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Thread: Enforcing without the shock collar

  1. #1
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    Default Enforcing without the shock collar

    I have used the shock collar to help enforce what my dog already knows she is supposed to be doing for over a year. The shock collar has been with her from the very begining of her training until right now. I have been doing some new training with my dog. She knows what she is to do now when she hears the command. When I get her all jazzed up and use reward training she executes the command with enthusiasm, however when she is away from me she always tries to push the issue and see just how much she can get away with not doing. In that instance I have been using the shock collar to enforce what she knows she is supposed to be doing. Has anyone had any luck correcting similar problems without the shock collar?

  2. #2
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    I have the same issue with my male lab. I think he got so used to the collar that now when the collar is off he knows it and he can get away with things because of not having it on. He also trys to push the limits when his collar is on and I dont have the remote in my hand. Such smart dogs arent they.........Good thread to start, I will enjoy seeing different techniques posted on here

  3. #3

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    You can always buy a "dummy collar" to trick the dog into thinkin that she has the real deal on and it might work for you, i know my dog would realize when it had and did not have the collar on. I used to have a different type of strap for her collar with the beeper on it so when i took him to train or in the field, i would slide the reciever onto that strap and he new it was game time, that worked well for me.
    Steve

  4. #4
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    Ya, that is a great idea but mine knows exactly when I dont have the remote also.....

  5. #5
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    Default Dont give up the collar/be more consistant

    I have dogs that are collar wise as well. Years ago when I lived alone and I trained every day the dogs did not have the option to refuse a command and they were not collar wise. Now that we train a few times a week and there is another more lax human in the house, the dogs have multiple opportunities to refuse a command during the day. Not only are they wise to the collar but the Great Dane/Greyhound knows it all comes from the remote in my hand. I’ve just realized why.
    I don’t think the answer is to not using the collar. I think it is being more persistent with the collar. Break down drills and training to deal with one issue at a time. Watch your timing and level of stimulation to be just enough to get the dog to react. It’s not punishment that you’re after its conditioning a response.
    The old TriTronics A-70’s came with brief instructions that read like a college psych class experiment but was very clear on the conditioning aspect. Say you’re working on a simple recall. The dog turns off the stimulation by heading to the handler. Eventually the dog’s head will snap to the handler on the first “Here”. He knows that if he takes two more steps, the 2nd “here” is uncomfortable. Same with sit, over, fetch but they all need the teaching groundwork first.
    Later when you chain all these commands together one at a time the dog doesn’t know any other response to the command.
    What illustrates this best for me is our two rescued dogs this year. Our first and only command to learn for a month was “Here”, every day moving from leashes to long lines to the collar only. They both have a better recall response than the 6 year old field bred dog. Her recall training started 6 years ago but went on the back burner as we trained handling and other skills. Of course, she always returned with a retrieve but if she’s off sniffing something or visiting a neighbor she goes deaf. Her response is not conditioned to come back with nothing in her mouth.

    I think if your coming up on a hunt test find a time of day to focus on one thing, a couple short sessions a day for a week. Put the dog up each time for a while and don’t let the dog get into a situation where he can refuse that command. Then move on to another. Eventually work them in together, chaining the responses. Such as Sit, Fetch, Here, Heal, Drop. If you have a problem with one, stop and only work on that response or you’ll end up with a confused mess. Same thing with overs and back. Break it down and repeat it.

    Just watch your timing, collar level and be very consistent. If its any consolation, Jim Gonia told me once that he hoped to hang onto 60% of the training by the last series. Even the top dogs start doing their own thing after a while, you just pray it’s the right thing.

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