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Thread: Some More Wildflowers

  1. #1
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Default Some More Wildflowers

    Would anyone happen to know the names of these flowers? Or better yet, recommend a good book with colored illustrations on Alaskan tundra flowers/plants.











  2. #2
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Default A couple more




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    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkSKeyMoe View Post
    I really like your sense of composition! You do a wonderful job of isolating the subject of interest!

    Do you shoot RAW, or JPEG? Do you do any serious post processing, or just a minimum?

    The reason I ask, is that I'm about to stick my foot in it... and suggest something that might make the images even better. It looks to me as if you are shooting JPEG and not adjusting for exposure variations. The image above appears to be typical, and lacks any really white highlights. In GIMP (an 8-bit depth editor), the highlights hit only as high as 222 (where 255 is maximum).

    To adjust the contrast to get highlights up close to 255, using GIMP I set the marker on the histogram at 250 (where it initially said that 100% of the values were lower than that) and adjusted contrast until some values were that high (it changed to saying that 99.9% of the image was lower than than). There are other ways to make that kind of adjustment, but with a flower the highlights are so delicate I wanted to do it in a way that would not block on any part of the image and that particular method allows very precise adjustment.

    Technically though, the best place to make adjustments to levels like that is with the RAW-to-JPEG converter rather than to an already converted image.

    It's also interesting to play with brightness and contrast both, as it provides a very different framing for the flower. That's totally a matter of taste though, and you might like one background while 5 other folks will like it 5 other ways.

    Of course the contrast change also depends on how the monitor it is viewed with is adjusted. Most laptop LCD displays, for example, are over contrasty and make that flower look the way I want it to without adjustment!

    Hmmm... let me link in a chart that I have on my web site to help determine if a monitor is something close to correct.



    The greyscale can be used to adjust monitor brightness and contrast. At worst only the darkest 3 or 4 squares should be all black, and the brightness control should adjust that. Only the lightest 3 or 4 squares should all be white, and the contrast control should adjust that. Ideally each patch should be distinguishable from the one next to it.

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    Member tull777's Avatar
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    Oh man, thanks for the chart Floyd! I new my monitor was toooo dark and unfortunately it has no adjustment for brightness control.

    And great shots AkSKeyMoe! Looks like you had some sun light for those shots. The one thing I have been missing for the last few weeks now.

    Thanks for sharing.
    http://www.pbase.com/tull777

    http://www.eddiefisherphoto.com/


    "If you're too open-minded, your brains will fall out. ....."Tight Lines & Best Fishes"

  5. #5
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd_Davidson View Post
    I really like your sense of composition! You do a wonderful job of isolating the subject of interest!

    Do you shoot RAW, or JPEG? Do you do any serious post processing, or just a minimum?
    I usually shoot in RAW, and for that particular image it was shot in RAW. When I was running out of memory space I switched over to JPEG for the rest of the day, but when I got home I found out that my camera was set to JPEG low rez.

    I usually just adjust the exposure, WB (when needed), contrast and apply some sharpening to the images. I also use a camera calibration preset that I found for a Pentax K100D on most of the images.

    This is done all with Lightroom 1.4.1 which I am still learning to use.

    The reason I ask, is that I'm about to stick my foot in it... and suggest something that might make the images even better. It looks to me as if you are shooting JPEG and not adjusting for exposure variations. The image above appears to be typical, and lacks any really white highlights. In GIMP (an 8-bit depth editor), the highlights hit only as high as 222 (where 255 is maximum).

    To adjust the contrast to get highlights up close to 255, using GIMP I set the marker on the histogram at 250 (where it initially said that 100% of the values were lower than that) and adjusted contrast until some values were that high (it changed to saying that 99.9% of the image was lower than than). There are other ways to make that kind of adjustment, but with a flower the highlights are so delicate I wanted to do it in a way that would not block on any part of the image and that particular method allows very precise adjustment.

    Technically though, the best place to make adjustments to levels like that is with the RAW-to-JPEG converter rather than to an already converted image.

    It's also interesting to play with brightness and contrast both, as it provides a very different framing for the flower. That's totally a matter of taste though, and you might like one background while 5 other folks will like it 5 other ways.
    I did bump up the exposure .75 and I thought it looked good on my monitor. Thanks for the suggestions, I'll play around with the image later on using them.

    Of course the contrast change also depends on how the monitor it is viewed with is adjusted. Most laptop LCD displays, for example, are over contrasty and make that flower look the way I want it to without adjustment!


    Hmmm... let me link in a chart that I have on my web site to help determine if a monitor is something close to correct.



    The greyscale can be used to adjust monitor brightness and contrast. At worst only the darkest 3 or 4 squares should be all black, and the brightness control should adjust that. Only the lightest 3 or 4 squares should all be white, and the contrast control should adjust that. Ideally each patch should be distinguishable from the one next to it.
    It looks good on my calibrated laptop monitor.

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by tull777 View Post
    Oh man, thanks for the chart Floyd! I new my monitor was toooo dark and unfortunately it has no adjustment for brightness control.

    And great shots AkSKeyMoe! Looks like you had some sun light for those shots. The one thing I have been missing for the last few weeks now.

    Thanks for sharing.
    Thanks tull777

    Yes blue skies finally after a few weeks of rain and fog! It lasted long enough to go out and enjoy the day but the fog rolled in again during the evening.

  6. #6
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Default

    How does this one look, any better?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkSKeyMoe View Post
    How does this one look, any better?
    That is just a little too far. Some of the pedals have lost surface
    detail.

  8. #8
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    The subject matter is pleasing indeed, but the lack of depth of field is what throws the subject out of focus. You want more then just a couple of petals and the other matter in focus for a truely wonderful photograph that can be sold to countless agencies !!

    Leasing your photographs to companies is a great way to make good money from home. But now your up against very pickey editors, that want / need perfection !!

    Keep up the good work !

  9. #9
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Majik Imaje View Post
    The subject matter is pleasing indeed, but the lack of depth of field is what throws the subject out of focus. You want more then just a couple of petals and the other matter in focus for a truely wonderful photograph
    The subject of course is not out of focus. It is framed though, and in a very pleasant to look at way that adds what makes that image stand out from others.

    More depth of field in that particular instance would rob it of the artistic character that makes it something other than just a run of the mill flower picture like 40 million others available on the web.

    Certainly it may have been by accident, though it might have been planned too. But the depth of field is centered right in the middle of that flower, and there is a ring of "out of focus" that frames the center of the flower and draws one's eyes to those pedals in the middle. (Which is why the exposure needs to be dead on correct, not a little to dark or even a little overexposed.)

  10. #10
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    I am not interested in your 'opinion'.

    I have expressed what 30 years of leasing photographs has taught me.

    I know only too well from experience, what you will stoop to, to descredit anything I type.

  11. #11
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floyd_Davidson View Post
    That is just a little too far. Some of the pedals have lost surface
    detail.
    OK. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Majik Imaje View Post
    The subject matter is pleasing indeed, but the lack of depth of field is what throws the subject out of focus. You want more then just a couple of petals and the other matter in focus for a truely wonderful photograph that can be sold to countless agencies !!

    Leasing your photographs to companies is a great way to make good money from home. But now your up against very pickey editors, that want / need perfection !!

    Keep up the good work !
    I have a lot to learn before I can start to think about making any $$ off my images.

    Thanks

  12. #12
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Yes you have a lot to learn.. and you can begin to learn more by purchasing "Photographers Market Book", sold in any good bookstore. This book is printed and updated each and every year.

    You will be very surprised when you begin to read and learn from this book, I purchased my very first copy in 1973.

    Making money from home is very easy to accomplish, this book gives you all the secrets and 'tips' as to what editors want & need .

    Good luck and post more images !!
    Also, don't be afraid to look and study images in books published about 'flowers' here is where you will learn the secret(s) of the Art of Photography !!

    Nice subject matter ( your image) Good luck in your quest !

  13. #13
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip Majik. I'll put the book on the list of our needs/wants for our trip to Anchorage next month.

  14. #14
    Member Majik Imaje's Avatar
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    Default Believe it or NOT !!!

    Well for one, you have the names of all companies & media that want to purchase or lease photographs, Every magazine that is published is listed, with important contact information, phone number, editors names etc.

    Big name companies such as Adobe, Corel, Hallmark & thousands more spend a lot of money each year on photographs from peoplel just like you!

    Learn how to type up delivery memo's, Study and learn how to 'submit' via delivery memo's. Companies respect professionalism when the 'rules' are followed on how to submit properly to agencies & editors.

    Creating a photograph is just one small step in learning how to make $$ and it is a lot easier than you think !! But this is Step #1 in how to learn how to market your images !!

    Good Luck, !! Create more images, study & learn !!

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