry and hunt with. Hopefully all those great 6.5's can go on a few more years before they become too "valuable" to carry and hunt with. What a sad fate for a great gun when that happens.

  10. #10
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Collectors

    My landlord is such a "hoarder". The gentleman has like 100 different rifles stowed away in the basement.....and I've never seen him load up the gear and head to the range or hunt.

    I'd love to see more photos of classic irons. I'm really impressed with what craftsmen were able to create before the computer generation. I think there was more touch and feel involved.... and with an object solely bound to function in the hands of man thats important.

    I think thats why bow hunters gravitate towards take down bows, recurves, and long bows. I tend to hunt for more than the "Bang".

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    Default 6.5 Swedish

    Introduction to the 6.5 was by the same surplus route with inexpensive but superb old rifles. I a world of "military battle rifles" with huge groups, first shooting the 6.5 Swedish is a shocker. This is an Olympic grade cartridge.

    Quick lateral thought..... A reporter-babe asked an old Finnish war vet (from the Fin-Russian war) if he found it hard to shoot a man. He said, "yes", especially when they were running!

    Or as the recent reporter-babe asked one of our snipers in Iraq what he felt when he shot a man... answer..."recoil".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    My oldest one was issued to the Swedish Army for 80 years. It seems to have faired pretty well. But then again the Swedes were / are super anal about weapons maintenance.
    Kinda helps not ever having fought a war with one

    Like K31s

  13. #13
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Kinda helps not ever having fought a war with one
    That is true, except for the Swedes involvement in the Finnish Civil war.

    Then later the Swede rifles shipped to Finland for the Winter war and the Continuation war.
    And then there were those Swedish Volunteer battalions fighting in Finland against the Russians during the winter war and Continuation war. Then UN duties after that.
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  14. #14

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    Sadly relegated mostly to the musty dungeons of "serious" collectors

    Yep, it seems like about 6-7 years ago all of the Swedes disappeared. I am envious of float pilot as i wanted to pick up an m38 for hunting but just couldn't find one other than those gun show profiteers with ridiculous prices. I had previously passed a couple up waiting for "that one" ......Dumb *****. The obendorf, i believe the rarest and most sought after of the m96s (again Mr Float pilot has one) seems to be as rare as rocking horse poop. I have found one but it has a #3 barrel and looks like someone towed it behind the truck to the store. I may give it a shot though.

    I admit that mine goes hunting in better weather, but it does go! and of course regularly to the range.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    Kinda helps not ever having fought a war with one

    Like K31s
    not to mention the Swedish volunteers on the eastern front, although, I do think they used Swedish Mausers,

    AFA the rifle, I have a 1900 Obendorf marked SA, so it belonged to Finland for a while, during the two wars with Russia....

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