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Thread: Twist rate? Ruger MkII .35 Whelen

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    Default Twist rate? Ruger MkII .35 Whelen

    Anybody know what twist Ruger used when they did the .35 Whelen?

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Check out Ruger's web site. They are offering the 35 Whelen in the Hawkeye lineup come this August. Stainless and wood/blued.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Don't know for sure, but I'd guess a 1-12 as that's what they used on their 350 rem mag.

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    Default Ruger Rifling Rates

    RUGER RIFLE TWIST RATES PER RUGER COMPANY


    458 Lott 1 in 14
    416 Rigby 1 in 14
    375 HH 1 in 12
    375 Ruger 1 in 12
    35 Whelen 1 in 16 Hawkeye and Hawkeye Stainless
    350 Remington Mag 1 in 12 All weather stainless
    350 Remington Mag 1 in 14 Standard M-77
    358 Winchester 1 in 12
    338 Federal 1 in 10
    338 Win Mag 1 in 10
    300 Win Mag 1 in 10
    30-06 1 in 10
    280 Remington 1 in 9.5
    308 Wincester 1 in 10
    7mm Rem Mag 1 in 9.5
    7mm -08 1 in 9.5
    270 Winchester 1 in 10
    260 Remington 1 in 8
    25-06 1 in 10
    257 Roberts 1 in 10
    243 Winchester 1 in 9
    22-250 Rem 1 in 14
    223 Remington 1 in 12 in bolt action
    204 Ruger 1 in 12
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    Anybody know why 1 in 16 is the choice of any recent offering in .35 whelen? Is it because of factory ammo or what?

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    I have a custom 1 in 15 twist and it shoots 250 grain partitions into one hole at a hundred and I've shot less than 2" pretty consistantly at 200 yards. I do not load heavier bullets much but it does shoot 275 Kodiaks very well. I don't think Id'ant faster than 1 in 14 but I don't know if 1 in 16 is good for 250 grainers. Interesting about the difference between their 350 and 35 Whelen, they produce the same velocity.
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    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default my Ruger

    My Mk II was rebarrelled to 35 Whelen. It has a 1 in 14 twist rate and shoots 250 gr. bullets quite well.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    My 350 rigby is a 1-14, and my 350 rem mag a 1-12. Personally I can't see going with slower than 1-14. I know remington went 1-16 on their whelens, and I assume Ruger just followed suit. That should be plenty of twist on most 250 gr bullets. The barnes 250 tsx might not stabalize, but I think the 225 gr is at least as good, and picks up 200 fps.

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    I have a ruger #1 limited edition, it's chambered in 35 whelen...walnut and stainless, the rate of twist in it happens to be 1:12" I've been loading barnes 225gr. tsx bullets over 57.5 gr. of h 4895...22"Bbl my chrony says 2623fps avg of 15 shots. She shoots as good as she looks

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    This morning I measured the twist rate of my Ruger M-77 that was built in January 1992. The rate measured 1 turn in 10 inches. I have an owner's manual for this rifle but it does not say what the twist rate is. Elsewhere on internet I have read that the .35 Whelen originally was forumulated to have a 1:10 barrel, and that with that twist rate it is supposed to be optimal for 250 grain bullets. My bench experience with this particular .35 Whelen shows that it achieves groups of approximately 2 1/2 inches at 100 yards, using commercial Remington ammo. After purchase I immediately swapped out the new wood stock for a black synthetic stock. I really believe that this rifle should shoot more accurately than it does. I had been suspecting that the rifling twist rate was wrong for the 250 grain round nose bullet. But, my measurement of 1:10 twist, coupled with the information the the original Whelen set-up was a 1:10 barrel with a 250 grain bullet, indicates that I should have a winner. But the bench sight-in's shows that this is not the case. I may have to switch back to the original wood stock and see if accuracy improves.

    Can anyone enlighten me as to why, when the original set-up for .35 Whelen featured a 1:10 twist barrel, that Ruger changed my old 1992 model into more modern versions with greater twist? How can you folks achieve greater accuracy with faster twist barrels than I can with my "the way God made it" 1:10 twist?

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    The 1 in 16 in the Whelen should do the 225 grain bullets just fine. My only concern is that the 350 rem mag ruger markII are still going for $399 NIB on Gunbroker. I may go that route.

    Thanks for the chart float pilot.
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    Default 350....

    Quote Originally Posted by RMiller View Post
    The 1 in 16 in the Whelen should do the 225 grain bullets just fine. My only concern is that the 350 rem mag ruger markII are still going for $399 NIB on Gunbroker. I may go that route.

    Thanks for the chart float pilot.
    Might as well, I just did. And if you ever want a lil' more power you can rechamber to 35wsm.

    Jake

  13. #13

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    I bought a 350RM All-Weather and just took it out the range this past weekend. Shot some 225gr. TSX at 2700fps. Very impressive!!! They were impressively accurate and got everyone's attention when I started shooting steel with them LOL!!!

    I like the gun and if you can still get that deal you'll be happy, as long as you reload or like Remington Core-Lokts. in 200gr.

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    I was thinking 35 RCM myself.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CZ_IN_AK View Post
    Might as well, I just did. And if you ever want a lil' more power you can rechamber to 35wsm.

    Jake
    Good score. You get the blued or the stainless model?

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    Kar98K, There are many aspects of accuracy besides twist and stock material & fit. You don't mention if you have tried other brands of ammunition and/or bullet weights. This would be one of the first things I would check - besides having a good probability of bettering your group size, it's relatively cheap and easy to do. There are a number of good texts dealing with accurizing rifles written by people with far more knowledge than I on the subject. As far as bullet weights go I suspect that a twist of 1 in 10 was chosen because many of the early .35 Whelen rifles were bored out 30-06 barrels that already had a 1 in 10 twist and therefore were more easily re-bored to that twist rate. That being said if one consults Greenhills formula for bullet stability (or other stability factor calculations) one gets the following:
    For jacketed bullets with a mean density of ~10.9 gm/cc the following data are calculated for a 250 grain, .358 caliber, jacketed bullet having a pointed ogive and for MINIMUM twist – bear in mind that increased air density (i.e. colder air) requires a bullet to have more spin to stabilize it:


    Greenhill number // twist rate // distance per revolution
    170 // 49.4 calibers/rev //1 turn in 17.7”

    150* // 43.6 calibers/rev // 1 turn in 15.6”

    130 // 37.7 calibers/rev // 1 turn in 13.5”

    *A Greenhill number of 150 is customary for these calculations.

    Bear in mind that while too little spin will cause unstable flight, too much will prevent the bullet from pitching over at apogee, i.e. as it drops the axis of the bullet will remain the same as when it exited the muzzle. Only when the twist rate grossly exceeds requirements will accuracy suffer to a significant degree. The trend in recent years of American riflemakers has been to "just enough" spin to stabilize the more popular bullet weights in any given caliber. I hope this helps you understand the physics behind your question rather than just an arbitrary and somewhat limited answer would.
    Last edited by CrustyJohn; 09-03-2008 at 12:00. Reason: table format didn't paste correctly

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Good score. You get the blued or the stainless model?
    I got the Stainless model.

    Jake

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