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Thread: Mountain Goat gun - question

  1. #1

    Default Mountain Goat gun - question

    Had planned to take my 338 Win Mag on my fall Mtn Goat/Black Bear Hunt. Found out this morning that the scope has scratches and other issues on the internal lenses. I need to send it back for warranty work, which will take up to a month.

    I have a 270 Winchester with a great Leupold scope. It is a tack driver. My issue is, "should I find a good 140 to 150 grain premium bullet for my 270 and take it on the hunt or should I take the scope off the 270 and put it on the 338"?? Right now I'm leaning towards putting the scope on the 338 and taking it. I just hate separating a good shooting gun/scope combo. Is the 270 with premium bullets a match for a mtn goat or should I get over it and put the better scope on my 338 (not many brown bears in this area). As you can tell I don't want to buy another scope until I hear back from the warranty guys.
    Thanks

  2. #2

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    Is the one that is messed up a Leupold?

  3. #3

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    Nah, the Burris is messed up.

  4. #4

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    I killed my Idaho goat with a .270. There isn't a goat that walks that won't succomb to the old winchester. I prefer speed and go for 130 partitions, however any premium bullet will work perfect.

  5. #5

    Default .270 Goat rifle....

    I have only harvested one goat and I shot mine w/ a 7 mm mag. Believe it or not, but I get the best groupings from cheap ol' 175 gr Core-Lokts. I shot mine at about 175 yds. Went right down. I have however shot many, many whitetails back home in Tennessee w/ a .270. I would definately use the .270.

  6. #6

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    270 should be fine for goat, a little light for bear. Here they say not to shoot an elk int the shoulder with a 270. Boiler room OK. So for a bear, pick your shot.

  7. #7

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    Not too worried about the bear. Should have plenty of opportunities for bear, but probably only one shot at the goat.

  8. #8

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    I shot a mtn goat with a 6.5X55, good shot, killed it dead. M38 Swede rifle, iron sights at about 125 yds.

    I used ot work for Joe Beatty, the cattle rancher, in Kodiak, he shot 12 brown bear with his 270 Rem 721 and ratty old weaver 4x

    I'd say stick with the 270 and both hit the range and dry fire as much as you can.

    Have a good hunt

  9. #9
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    First I would not break up a tuned rifle/scope combination. Second I think a 270 is a great goat caliber. Seems I hear about more one shot kills with something like a 270 as opposed to for instance a 338. Many times it seems that the larger/more powerful calibers will pass thru a goat with much less of a hydrostatic shock effect. Goats are tough and can take a lot of trauma and keep on truckin' it seems. Morphologically they are somewhat slab sided and it seems to me the more powerful rounds are already thru the goat before the have really started to open up much. Of course this depends on the angle of the shot. I have never read anything about this and this conclusion is mostly conjecture on my part. Whether I am right or full of hot air, the 270 have a long history of being very effective on billies. Of note, I shot my billie at maybe 70 yards with a 330 Dakota 210 gr Nos Part....tho he was dead and didn't know it after the first shot he kept going...yep, he got a second dose. Bottom line, take your 270, you do your part and you will have no regrets.

  10. #10
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    I am willing to bet a buck ($) that the 270 has killed more goats than the 338.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Western View Post
    Had planned to take my 338 Win Mag on my fall Mtn Goat/Black Bear Hunt. Found out this morning that the scope has scratches and other issues on the internal lenses. I need to send it back for warranty work, which will take up to a month.

    I have a 270 Winchester with a great Leupold scope. It is a tack driver. My issue is, "should I find a good 140 to 150 grain premium bullet for my 270 and take it on the hunt or should I take the scope off the 270 and put it on the 338"?? Right now I'm leaning towards putting the scope on the 338 and taking it. I just hate separating a good shooting gun/scope combo. Is the 270 with premium bullets a match for a mtn goat or should I get over it and put the better scope on my 338 (not many brown bears in this area). As you can tell I don't want to buy another scope until I hear back from the warranty guys.
    Thanks
    The 270 would no doubt make a great goat rifle but I can't help but wonder, why did you select the 338 inthe first place? And why not put the 270 scope on the 338 and go as planned? The scope remount would take about a half hour in the dark and a sight in would be a good time to practice and select correct loading. Just wondered about those things.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  12. #12

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    I've had the 338 for years and it has always been my go to gun. The 270 is newer and although it shoots a little straiter, I don't have the history with it like the 338. (With the 270 I have shot several antelope at 300+ yards and 2 deer inside of 150 yards. With the 338 I've shot quite a few elk, deer, and antelope.) Many of you will know what I'm talking about. With the 270 being so accurate I hate taking off the scope and compromising anything. I used to do a lot of varmint hunting and whenever something was set up right it rarely paid to swap scopes or try something different. On a different note the 270 is a little bit lighter. Maybe it is time for the 270 to get a few war wounds from the goat hills.

  13. #13
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    I scouted for my brother in law one yr. down by Seward and he used his Mk X .300 H&H with 180's and I carried the lowly .44 mag-lots of bear down low. Long story short, that billy with the 9 1/2" horny things took the shot like it was hit with something pretty hard, jumped up and went down some 2 or 300ft. Upon skinning the animal out and deboning, ain't much to a billy that I could see that a .270 cannot handle in my book. I liked the .270 and had 5 at one time but not a one this day-still nothing wrong with your .270. Use a good bullet, perhaps the Barnes, Trophy Bond, Swift etc.. just for good insurance, don't mess around with a bullet that could turn your arduous hunt into a bummer.

    regards,

    by the way they are a trophy to be proud of!

  14. #14
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    Hard to imagine a better goat/black bear rifle than a straight shooting 270. You should have no problems. Good luck.

  15. #15
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Western View Post
    ... Maybe it is time for the 270 to get a few war wounds from the goat hills.
    The goat cliffs sure can give a rifle some battle scars. Sounds like both of yours are for hunting more than display/collecting.

    I'd take the lighter rifle.

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