Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Float hunting gear list

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    555

    Default Float hunting gear list

    Me and a buddy are floating the Ivishak next month for Caribou.

    Wondering if anyone is willing to share their list of stuff they take on a float hunt.

    Neat ideas that are outside the box thinking would be great.

  2. #2
    Member Casper50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    627

    Default

    A cable comealong is one of the must haves.

  3. #3
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default Sharp Knife

    I'll think over the list but it won't be a lot different than the one in Mike Strahan's book.

    One difference is that I have recently started using the Piranta (Havelon) knife. No more dull blades for me - just take out the dull blade and put in a new surgically sharp blade.

  4. #4
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Some thoughts...

    I float NW Alaska rivers in the Fall and have found that rock bags work much better than stakes. Just fill the bags with rocks, which are everywhere in NW and I presume where you are going. Then one simple over hand knot to attach the bag cinch cord to the tent corners where the stakes would go. Pull them out a bit and you have a tent that is tight as a drum. Stakes will be a thing of the past on gravel bars. We get our bags at Campmor. You can put mesh bag in the search bar on their website. They come in about four different sizes. Very tough bags. Below is a link.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___48222




    We also take a MSR Parawing. It is great when it is raining. We set the chairs up inside and have a stiff warm beverage. Large tent with lots of room. Serves as a great cook tent too. Great product that is very simple to put up. Below is a link.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___27411




    If you like good food, you will enjoy fresh biscuits and cornbread with some meals. We take GSI ten inch aluminum dutch oven. Only 3.8 lbs and works great. Below is a link.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___40710





    Peace of mind is an ACR Terrafix locator beacon.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___70112





    Camp coffee. Great french press made of stainless steel. Works great. Just add Peet's Major Dickason's Blend. Order it online at Peet's website and specify press pot grind when finalizing the order.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___21046

    http://www.peets.com/shop/coffee_det...d=118&cid=1005




    MSR Windpro stove. Great for the high winds. Simple to use and simmers well if you are actually cooking anything on it. Boils water fast for everything else. Just mail fuel cannisters up to the bush pilot ahead of time. Can't fly commercial with them. I also use MSR Miniworks water filter. Rock solid design and field servicable if needed. The service kit is about $20 but includes every spare part you could need. After 3 float trips, I have not had any malfunctions. Great design.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___87841





    I like thermarest tough nails sleeping pads but won't pay $150 for them. Something to consider if taking sleeping pads is if they fail and can't be repaired, you have no insulation beneath you. If out in cold weather, consider taking a closed cell foam mat to go beneath the self inflating pad. If the self inflating fails, you still have a R factor of 2.2 with the closed cell alone. If the self inflating does not fail, you will sleep warmer of course with this under the self inflating. Also makes a camp seat in a pinch.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___47727




    If you are concerned about night time visitors...

    http://www.udap.com/bearshock.htm



    Best fire starter I have ever used is Wet Fire.

    http://www.basegear.com/wetfiretinder.html
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Food ideas for float trip...

    For breakfast, we like bagels with the precooked bacon packs. The Boars Head comes in two seperate pouches which is convenient. Oscar Meyer comes in one bigger pack. We like block cheese and Harvest Food eggs (see their website for all kinds of great products). I use their powdered oil/shortening in my dutch oven. Works just like regular oil but without the weight/mess. We also take hot oatmeal and recently discovered Richmoor cold cereal. Just add water type. It comes in granola with strawberries and granola with raspberries. Both are delicious. I am 6' 6" and weigh 300 lbs. So I will buy 4 packs of the cereal and vacuum seal. 2.5 for me and 1.5 for my wife. If you eat a 2,000 calorie a day diet normally, perhaps one pack would be enough for breakfast. They taste great. I buy mine from www.wildernessdining.com This site sells lots of other great food items. Check out their website for all kinds of food related items. Great selection of hard to find items. I get the peanut butter and jelly individual packs there too. Great for putting on flour tortilla wraps or bagels for snacks/lunches. Very convenient. Comes with strawberry or grape jelly. These are larger packs and have plenty to make a sandwich or bagel. They also sell cheese in packs like this. That with some pilot bread would make a great snack/lunch.

    For lunch we take Mountain House Pro Paks. Vacuum sealed and slightly smaller portions than the regular Mtn House meals, they pack small and light yet are plenty for lunch. They come in about 10 different types. Spaghetti, Chili Mac, and Lasagna are my favorites. Go to the Mountain House website and order there. I just placed a big order myself for an upcoming NW Alaska float in Sept. They ship fast. One nice thing about having these meals for lunch everyday is that it makes things simple. No meal planning. Save that for the dinners. Keep it simple. Just boil some water riverside and have lunch. This route also saves weight compared to many other food ideas.

    For dinner, we go through more trouble. For the purpose of good morale perhaps. We take Darn Good (brand) dried chilli bags and make Jiffy cornbread in the dutch oven. We also make grayling gumbo. We take Zatarains Gumbo (dry mix) and slivers of about 2 lbs of grayling. Cook slow while the Bisquick garlic biscuits cook in the aluminum GSI 10" dutch oven. It only weighs 4 lbs and can be found on the wilderness dining website above. Also at Campmor.com. We cook fish for about 3/7 meals too. Usually dolly vardon (arctic char). We get Idaho instant potatoes (garlic is our favorite). We will make garlic bisuits in the dutch oven to go with. We also make mac and cheese to go with fish. Simple things like that. Some of the easy to make Suddenly Salad brands are nice too. They have a ranch and italian cold pasta salad. Great sides for a fish meal. We have also packed the 10" pita pizza deals. Take the pizza sauce in the bags and some block cheese to grate. Two person may be enough. And of course the pepperoni. In a pinch, we will just have one of the extra Mtn House Pro Paks. Maybe too tired to cook or got into camp late. Bad weather and such. I always carry 2-3 extra Mtn House Pro Paks. One tip, tape a disposable plastic spoon to the lasagna packs. The cheese in them is nearly impossible to get off your standard Lexan spoon. We burn the disposable spoon with the bag the meal was in. Dishes done.

    Save the clean lexan spoon for stirring the 100 proof peppermint schnapps into the hot chocolate. Also, Captain Morgans rum and hot apple cider is a good camp fire drink. For other times of the day, we take Crystal Light sticks and perhaps one gatorade packet per person/per day.

    For deserts, we take the Backpackers Pantry (brand) cheese cake and cream pie (same things). I love lemon, but chocolate mouse, strawberry, banana, and dark chocolate are great. Just add and stir some cold water into the bag, then sprinkle the graham cracker crumbs on top (included in the pack) and then let it sit and think for about 10 minutes. This desert must be tried. Amazing stuff.

    For snacks, the normal fare. Dried fruit and beef jerky vacuum seals to very small packs. Leave out the mango and apricots as it makes everything sticky. We love Cliff bars as they can get squished and are not effected by heat. Comes in about 20 flavors. And of course some home made gorp with the larger size M&M's.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Dollies...

    I am sure you already know, but thought I would mention that there is supposed to be some good dolly fishing on that river. Unless I am terribly mistaken, people float that river just for the dollies. Either way, I would take a fly rod. If you are planning on fishing for dollies while there, shoot me a pm.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Lightbulb Dan you are the Man!

    You are the most detailed orientated guy I have ever met! Very Cool and this is the list all of us should keep in out hunting file! Very well done Dan!

    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Rentals
    Your best bet in rafts, canoes and camp rentals
    Kotzebue, Alaska
    www.northwestalaska.com

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Dan- I don't eat that good when I car camp...LOL.. I'm a minimalist when I go on a trip. It's the only time I diet.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Thanks...

    Thanks Walt.

    Also, thanks for the good insights you gave me on the Kug. You should have forgotten by now, but my wife and I went on the Kug in 2006. We appreciate the help you gave and we had a great trip. Thanks man!
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Ivishak fishing...

    I just looked in a few of my fishing books and it is the Ivishak I was thinking about that has such good dolly fishing. Grayling too after reading over the books. I don't know if you are planning on fishing, but if you are, shoot me a pm. I will share some info with you. I fly fish, but my wife spin fishes. So either way, I can fill your ears full.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default The Book

    I have to agree with Phil that the lists in Mike's book are a great starting point. I also just got one of the knifes that you mentioned. I'm hopping to try it out for the fist time this fall.

  12. #12
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default Havalon Knife

    I don't usually mention gear by name but the guides on my Auodad hunt last Feb. in New Mexico used the Havalon knives for gutting, skinning, & caping. For caping they used the fixed blade knife with #70 blades.

    As anyone who has ever caped an animal knows, sharpness is important to a good caping job. It's just really convenient to be able to put in a new blade when one gets dull. Also, the #70 blades are thick enough to pry with. At 25 cents per blade, the convenience outweighs any cost.

  13. #13

    Default

    I sent you a pm.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    555

    Default

    Thanks for all the info guys. This isn't my first remote hunt but is my first float hunt and I am taking my 8 year old on his first outing with me so I'd like to be prepared.

    Thanks again
    Sa

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 375ultramag View Post
    Thanks for all the info guys. This isn't my first remote hunt but is my first float hunt and I am taking my 8 year old on his first outing with me so I'd like to be prepared.

    Thanks again
    Sa
    i know you know this man - but please double and triple-check that your son's PFD makes it into your gear! as someone who fell into the kenai or russian river (can't remember which one) from the bank when i was about 6, i can testify that paying attention to fish or game can sometimes keep kids from paying attention to the water.

    have a great time with your boy.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    555

    Default

    Yes on the PFD.

    We float the Willow all the time. He isn't allowed near the water with no PFD and to be honest I am at the point I always wear mine now. Too many quick accidents that could be avoided with a PFD.

    There is so many out there now days it isn't hard to find a comfortable one.

    Too many people die each year enjoying the outdoors because they either didn't look cool or they thought they were uncomfortable.

    A good PFD is now the same price as a tank of gas. Whoopee and it last longer.

  17. #17

    Default questions for dan, or anyone else who knows

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    I float NW Alaska rivers in the Fall and have found that rock bags work much better than stakes. Just fill the bags with rocks, which are everywhere in NW and I presume where you are going. Then one simple over hand knot to attach the bag cinch cord to the tent corners where the stakes would go. Pull them out a bit and you have a tent that is tight as a drum. Stakes will be a thing of the past on gravel bars. We get our bags at Campmor. You can put mesh bag in the search bar on their website. They come in about four different sizes. Very tough bags. Below is a link.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___48222




    We also take a MSR Parawing. It is great when it is raining. We set the chairs up inside and have a stiff warm beverage. Large tent with lots of room. Serves as a great cook tent too. Great product that is very simple to put up. Below is a link.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___27411
    I had a couple quests for dan:

    a) What size meshbags worked best,

    b)have you tried/rejected other similar, less expensive, "wing" setups (kelty, simple tarp setups).

    c) OK - with the caveat that there are no dumb questions - in what container do you transport stuff up there (i.e., on commercial aircraft)? I have good drybags, but some of the hard items might cause abrasion to the drybags during baggage handling (like a bow saw, or a square food case). I've even put the stuff inside of heavywt duffles and they get beat to smithereens by baggage handlers, sometimes, so I'm considering some other kind of hard luggage, and repacking in drybags when I get up there.

    I have some ideas, but wanted to know what you use?
    Last edited by stevesch; 07-22-2008 at 18:04. Reason: spelling, clarity

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 375ultramag View Post
    Yes on the PFD.

    We float the Willow all the time. He isn't allowed near the water with no PFD and to be honest I am at the point I always wear mine now. Too many quick accidents that could be avoided with a PFD.

    There is so many out there now days it isn't hard to find a comfortable one.

    Too many people die each year enjoying the outdoors because they either didn't look cool or they thought they were uncomfortable.

    A good PFD is now the same price as a tank of gas. Whoopee and it last longer.
    dude, you're SO right about the PFD issue. here in maryland, on relatively tame waters, we've had FOUR drownings in the past 7 days. the common denominator: no one wearing a PFD.

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Thoughts...

    Steve,

    We used the 15" X 22" bags for the tent. We took 6 for it. I also use 2 of the bags for extra support holding the ropes/stakes of the Parawing out. The stakes alone are hard to keep in place in the gravel. This is great when the wind picks up. My tent, Black Diamond Guiding Light, has places on all corners and the long sides for stakes to go. On average days, we used four, one on each corner. On windy/stormy days, we used six to hold the tent drum tight. If camping on gravel river bars, you will love this set up. Much better than trying to use stakes. And the bags are cheap and weigh next to nothing. Just cram them in the bag with the tent. Be sure to use a ground cloth if camping on gravel river bars. Bad on the tent floors. As for the mesh bags on Campmor, I also bought the duffle bag style one that is made the same as the link in the previous post I made. I will put a link below. It is perfect for holding fly rod tubes, fishing gear, stove, food for lunch, water filter and other crap you don't want to have to dig through all your gear bags to get at while you are floating. It sure makes lunch easier. I used to dig through everything trying to find lunch, water filter, stove,etc... What a pain. The duffle bag works great. The regular bags in the link below the duffle bag link below come in about 5 sizes.

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___70091

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___48222


    I have not used the other tarps, but I am sure some are very good. I love the MSR Parawing and it has earned a spot on all future trips. Nothing sucks worse than sitting in the tent when its blowing rain. This tarp allows you to hand outdoors. After all, that is why you are there in the first place. I only go to my tent to sleep. Below is a link to a newer, yet smaller MSR tarp. It is cheaper than the Parawing. I just saw it on Ebay while looking for the Parawing. Hoping I could send you a link to where I bought mine from. But check other places online for the below tarp. This is just the first place I saw it. It may be cheaper elsewhere. Looks nice for two people. But it will have less headroom and such.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/2008-MSR-Vista-W...3286.m20.l1116



    For getting your gear to Alaska, the Cabelas Rip Cord duffle bags are hard to beat. Good price on them too and very durable. I don't take many "hard" things. Just the gun case and I bought a Cabelas duffle with built in storage for the 18" X 38" (or so) Cabelas gun case. On my trips I am taking my S&W model 500 and a Marline Guide Gun (broke down). I keep everything in Outdoor Research dry bags. I got them at Campmor website. I get them in all different sizes. Everything in dry bags. Then all the assorted sized dry bags go in the large duffle bags to get them to Alaska. Once at the hangar, the dry bags come out and I carry the guns/fly rods tubes. The duffles and gun case stay in the hangar and the dry bags go on the bush plane. I have tried carrying larger waterproof backpacks and such to hold all the smaller dry bags, but find it easier to have more numerous smaller dry bags, than 3-4 big bags. Easier to get to things and much easier to pack in the Ally pack canoes. I will put a link to the dry bags below. Used the same ones for three float trips. Using them on the next one in Sept as well. Great dry bags. Buy different sizes. One for clothes, one for food, one for diddy bag/personal items/flashlight/etc.. one for the sleeping bag for darn sure, etc...

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___81486

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...l&N=4887&Nty=1


    Shoot me a pm if you want any other info. Happy to help if I can.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  20. #20

    Default thx

    well - that campmor website is playing games with the security system on my computer, so I guess I'll go out to REI tonite and see what they have; otherwise - I'll figure out how to some of those mesh bags, which are bigger and probably heavier than the stuff I have.

    My tent footprint is simple sheet plastic. May put tarp under that for extra protection.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •