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Thread: Super Glue

  1. #1
    Member EricL's Avatar
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    Default Super Glue

    I've been toying around with the idea of putting a little tube of Super Glue in my first aid kit. I have heard they use something like this in emergency rooms but was wondering if anyone does this. I don't think I could stitch myself up and the task of rubbing some glue over a cut would be alot easier till you can get out of the field. Are there any Doctors out there that can offer their opinion? EricL

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs up excellent idea Eric...

    I posted on the product "Nexcare" recently. Its essentially a super glue for skin splits, blisters, etc.

    I used the product in the mountains this year on a tender, blister-ready spot and it worked great.

    The bottle is very small and would be unobtrusive in any pack, and a little goes a long ways.


    fk

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    Default double check this... but

    Check around but I considered the same thing and was told by both physicians and battle field vets that leaving the wound open but compressed with a clean sterile bandage is always better.

    I guess if you could close a spurting arterial bleed with it you might have something but otherwise the risk of infection is too great.

    If you know better, educate me...

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm pretty sure that cyanoacrylics (super glue) was actually invented for use in surgery. I have had it used when I had gum surgery, and I have used it to patch myself on occasions. Also my son got a gash on his head a few years back, and they glued him up at Providence.

    I would definately heed what others have said about not wanting to seal up a wound that isn't thoroughly sterilized.

    I carry a small tube in my first aid kit but have yet to use it in the field. I see it as more a last resort special use item. Also be careful how you pack it, as if it leaks it'll make a mess of stuff, and you want an unopened tube as they will go off over time once opened.

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default liquid bandage

    I haven't used super glue (other than accidentally gluing my fingers together!), but that liquid bandage stuff hurts like a SOB! I used some this summer on a small laceration and it must be laced with alcohol or something! It about put me through the roof. It didn't hold well and basically acted like a false scab which ended up getting pulled off or wore off fairly quickly. It wasn't worth the effort IMO.
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    Default super glue vs liquid bandage

    The super glue does not sting when you use it, I use it daily on my fingers in the summer. All the fishing I do my fingers split wide open. I use it twice a day come duck hunting season .

    I have never used the liquid bandage before but i have heard it does have some alcholal in it to help steralize the wound. I do not know if it is true or not though. I usually just use a baby wipe, let dry, then superglue the crack or cut shut.

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    Default Pitch...

    Pine Pitch was used and still is these days in remote areas where it's available. I heard once that it was warmed to a pasty goo and applied to the wound. It kept the dirt out, was tough enough to allow one to continue to work within reason and left no scar on the wound when the healing process was over. Just a thought!

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    Default

    Super glue is good to go. Between my wife always using it (taxidermist) and my buddy (musher) using it on his dogs, I wouldnt hesitate. After a bit of time it slowly dissapates (is that the right word?) and by that time the wound has healed. Its been used for many years and still works.

  10. #10
    Member Adventure's Avatar
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    Default

    I've used super glue on myself and others, but mostly for splits and cracks from dry weather. I tried it on a wound but it wouldn't stick due to moisture so I ended up doing 6 stitches on myself. This was no fun at all so now I carry butterfly closures. I haven't needed them yet but I tried some on wet skin to see if they'd stick on a real bleeding wound and I don't know how but they stuck good. They come in different sizes too.

    Personally if I'm a week or so from comeing out of the woods I don't want any open wounds. I understand the infection risk but any good first aid kit should be equipped with cleaning and disinfecting stuff. I have Bedadine soap, alcahol and steril gauze pads. This will sting bad too but the other option is to leave the germs in there.

    Medical issues aside, for how much room it takes up a fresh tube of super glue is so handy to have.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Paul is correct, superglue was originally developed as a surgical adhesive.

    I have personally glued finger cuts with it, mostly to satisfy my curiosity. It works. Pinch the wound closed before applying.

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    Default

    Its funny that this topic came up. one of my night mechanics had to go into the hospital cuz he tried to catch a 10lb prybear with his head. Prybar won but the folks at providence superglued his laceration back together. So yes, the hospitals still use superglue. It will probably be the most expensive tube of superglue but oh well.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Read this

    I am an registered nurse and have almost 1 year E R experience. I have never seen super glue anywhere in any hospital. We do have a product called Durabond. It is purple and very pliable when dry. Only downfall, when it gets below freezing, it is ruined. It is in a glass ampule with cotton plug. You break it and apply it. Worthless in cold temps though. There is a product that we use (just recently on gun shot) and I bought some for my back country trips. It is called quik clot. www.quikclot.com It is made in the netherlands and was designed to stop the #1 cause of death on the battlefield... bloodloss. It was designed for the military and has branched off to emergency rooms and probably ambulances all over the country. It stops moderate to severe blood loss by promoting rapid anti-coagulation. It will stop an artery bleeding. I know this much. I bought mine while down in Anchorage at a safety/survival store. Cant remember the name but it had the name safety or survival in it and sold all kinds of ems/firefighter type stuff. It is about $20 per pack. It is in an OD green vacuum sealed pack about 4 " x 5" x 1/2". It should be in every pack. I also carry a suture kit. But as earlier mentioned. That would be tough/impossible to do on yourself. This stuff is simply poured on the wound and pressure is applied and bam! Bleeding stops. That is all there is to it. It burns like hell when applied. But that is the least of your worries if you are bleeding out. It works. Plain and simple. I suggest you check it out.

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    Default Quikclot too

    I keep a tube of super glue in my first aid kit and I have added a package of Quikclot. The Quikclot is a type of gauze that has a substance in it to cause clotting. It has been used by our military for several years and has saved a lot of lives of wounded soldiers and Marines. A friend told me about it and I ordered it at Quikclot.com. I recently had occasion to use it when a buddy fell on a hike and badly gashed his leg. We tried to stop the bleeding with regular gauze but it would not stop. I opened a pack of the Quikclot and put it directly on the wound and pressed on it for a couple of minutes. It totally stopped the bleeding. We used super glue to close it up and then got him back to the trailhead. If you are often in places where help is difficult to get, Quikclot should be added to your kit.

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    Default

    The quick clot pads are an item we added to our 1st aid kits for wilderness canoe trips with our church youth group last year & I got one for my hunting pack at the same time. Thankfully no field testing yet.
    As for the superglue, I don't want to get into details about my stupidity 2 Christmases ago but let's say I was using a large folding knife for the wrong tool & violating all the ruleswith it & drove it into the meaty part of the palm of my hand below the thumb. The wound was deep & nesrly an inch long. I got the bleeding stopped with cold water & superglued it (to my wife's protests that I needed stiches). I added to the superglue along the edges after the initial batch dried.
    Healed great with almost no scar. It's in my field kit now.
    Vance in AK.

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    Excellent information, especially regarding the QuikClot. Thanks to all.

    I love your signature line, Vince.

  17. #17
    Member Ryan B's Avatar
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    Default

    I have used super glue on several cuts on my head and limbs. The main thing to remember after cleaning and sterilizing the wound is leaving the low part of the cut open so the wound can still drain if need be.

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    Default

    Its a well founded "get 'er shut NOW!!!!" for cuts around here, especcially among outdoors typs a looooooooooooooooooooooong way from the "Big Clinic", as villagers say, in Kotzebue, who will fix you up enough to get you to Anch, where they fix bones, deep cuts and surgery.

    A friend out caribou hunting one fall 15 or so years ago, became the camp cook after cutting while gutting and he had used superglue and stayed in camp. Guess that stuck in my head! Its good stuff..... he sure loved telling his wife how good she looked elbow deep in Caribou !!! ~~LOL!!~~
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    Be really careful with QuickClot. It is for last resort when bandages aren't working (actually I think you can use it before a tourniquet is applied. A tourniquet is the last resort to save life.) Also if you have to apply QuickClot get medical attention as soon as possible. Don't forget to tell the hospital that you used QuickClot.

    I don't think it is supposed to be used on chest or abdominal wounds either. I could be wrong, I don't have my field manual with me.

  20. #20
    Member northriver21's Avatar
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    One year my youngest son tripped and fell against an airplane float cutting him on the forehead. It was a pretty deep wound, so I took him to the clinic to stitch it up. The doc told me that stitches would be more traumatic for the little guy than the injury, so they decided to use the liquid bandage.

    It worked well and he only has a small scar left. After receiving the bill from the clinic I was outraged.. They charged me 3 or 4 hundred bucks for "surgery" I called them to complain that they had smeared some glue on my kids head and want that kind of money in return. As it turns out it was a billing mistake because were originally there for stitches, so thatís what they billed for.

    Well a few days after this my oldest son smacked into the corner of an open car door. It needed stitches and his mother was in a panic to take him to the clinic.

    After watching the doc on the last one I convinced my wife to let me handle it. We cleaned the wound and she held him down while I put super glue on to seal it up. It worked like a charm and was almost free. I had to pick old chunks of glue out of the little guys hair for weeks after the wound had healed, good times.

    Now, for the quick- clot. Last fall, while at moose camp, I was splitting wood. A piece of metal about the size of my thumbnail chipped of the splitting maul when it struck. The shrapnel sliced through 3 of my fingers like a bullet. The wounds would not stop bleeding and I was losing a fair amount of blood so we used the quick clot. It took about 3 applications to stop the bleeding, but it did stop it. It took me 9 hours by buggy, plane and car to get to the ER. When I got there they gave me the honor of cleaning that stuff out. It hurt and that stuff sure does stick, but it did what it was intended to do.


    I will always carry super glue and quick clot in my first aid kit.

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