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Thread: King Of The Mountain

  1. #1

    Default King Of The Mountain

    Just wondered how many guys have used any of King of the Mountain's wool products. I have always worn fleece, but I will be doing a horse back hunt at the end of Sept in B.C. and the weather is sure to be nasty. If I can keep moving I am fine, but if I have to sit still I freeze my butt off.
    I am a little concerned about the weight of wool (it seems to be too heavy to wear when climbing) and about drying it out when it gets wet.

    Also has anyone ever worn the "Noggin-Boggin" hat made by Raven Wear? It is supposed to be very warm and light but I have never seen one or worn one. I am looking for a hat that is super warm but also lightweight. I am even considering a musher type hat with real fur but don't know how it will hold up if it gets wet.

    One more thing. Does Schnee's make a waterproof pack boot? I have a pair of Schnee's that I really like but they are not water-proof and in wet snow my feet get wet. If not, what other type of water-proof pack boots would be good? I have a pair of Meindles that I wear sheep hunting but they fit too snug and would be too cold to wear on this trip. Any help for these questions would be great.

  2. #2

    Default

    I wear nothing but wool. It needs to be cold before I wear my KOM. Nothing works or wears better under extreme conditions. But, don't plan on using KOM this year. It'll take at least year to get a full set unless they have drastically changed. I've waited over a year for just a shirt. I have a friend who sent his pants in for repairs and waited months. Great product, very bad service.

    Keep the Schnees, buy extra linings, and Gore-Tex socks.

  3. #3
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    Fleece will do anything wool can do but do it better and for less. It is lighter and warmer. Fleece WILL NOT absorb water and can essentially be shaken dry. Not only is wool more expensive and heavier when dry but water will combine with the lanolin making wool MUCH HEAVIER when wet and MUCH HARDER to dry. When one of my old hunting partners first came to Alaska 20 years ago he was a nothing but wool guy. It was all he had used in North Dakota. I finally got him to try fleece, one thing led to another and now he only uses fleece and has gotten rid of all his wool. The colder and wetter it is the better fleece is. Properly prepared and water proofed, I have found my pac type boots (including the Schnee's that I own) to be completely water proof. Of course this also means that they are not only water proof from the outside in but also from the inside out. Each foot can loose up to a liter of perspiration a day.

  4. #4

    Default fleece/wool

    What do you wear under your fleece? Do you use Windstopper lining? I looked at some Polartec stuff once and it seemed pretty nice. I think this is one of those subjects where about half of the guys will swear by fleece and the others will swear by wool.

    I hate buying stuff through the mail because I like to try clothes on for fit. I am also very weight conscious and don't like to be burdened down in bulky clothing. However, I also hate to be cold. I did see some KOM wool at a sports show and it seemed heavy and bulky to me. I am not worried about staying warm when stalking game; I worry about it when I am in the saddle for hours at a time. And, I am still concerned about wool getting wet.

    I am interested in the type of fleece that you have and how you layer for extreme conditions. If you feel like passing this on, that'd be great.

  5. #5

    Default

    The Windstopper fleece works well, I have some lightweight fleece jackets with and without windstopper, and there's a big difference. The Windstopper works!

    As for layering - I haven't hunted BC in September, but have hunted Alaska in mid to late September several times. I typically wear a lightweight to midweight polypro long underwear layer, light sock liners under good wool socks, lightweight to midweight fleece pants and shirt, and a windstopper fleece jacket. I also carry a fleece vest that goes over the shirt and under the jacket if needed, but only when sitting, too warm when moving.

    If still cold, I have a poly/cotton jacket liner that goes over the vest and under the windstopper jacket, and also have some pullover lightweight goretex rain pants that I use more as a windstopper outer pant layer than rain pants. I have only used the jacket liner and rain pants as outer pant layer on one late September hunt, where the wind blew at 25-35 mph every day and midday temps were in the low 40s, with nighttime temps in the teens. Was plenty warm with this setup.

    Fleece works, and layering works. If you can keep out the wind, that goes a long way to keeping warm.

  6. #6

    Default fleece

    The hunt is at the end of Sept. and goes into Oct. Any precip will be either cold rain or snow (a lovely combo). I talked to a fellow that hunted there last year and he said that they got pounded with snow and bad weather.

    What type of fleece do you prefer and where do you get it? I don't think that all the stuff is created equal. Patagonia has some nice stuff but I have never bought from them because I heard that they are big anti-hunters. Thanks again for the info...

  7. #7

    Default

    One thing about KOM, It is really heavy and bulky clothing compared to any thing else. I have no doubt it is really warm stuff. Ken

  8. #8
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Wool

    Just curious - what will you be hunting in BC and where? Id love to hunt that country.

    Regarding your inquiry about KOM wool:
    - Wool is flam retardant - Fleece is not.
    - Wool provides superior insulation over any synthetic fabric even when wet fleece will not keep you warm when wet.
    - Get a good set of rain gear and incorporate it as an external layer when appropriate (rain - heavy wind).
    - Specific to KOM pants: they have built in ass and knee pads. This is a great feature that you will appreciate when crawling/sliding around on rocks/shale/gravel & sitting in the saddle for +5 hours.

    Just my opinion; but whenever I go on a remote hunt I bring KOM wool (2-Sets: 1 light weight & 1 standard weight). It is durable, dependable, and warm and it just might save my life should I have to spend an exposed night/nights under the stars.

    Good hunting!

  9. #9

    Default fleece

    I will be hunting goat and moose. It is close to Muncho Lake/Toad River. This guy's exclusive area is over 6000 sq. miles.

    I have no doubt that wool is warm, but again I worry about the weight and bulk. If it is raining or snowing and we are climbing for goats, wearing the wool plus rain gear would be tough. I just haven't had enough experience with wool and hate to spend the kind of money that KOM wants for their stuff and then be dissatified. I know my first impression of their product when I saw it at a sports show was it was very heavy and bulky. If I knew that it would be cold enough to snow and stay cold, the wool would seem like a good choice, but getting it wet and drying it out has me a bit concerned.

    Still up in the air...

    Thanks for the info.

  10. #10
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Default

    Nice, your going to like goat hunting its a ton of fun! And they make for an exceptional trophy. Good luck!

  11. #11

    Default Buying Fleece...

    I'd try the Campmor, Sierra trading Post, and Cabela's websites. Compare the costs for similar fleece products, and go from there.

  12. #12
    Member n0g0d's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
    fleece will not keep you warm when wet.


    Fleece will keep you warm when wet.

  13. #13

    Default

    I have been looking at Cabela's berber fleece and their legacy fleece. I have a Wooltimate vest that is only 20% wool that I like pretty well. Besides a shirt and gloves those are the only three bits of wool clothing I own. If I remember, the berber fleece is pretty bulky and a buddy told me that snow tends to stick to it like a magnet. I am leaning towards layering with a heavy-weight fleece pullover that has windstopper in it. I am wondering if the 1/2 pile berber fleece soaks up a lot of water. I have water-repellent that I spray on my other outer garments to help shed water so could probably do the same there. I wonder if the shorter fleece would be as warm as the thicker stuff. Anyone out there have suggestions?

  14. #14
    New member ArkansasHunter's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm looking at fleece alternatives myself.

    Being an Arkansas hunter, we don't have much need for the specialized fabrics so cotton has always worked for me. Now, with an Alaskan bear hunt in September, I'm "upgrading" to the synthetic stuff.

    I had looked at wool, too, just because it's a natural fiber. Bosh! The cost alone for brands like King Of The Mountain (and even the Cabela's stuff) has kept me away. The added weight is also a concern.

    So, fleece, it seems, is the way to go. I'm using Under Armour base layers as they have worked in all kinds of weather conditions. Yes, we get rain and cold down here! Of course, maybe not like Alaska...

    I'm looking at some lightweight fleece from either Cabela's or Bass Pro Shops simply for price. If it's only going to be a mid-layer, it's the place to compromise for $$$. Outer layer, though, I don't think there's any other choice but something with Windstopper or similar "technology". I do have a simple fleece jacket with Windstopper and it makes a HUGE difference in comparison.

    Does anyone else have an opinion or experience with the Berber-style fleece? It looks awfully comfy, but I question whether that necessarily equates to field effectiveness.

    I'll be keepin' an eye on this thread. Sounds like 6.5-284 and I are working towards the same goal in getting geared up quick. This place is definitely the spot to do research - especially for an Alaskan Expedition!

    Thanks!

  15. #15
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Default

    In my opinion KOM wool and other similar high end wool camo gear is pretty expensive for what you get. Some of it might be okay for sitting in a tree stand or bow hunting, but not for backpack hunting. If you want light wool pants I would go with Filson whipcord and Filson Mackinaw pants for heavier wool.

  16. #16
    New member ArkansasHunter's Avatar
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    Default

    That's what I figured, too. I mean, if you're going to be sitting in a deer stand in Alberta or Saskatchewan for 8 hours or so at a clip, the ultra-high end wool would be excellent. However, if you're going to be moving around - at all - this would heat you up but quick.

    I'm also assuming that there would be another layer in there, let's say some Under Armour or a similar base layer.

    I'm heading up just North of Anchorage in (only) two weeks. As much hiking as I figure Jake will have us doing, I'm going with the lighter stuff!

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